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Old 12th September 2017, 10:07 PM   #1
Riddick187 Thread Starter
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Default Having some troubles getting a sub to power up, suspect blown fuse or other..

I recently picked up a TS500 Tannoy Sub and now have troubles powering it up. Sub appears to be imported from the UK. Here's a link to its electrical requirements page in the manual: link

On the back of the sub it says it's designed to take in 230v-3A 50Hz and uses a T3.15AL 250v mains fuse.

I plugged in a regular mains cable from another sub I have and it did nothing. No pop etc.

There's also another mains cable for UK, with a built in fuse of 5A. I tried this one with an adapter and also didn't get any result.

I popped the fuse holding bracket from the mains supply inlet on the back of the sub and the T3.15AL 250v fuse was shattered. I pulled it out correctly and slowly, so I don't think I shattered it, though I can't rule this out completely.


I am not very schooled in electronics, but the only things that come to mind are:

- The 250v fuse blew/shattered if I first (can't recall which I tried first) connected and tried the power lead (no fuse on that one) from my other subwoofer. Since that sent 230v at 10 amps from the socket as opposed to the required 230v / 3 Amps. Edit: Having read up on this, it seems a voltage rated circuit will only pull as much current as it needs from the outlet, so the fuse blowing/breaking has nothing to do with me using a non fuse protected power lead.

- The fuse was already blown and I just need to replace it and hope it works.

- the fuse shattered when I was taking it out (it doesn't look burnt, just shattered), as I understand fuses don't typically shatter, they just burn out/coil snaps. This is the worst case scenario, since it's nothing to do with fuse, the problem is in the sub power supply.


What I think I need to do:


- Stick another 250v 3.15A fuse in there (Which of the ones Jaycar has should I pick ?). This one should be ok ?

- Source a mains lead with 3v fuse built in. Or maybe I can try the uk mains lead with an adapter again, since that has 5v fuse on it.

- Not try any non fuse (3v/5v) protected mains lead.


Any advice would be appreciated. Here hoping I just blew a fuse and it's not a faulty sub.

Last edited by Riddick187; 13th September 2017 at 12:35 AM.
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Old 12th September 2017, 10:46 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riddick187 View Post
- Stick another 250v 3.15A fuse in there (Which of the ones Jaycar has should I pick ?)
A time delayed aka slow blow fuse.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riddick187 View Post
- Source a mains lead with 3v fuse built in. Or maybe I can try the uk mains lead with an adapter again, since that has 5v fuse on it.
Use the mains lead from your old sub. The fused cable would mainly be safety for someone damaging the mains lead like dropping furniture on it or something stupid. The amp is already fused.

I noticed the manual mentions 120v as an input voltage as well. Nowadays most subs are auto-sensing for the input voltage for end user convenience, but just to make sure, is there a little 'slide' switch somewhere near to where the mains lead plugs in with 120/230 printed on it? Like the old atx computer power supplies have.



Anyway, get a replacement fuse of the correct rating and normal mains lead and give it a go.
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Old 12th September 2017, 10:56 PM   #3
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A voltage switch - if present - may also be a rotating type. Usually if it's a rotating type it will have four or five voltages to choose from.
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Old 12th September 2017, 10:58 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by /invariance\ View Post
A time delayed aka slow blow fuse.

Use the mains lead from your old sub. The fused cable would mainly be safety for someone damaging the mains lead like dropping furniture on it or something stupid. The amp is already fused.

I noticed the manual mentions 120v as an input voltage as well. Nowadays most subs are auto-sensing for the input voltage for end user convenience, but just to make sure, is there a little 'slide' switch somewhere near to where the mains lead plugs in with 120/230 printed on it? Like the old atx computer power supplies have.
image


Anyway, get a replacement fuse of the correct rating and normal mains lead and give it a go.
No such voltage switch, so I think it's auto sensing. This sub also has auto-standby/sleep, so it's not a very old sub design wise.

Why the slow blow one though ? Aren't the fast blow safer ? Not sure which I had before, but doesn't look like it had a ceramic wire.

Last edited by Riddick187; 12th September 2017 at 11:31 PM.
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Old 12th September 2017, 11:21 PM   #5
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The slow blow fuse is for when there is a high inrush current when the sub is turned on as the large power supply filter capacitors are charged up.
This inrush current only happens very briefly, but can be long enough for a normal fast blow fuse to fail.
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Old 13th September 2017, 12:15 PM   #6
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Hey, congratulations - this page is the fourth listed on a Google hit for "TS500 Tannoy Sub fuse type" hit...

Also seen input voltage settings doen by swapping the position on the actual mains input socket. Oddly enough only on UK equipment...

Anyway, seen a few glass fast blow fuses broken/shattered over the years so it's sorta not that uncommon, but only when when the internals have a catastrophic internal hardware failure. So on saying that do not put a larger value fuse (greater than that nominal 3 amp) in there, just in case that amp actually has a fault causing the fuse to pop.

If you're overly concerned with the glass breaking you can get ceramic cased fuses, but then they become a pain if/when they blow because you thence need a multimeter to verify if they're functional if the equipment doesn't then power up... fine for the Old Hands with the right gear handy handy, Trap For Young Players that don't.

Either way, if your new replacement fuse lets go then you'd have to assume there's there's a problem within the amp that needs appropriate doctoring.
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Old 13th September 2017, 6:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by /invariance\ View Post
The slow blow fuse is for when there is a high inrush current when the sub is turned on as the large power supply filter capacitors are charged up.
This inrush current only happens very briefly, but can be long enough for a normal fast blow fuse to fail.
Changed the fuse, it powered up like a charm. Bought two cheap fuses at jaycar, one fast blow and the other slow.

The fast blow one died 5 minutes into listening as I cranked the music up.

The slow blow fuse is going strong *fingers crossed*.

Sub has too much power it seems, it's making the gyprock in the room crap itself, creating trembling vibrations that don't sound too good, even when not cranked up high. The sound is pure from the sub itself though. Would never go for a 500W sub in the first place, but got it for next to free.

Last edited by Riddick187; 13th September 2017 at 6:40 PM.
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Old 13th September 2017, 6:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merlin13 View Post
Hey, congratulations - this page is the fourth listed on a Google hit for "TS500 Tannoy Sub fuse type" hit...

Also seen input voltage settings doen by swapping the position on the actual mains input socket. Oddly enough only on UK equipment...

Anyway, seen a few glass fast blow fuses broken/shattered over the years so it's sorta not that uncommon, but only when when the internals have a catastrophic internal hardware failure. So on saying that do not put a larger value fuse (greater than that nominal 3 amp) in there, just in case that amp actually has a fault causing the fuse to pop.

If you're overly concerned with the glass breaking you can get ceramic cased fuses, but then they become a pain if/when they blow because you thence need a multimeter to verify if they're functional if the equipment doesn't then power up... fine for the Old Hands with the right gear handy handy, Trap For Young Players that don't.

Either way, if your new replacement fuse lets go then you'd have to assume there's there's a problem within the amp that needs appropriate doctoring.
Fourth ? Looks to be the first and only. There are however some relevant hits for "TS500 arena fuse".

I changed the fuse and it's working fine now. Time will tell. Like you said, hopefully it's not some reoccurring theme where the subs internal power supply has spikes and draws too much, causing the fuse to blow.

It's definitely not too gentle on fuses, killing a fast blow within 5 minutes. The slow blow is holding up well it seems.
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Old 13th September 2017, 10:10 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riddick187 View Post
...it's making the gyprock in the room crap itself...
Don't run test tones through it then, you might have a sheet come down on you
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Old 16th September 2017, 4:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riddick187 View Post
Changed the fuse, it powered up like a charm. Bought two cheap fuses at jaycar, one fast blow and the other slow.

The fast blow one died 5 minutes into listening as I cranked the music up.

The slow blow fuse is going strong *fingers crossed*.
...Would never go for a 500W sub in the first place, but got it for next to free...
Blows a fast 5-amper at nominal 240v mains (ie 1200 watts), for only a 500 watt amp? Even at 500 watt RMS cranked right out that sounds a tad on the weird/suspect side there, unless it was a cheap/nasty fuse in the first place.

As already noted pops it on power-up I'd believe but... anyway, prob a good idea to have a spare slow-blow or two in house, juuuuust in case.
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Old 16th September 2017, 10:42 PM   #11
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Not overly surprising if the amp has a big trafo with relatively short conduction angle. Combine the glass fuse with a vibration environment and you've definitely put yourself together the conditions to get edgy fuse blowing.
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Old 20th September 2017, 1:48 PM   #12
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Blows a fast 5-amper at nominal 240v mains (ie 1200 watts), for only a 500 watt amp? Even at 500 watt RMS cranked right out that sounds a tad on the weird/suspect side there, unless it was a cheap/nasty fuse in the first place.

As already noted pops it on power-up I'd believe but... anyway, prob a good idea to have a spare slow-blow or two in house, juuuuust in case.

3.15A fuse actually. I am not sure how these things work, but it appeared to blow as I cranked the volume up, not at power on when capacitors charge up. Perhaps it has something to do with excessive vibrations and short conduction angle as another poster had stated above.

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Old Yesterday, 11:06 AM   #13
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Ack - sorry, 5 amp fuses on the brain atm. Got a few large bits of gear on the bench atm using 5 amp fuses that keep blowing...

Is that amp or yours rated as RMS or Peak?
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