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Old 26th April 2012, 2:50 AM   #256
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Decided to continue machining on my handlebar clamps. These pivot off the frame and hold onto conventional 31.8mm mountain bike handlebars.

This is what they looked like when I worked on them last which was quite some time ago:



and after this night:





Apart from putting the two main holes in the second clamp I need to now drill, tap and recess for the two pairs of clamping bolts. After this the final shaping such as the radius cuts.
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Old 28th April 2012, 7:41 PM   #257
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Finished my handlebar clamps. I made the silly mistake of boring out the handlebar hole to 32mm instead of 31.8 (1-1/4) however when done it up it takes up the gap easily.

Pics:







and fitted:




Now I know these are quite bulky in their construction however I figure that they will be subject to reasonably strong loads.
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Old 29th April 2012, 12:11 AM   #258
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Thats not bulky at all. Sure theres a few sharp edges to clean up, but its a great effort.

As for the 32mm VS 1 1/4" bore size, you generally want it to be a touch over. So 0.1mm per side is actually a nice slide fit. You would not want to go any looser, but thats totally accecptable for steel / alloy pinch system.

You usually bet on 0.1mm diameter however.

Get some alfoil from the kitchen. Wrap one clean smooth layer around your handle bar, put a screw driver in your clamp to lightly open it a touch. Slide handle bar and everything in. Do it up tight. Use a knife to cut off the excess.

You wouldnt even know its there or see it, and it helps prevent scoring into your handle bars, and it provides a nice soft surface to clamp too.
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Old 29th April 2012, 12:30 AM   #259
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I mean bulky as in physically large. If you compare this to the clamp on a mountain bike headstem these two I made are huge, however they arn't too heavy and as I said above they could use the strength.

I will still take the edges off as you said and also I need to fit a bushing for these. The bushing will be out of Vesconite stock and fit into the 30mm hole to suit the 25mm shaft that I will have going through it.

You right about the fitment, you see in my previous job I had to make a clamp and I made the fitment a tiny bit loose, it was in steel and had crap all give so it caused a problem. That's why I was concerned at first, I was already thinking of putting strips of a coke can in there. However because of the good deflection this clamps fully and very well. It springs out when undone so it's self ejecting which will be very handy later when I have to trim it to size with multiple test fitments. There will be almost no torsional force on the bar and very little pushing force so I don't think the clamp would be stressed much even if I only had one of the two M6 bolts.

During this coming day I might have a go shaping and fitting the middle of the cross boom so I can get a crucifix shape like a trike frame is traditionally meant to have.
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Old 21st May 2012, 11:30 PM   #260
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Center section welded in and the first stage of the power shaft completed and in place:





Even though I machined a pocket for it the housing ended up being crooked. To fix this I ended up putting a slot in the frame just before the housing to bend and reweld it.

The middle shaft has two different threads on the left side- M20 x 1.5 R.H and a M22 x 1 Left hand. The empty space between the M22 thread and the bearing will be for a flat section where I can put a spanner on to take it apart. The adapter that uses this thread however will cover it when assembled.

The M22 thread will be for the drive of my electric assist and the M20 is to power the left side uni-joint. I could not have a shared thread because if they both where on a right hand thread then the torque from electric assist would try and unwind the uni-joint, or alteratively with a shared left hand side thread the uni-joint would undo by itself off the shaft. So to fit the adapter for the electric drive it's slid over the top of the smaller M20 thread and would in backwards on the shaft.

The right side and the inside of the shaft are not yet finished. This side will be machined to suit a common 1-3/8" bike thread. I am going to have a classic wind on 6-speed freewheel instead of the cassette type cluster due to a design/clearence issues. It means more weight but it's much easier to package, works with my electric assist better and is narrower. I made sure to buy one with ramps on the teeth for smooth changes, all 5 and most 6 speeds just had wind on cogs without profiled teeth.

The right side uni-joint will be powered by a drive-shaft that fits down the inside of this power shaft via an internal M20x1.5 thread. So all up this component will have two left and two right hand threads on this one part alone. You could say my thread cutting skills have improved.

I beleive that the way this is going to fit together will look interesting enough to warrant a video, this shaft is going to have all of the following: middle bearing support, sprocket cluster, adapter for e-assist sprocket, outer bearing support inc deraileur mount, cog for rear drive and two uni joints, one them likely using a seperate shaft for power. All of this will be self locking and will come apart easily for maintenance.
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Old 28th May 2012, 7:04 PM   #261
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Almost completely finished my center power transfer shaft, with it being such a complex part I am really glad I didn't make enough critical mistakes that I had to redo it. Here's how it looks now:



The flat sides in the middle suit a 22mm spanner to help with dissassembly. I still need to remove the small shoulder on the right middle, otherwise it's complete.





View from the end, I took this metal out to save weight as it wasn't needed.





Looking inside, there's a 25mm long straight section that's machined to be exactly 20mm before coming to a 20 x 1.5 L.H thread. The uni joint & outer bearing support shaft will locate on this section and transmit the torque using this internal thread.



The sprocket cluster wound on:





and in place on the frame:



Notice how the main spine and crank boom are misaligned, this is how it's meant to sit. I purposefully offset the crank shell 3mm off to one side, that added to the ftattened section and the different in pipe sizes adds to the illusion of being way out of alignment.
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Old 29th May 2012, 10:48 AM   #262
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How the frame is looking at the moment:

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Old 10th June 2012, 11:34 PM   #263
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I started and finished a small but important part today. Unfortunetly I had to do it twice as I wasn't far from finishing the first go when I realised I was cutting an internal right hand thread when I needed a left. After a bit of a mini tantrum, food and rest I went back to it and made the final one. Here it is below- a simple adapter:



Features an (M22 x 1) L.H internal thread and a (M30 x 1) right hand thread on the outside.





My drive-line parts that I have so far laid out. The next series of photos below show the order in which this is assembled.





Central shaft in place with the adapter wound into the freewheel.





Adapter wound on.





Sprocket adapter put on to the freewheel. I still need to make the coupling that clamps to the other side of the teeth.



How the frame looks now shown below, I slid on a prototype uni-joint for the visual. I think it's looking quite aggressive.






The next part I need to make to continue with this center drive is the shaft that fits through the middle of the gear cluster. However this is a bit of an issue for me as ideally I should be making it one piece with the uni-joint. However I am far from ready with my uni-joint design. I could make another thread in there which would get me going in rear wheel drive and let the uni-joint be independantly changed but I would be compromising the design. The main thing however would be that I could make the shaft and continue with the rest of the construction. It also has the advantage making it likely I am able to make this shaft without making ireversable mistake because it's only a basic design without the complex uni-joint machining involved, this alone movitates me to make them seperate.
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Old 11th June 2012, 11:28 AM   #264
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Wow, starting to look like something now. Im really liking it.

The rear red chain tensioner (?), whats that about ? Or is it just a guide roller for the chain to stop excessive chain slap ?
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Old 11th June 2012, 11:33 AM   #265
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Yes it's starting to be recognisable.

The two pulleys are for the return chain routing. The chain runs over the fork, around the top of the rear pulley, under the middle pulley and then past the inside of the tension pulley to the cog. This allows every part of the chain to be higher than the bottom side of the frame which will have a solid bash gaurd on it. If I get something usable in the end I am going to give it such a beating
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Old 17th June 2012, 9:18 PM   #266
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Machining took way too long today for something simple looking, but I guess that's how this hobby works. Rush a little bit and the part ends up in the bin. Time aside 38mm solid cro-mo isn't cheap either.

Here's what I did:





It's the part on the top right, it still needs the middle machined out and another fine + left hand thread cut on the inside to let the uni-joint wind in.





It fit's into my main shaft as so, this is just for the photo and without the other parts in place.




Assembled together with the cluster, 15T fixed cog and the thin-section bearing. This particular bearing is an odd size at 35-42-5 which most bearing places wouldn't even have a listing for in their books. However it's an ideal size for my application. The cog tightens against the fixed shoulder of the bearing until it's pushed against the shoulder.

I will have a bracket that comes off the main boom for the third bearing support, this will also be my deraileur mount. I also plan on putting some flats into the outer shoulder to help me take it apart for servicing. I want good access to every bearing or servicable part on this trike.

What's good about this driveline arangement is that I can run it in rear wheel drive independently. This is because the uni-joints don't need to be attached for the rear wheel to still get it's power. My initial design had the bearing support and rear cog on the outside of the uni-joint itself.
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Old 28th June 2012, 11:43 AM   #267
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A very notable update today. I have just finished a 40 hour training course with Solidworks CAD software. I have not had much time yet but here is one of the things I have have come up with so far- it's a high angle uni-joint:





I started off with a very basic design from which I optimised it to be able to tilt to a theoretical 50 degree angle before binding, followed by bringing the material closer to the pivots where possible to increase strength and reduce size and then finally started to sculpt bits out to reduce weight.


I also am able to do basic Von Mises Stress testing:



This is with the inside base as a fixed point and 1000Nm each into the two pivots pushing in opposite directions. It still came up with a 5 fold factor of safety with 4130 and the weight was 70 grams.

When I did do this work I do however only make changes that I would be able to do on my mill, I would of loved to of sculpted curved variable depth sections out but I am not going to pay someone to CNC machine this for me.

This still didn't have some of the exact dimensions and I needed a design for a 30mm shaft input unlike this 22mm input. That one while finished doesn't look quite as interesting but it is more accurate of what I would like to do. I will post a picture of that soon.


Here's something else I came up with, it's a mountain tamer alternative:




This update means that from here on things change significantly, I am likely going to digitize almost all of the parts before I make them and possibly do a model of the whole frame design. I was shown how to do moveable assemblies so I could add a theoretical motor to provide a turning force to the crank and show a video of everything being powered.

Previously I had given up trying to model a uni-joint, hence why I made a couple of prototypes. Even looking at those I struggled to visualise the changes that where necessary to make them be able to turn to a greater angle. Now with only a few hours of computer work I have a design that can tilt even beyond what I thought I could do with an offset pivot spider. The alternative would of been an obscene amount of trial and error uni's which realistically would of made me just compromise in the end and also resort to a high offset spider which would of caused much more drag.

So from now one there's going to be a big pile of CAD drawings on here, well on the bright side people will finally be able to see where I am heading.
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Old 28th June 2012, 5:24 PM   #268
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I think you should start building motorbikes
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Old 29th June 2012, 9:30 AM   #269
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Looking amazing!

I have just started learning to turn. I am impressed by your surface finish! Mine always looks like it is dragging but the guy teaching me says it is fine for that material on that lathe.

James
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Old 29th June 2012, 9:40 AM   #270
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anakist View Post
Looking amazing!

I have just started learning to turn. I am impressed by your surface finish! Mine always looks like it is dragging but the guy teaching me says it is fine for that material on that lathe.

James
James are you working with black (mild) steel? My parts above normally would have a shocking surface finish and I have some special tips that help but for anything that has a bearing go down it I do something very odd to get that finish. I use a parting blade as a sideways turning tool. I get it within 0.1mm then I run the parting tool down it. It's wrong in every way however I don't have anything that gives a nicer finish on cro-mo and the side load doesn't seem to bother it. Just don't try it ok!!

For the black metal a buddy of mine is getting outstanding results with Cermet tips and very high speeds.

Anyway my point of all this is to say that there seems to be an endless amount of tricks and tungsten tips available so don't concern yourself too much at this stage. Later you can try different tooling to have a nicer finish.




I was looking back at the start of this thread and I found it's amazing that in such a time ago I had little idea on how to do things. Sure I am still clueless most of the time but it's been one serious learning curve.
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