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Old 15th April 2017, 10:33 AM   #286
Statitica
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Originally Posted by cdtoaster View Post
most importantly my wifi adaptor wasn't recognised what are the chances that support is added any time soon? is it more if someone can be bothered to do it and shares the driver or there's generally a team of people working on on porting drivers to linux?
It's likely supported already.

I had a similar issue with a few laptops last year. To solve:
1) make sure the adapter is on
2) connect via Ethernet, and then go "System>preferences>hardware>additional drivers" and let the GUI do its thing. (This is for MATE, in any other DE, you may want to just search for "drivers")

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is emulation for Microsoft word standard? i have office 2016 pro and would prefer to keep using that.
Nope. Libre office, or open office, is the way to go. Just make sure you copy your fonts across.

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Originally Posted by sir_bazz View Post
Haven't had a linux box since RedHat 6.0 but just setup Mint 18.1 on a spare HDD and wow it's come a long way.

Pretty much everything just worked after install.

Am i missing anything by sticking with the Cinnamon DE ?
Not really. From memory, Cinnamon is one of the heavier DEs, so you might consider another, in the event of low resources, but otherwise overall functionality should be about the same.

Elvis recommends KDE for visual editing software (something about libraries which he understands and explains better than I can), and while he is probably right, at a hobbyist/amateur level like myself, the benefits are not noticeable.
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Old 17th April 2017, 7:24 PM   #287
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Elvis recommends KDE for visual editing software (something about libraries which he understands and explains better than I can)
KDE is the only "heavyweight" DE that allows you to disable OpenGL hardware-accelerated screen compositing.

If you're using a lot of windowed 3D applications, it allows you to ensure GPU power isn't wasted on screen effects, and your application is getting 100% of the GPU power it deserves. Important for people who are doing things like professional 3D (CAD/CAM/DCC/VFX/etc).

I'm not 100% certain, but I have a feeling Unity and GNOME3 (and their derivatives) allow fullscreen 3D applications (including games) to disable the OpenGL compositing, but not windowed applications.
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Old 13th July 2017, 7:36 PM   #288
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Hey guys! I'm really keen to give linux a try outside of virtualbox. I've been playing with Ubuntu but I think it's time to set up a dual boot with Windows 10. I'd go all the way but kind of need Windows for uni/study.

A couple of questions:

I only have a 250gb SSD. Do you think that's enough for both operating systems?

Do you think I should stick with Ubuntu or try something different?

Last edited by altefour; 13th July 2017 at 7:40 PM.
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Old 13th July 2017, 9:16 PM   #289
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How keen are you? You could wait a little bit and run Ubuntu inside your windows install:
https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/10/1...-available-now
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Old 13th July 2017, 9:56 PM   #290
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If you have a spare large-ish USB 3.x stick or SD card (16GB or greater), install to that if you are wanting to take baby steps. That way you don't touch your Windows install at all.

As you get more comfortable, shrink your C: drive down and do a proper install next to Windows.
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Old 14th July 2017, 9:30 AM   #291
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Originally Posted by vellanet View Post
How keen are you? You could wait a little bit and run Ubuntu inside your windows install:
https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/10/1...-available-now
That's awesome. Seems to be already available but I'd rather take steps toward using Ubuntu or Xubuntu as my primary desktop. Thanks for the heads up though, it looks cool.

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Originally Posted by HyRax1 View Post
If you have a spare large-ish USB 3.x stick or SD card (16GB or greater), install to that if you are wanting to take baby steps. That way you don't touch your Windows install at all.

As you get more comfortable, shrink your C: drive down and do a proper install next to Windows.
That's a great idea, thank you.
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Old 16th July 2017, 4:06 PM   #292
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Decided to bite the bullet and install Xubuntu on my primary laptop. Because I opted in for updates and 3rd party software, all seems to be working really well so far.
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Old 16th July 2017, 4:29 PM   #293
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Originally Posted by altefour View Post
Decided to bite the bullet and install Xubuntu on my primary laptop. Because I opted in for updates and 3rd party software, all seems to be working really well so far.
Good stuff. As you get more comfortable with the basics (eg: Linux equivalents for common Windows locations and tasks) then you can start to customise your install with specific apps (same way as you would in Windows with preferred zip program, text editor, etc).

First thing you'll want to do is to unlock the extra software repositories called "multiverse" and "universe". Basically edit the /etc/apt/sources.list file and remove the leading hash symbol on all lines beginning with "deb" and "deb-src". Save and then refresh your software inventory with "sudo apt-get update" in a terminal. There's also a GUI way to do this, but I'll let you Google it up.

Some of my personal favourite customisations to install:
  • htop (to replace top, a text-GUI system monitor for terminals, but on steroids)
  • mc (Midnight Commander - text-GUI tool for terminals)
  • shutter (nice print screen GUI tool)
  • ubuntu-restricted-extras (all extra video/audio codecs and MS fonts)
  • xscreensaver (nice Mac-like screensaver)
  • gimp (Photoshop style image editor)
  • krita (image drawing app on steroids)
  • steam (games!!)
You can install all of the above with one command:
Code:
$ sudo apt-get install htop mc shutter ubuntu-restricted-extras xscreensaver.* gimp krita steam
(the ".*" on the end of "xscreensaver.*" means install all packages that start with "xscreensaver" because you have the program plus extra plugins related to it.)

To install apps like Oracle Java, most vendors will have available what is called a "PPA" or "Personal Package Archive" - this allows you to install the app(s) in question from a reputable source and it also means all future updates will present as normal OS updates.

In the case of Java version 8 (PPA info page here), from a terminal:
  1. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java
  2. sudo apt-get update
  3. sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-installer
The first line adds the Webupd8 PPA to your system. Basically it adds a single text file into /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ which tells your system which URL provides those updates. A GPG signing key will also be added to your keyring to ensure that you don't install any rogue software pretending to be legitimately from those PPA's.

The second line refreshes your software inventory which will include the new PPA.

The third line actually does the physically installation by searching your inventory for a package of the same name and then retrieving it from wherever the index is telling it to (in this case from the Webupd8 PPA).
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Old 16th July 2017, 6:02 PM   #294
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Originally Posted by HyRax1 View Post
Good stuff. As you get more comfortable with the basics (eg: Linux equivalents for common Windows locations and tasks) then you can start to customise your install with specific apps (same way as you would in Windows with preferred zip program, text editor, etc).

First thing you'll want to do is to unlock the extra software repositories called "multiverse" and "universe". Basically edit the /etc/apt/sources.list file and remove the leading hash symbol on all lines beginning with "deb" and "deb-src". Save and then refresh your software inventory with "sudo apt-get update" in a terminal. There's also a GUI way to do this, but I'll let you Google it up.

Some of my personal favourite customisations to install:
  • htop (to replace top, a text-GUI system monitor for terminals, but on steroids)
  • mc (Midnight Commander - text-GUI tool for terminals)
  • shutter (nice print screen GUI tool)
  • ubuntu-restricted-extras (all extra video/audio codecs and MS fonts)
  • xscreensaver (nice Mac-like screensaver)
  • gimp (Photoshop style image editor)
  • krita (image drawing app on steroids)
  • steam (games!!)
You can install all of the above with one command:
Code:
$ sudo apt-get install htop mc shutter ubuntu-restricted-extras xscreensaver.* gimp krita steam
(the ".*" on the end of "xscreensaver.*" means install all packages that start with "xscreensaver" because you have the program plus extra plugins related to it.)

To install apps like Oracle Java, most vendors will have available what is called a "PPA" or "Personal Package Archive" - this allows you to install the app(s) in question from a reputable source and it also means all future updates will present as normal OS updates.

In the case of Java version 8 (PPA info page here), from a terminal:
  1. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java
  2. sudo apt-get update
  3. sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-installer
The first line adds the Webupd8 PPA to your system. Basically it adds a single text file into /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ which tells your system which URL provides those updates. A GPG signing key will also be added to your keyring to ensure that you don't install any rogue software pretending to be legitimately from those PPA's.

The second line refreshes your software inventory which will include the new PPA.

The third line actually does the physically installation by searching your inventory for a package of the same name and then retrieving it from wherever the index is telling it to (in this case from the Webupd8 PPA).
Thanks so much for this! I had a little trouble getting admin access to the source list so I installed gedit and used 'sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list to be able to edit and save. I'm sure there's an easier way but that seemed like the most efficient at the time.

I really like htop and mc! Very handy tools, thank you. I might hold off on installing Steam but it's nice to know I have it available.

Adding repositories doesn't seem all that difficult. Your explanations make perfect sense.

EDIT: I caved! Installing Steam now.

Last edited by altefour; 16th July 2017 at 6:11 PM.
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Old 16th July 2017, 7:36 PM   #295
HyRax1
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Originally Posted by altefour View Post
Thanks so much for this! I had a little trouble getting admin access to the source list so I installed gedit and used 'sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list to be able to edit and save. I'm sure there's an easier way but that seemed like the most efficient at the time.
Yep, that does the trick. If you wanted to do it exclusively in the terminal, then you could use nano instead, which is a terminal-based full-screen editor which is easy to use (nano filename, make changes, then CTRL+X, then Y and then Enter to save those changes).

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Originally Posted by altefour View Post
I really like htop and mc! Very handy tools, thank you.
No worries - only two of dozens of ultra useful tools out there.

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Originally Posted by altefour View Post
EDIT: I caved! Installing Steam now.
lol - nice one! If you have NVidia graphics on your PC, remember to install the NVidia drivers for best performance.

Remember if you are trying to find something specific, you can easily search all 42,000 pieces of software in the repository using a command like the following. Let's say you are looking for tools to suit ThinkPad laptops:

Code:
$ apt-cache search thinkpad
...and now let's refine that further to only show ThinkPad tools related to batteries:
Code:
$ apt-cache search thinkpad | grep battery
Anyway, sounds like you're having fun, so keep exploring!
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Old 17th July 2017, 7:47 AM   #296
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Originally Posted by HyRax1 View Post
Yep, that does the trick. If you wanted to do it exclusively in the terminal, then you could use nano instead, which is a terminal-based full-screen editor which is easy to use (nano filename, make changes, then CTRL+X, then Y and then Enter to save those changes).
Wow, yeah that's definitely quicker. I'll work on getting comfortable with it.

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Originally Posted by HyRax1 View Post
lol - nice one! If you have NVidia graphics on your PC, remember to install the NVidia drivers for best performance.
It's an Acer Aspire V3 with an onboard 520. Nothing special, but there're plenty of low spec linux compatible games to play through.

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Originally Posted by HyRax1 View Post
Remember if you are trying to find something specific, you can easily search all 42,000 pieces of software in the repository using a command like the following.
That's actually really helpful,thanks! Grep is cool too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by HyRax1 View Post
Anyway, sounds like you're having fun, so keep exploring!
So much fun. Cheers for all the help!
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Old 18th July 2017, 10:39 AM   #297
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I got sick of problems with Windows 10 on a HP 2170p laptop. All it's used for is internet browsing and occasional word processing.

For this sort of basic use, Ubuntu 16.04 works perfectly out of the box, including suspend/resume and hotkeys which were causing me headaches in Windows 10 due to driver issues...
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Old 21st July 2017, 1:21 PM   #298
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I don't know where else to put this without creating a new thread so sorry if it doesn't fit.

I'm studying a Cert IV in Computer Systems and the amount of bile re linux I hear coming out of my C# tutor is enough to make me dislike him to the point of phasing out anything useful he has to say (which is rare).
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Old 21st July 2017, 2:26 PM   #299
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Originally Posted by altefour View Post
I don't know where else to put this without creating a new thread so sorry if it doesn't fit.

I'm studying a Cert IV in Computer Systems and the amount of bile re linux I hear coming out of my C# tutor is enough to make me dislike him to the point of phasing out anything useful he has to say (which is rare).
TAFE college?

Uneducated lecturer who is MS certified, I bet your course also sits MS Cert exam as part of the curricular?

MS nutjobs are just anxious because the world is moving away from their sphere of knowledge to cloud based solutions where MS offerings are inferior and 10yrs behind.
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Old 22nd July 2017, 11:45 AM   #300
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TAFE college?

Uneducated lecturer who is MS certified, I bet your course also sits MS Cert exam as part of the curricular?

MS nutjobs are just anxious because the world is moving away from their sphere of knowledge to cloud based solutions where MS offerings are inferior and 10yrs behind.
Yep, Box Hill Tafe. MS 10, ccna, and A+ are what they're "teaching" at the moment. Didn't mean to derail the topic of this thread. Just wanted to express my annoyance.
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