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Old 23rd February 2017, 8:57 PM   #451
wraith.50
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Originally Posted by Kosti View Post
So with Conductonaut, if its not suitable for Aluminum, what metal is the IHS on the 7700K and what about the die of the CPU what is this material?

I need to check my EK waterblock too to make sure its not in anyway aluminum

Maybe Conductonaut has awesome thermal properties but damn scary if it reacts to Aluminum..so perhaps Kyronaut could be a better option since its not reactive albeit lower thermal properties

EDIT - answered my own questions LOL

The heatspreader of actual processors consists of nickel-plated copper, not of aluminum.
You want to use Conductonaut under the IHS between it and the cpu die, and Kryonaut on top of the IHS between it and your cpu waterblock.

Using Kryonaut between the IHS and the die, will not give you as significant a temperature drop as Conductonaut. Plus a non conductive TIM will also pump out over a short period of time and will then need to be reapplied.
Liquid metals do not have this problem.

If you decide to use Kapton tape, this is what it looks like applied in the red circle and how much you need to cover the pads.

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Old 23rd February 2017, 9:01 PM   #452
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kosti View Post
So with Conductonaut, if its not suitable for Aluminum, what metal is the IHS on the 7700K and what about the die of the CPU what is this material?

I need to check my EK waterblock too to make sure its not in anyway aluminum

Maybe Conductonaut has awesome thermal properties but damn scary if it reacts to Aluminum..so perhaps Kyronaut could be a better option since its not reactive albeit lower thermal properties

EDIT - answered my own questions LOL

The heatspreader of actual processors consists of nickel-plated copper, not of aluminum.
I saw a few pix the other day, can't find them now, of a stock intel aluminium HSF which had been used with Conductonaut.
Aluminium really does not like Conductonaut.... majorly messed up.. in fact it looked like parts of the base had actually dissolved.

Fortunately, only the cheapest of HSF's use aluminium bases.. I doubt Intel has for years now? I certainly can't see most people on this site using a crappy full aluminium heatsink in conjunction with a mega expensive TIM.
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Old 23rd February 2017, 9:18 PM   #453
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Originally Posted by wraith.50 View Post
You want to use Conductonaut under the IHS between it and the cpu die, and Kryonaut on top of the IHS between it and your cpu waterblock.

Using Kryonaut between the IHS and the die, will not give you as significant a temperature drop as Conductonaut. Plus a non conductive TIM will also pump out over a short period of time and will then need to be reapplied.
Liquid metals do not have this problem.

If you decide to use Kapton tape, this is what it looks like applied in the red circle and how much you need to cover the pads.

image
I was thinking of using high temperature heat resistant Polyimide Tape across the entire CPU and just leave the 7700K die exposed for the Grizzly Conductonaut, thanks for the picture

Thanks too Ratzz, its like u said, they now use a nickel-plated copper HS

So will this liquid eventually drip or move since most desktop PC's are vertically built leaving the gravity to do it's thing? I don't want to re-apply every few months
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Old 23rd February 2017, 9:44 PM   #454
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Originally Posted by Kosti View Post
I was thinking of using high temperature heat resistant Polyimide Tape across the entire CPU and just leave the 7700K die exposed for the Grizzly Conductonaut, thanks for the picture

Thanks too Ratzz, its like u said, they now use a nickel-plated copper HS

So will this liquid eventually drip or move since most desktop PC's are vertically built leaving the gravity to do it's thing? I don't want to re-apply every few months
No there is no need to cover the whole cpu with kapton tape.

No the liquid metal will not move or drip. You only have to apply a very small amount of it and spread it out thinly and evenly.

The following video shows a good method for applying liquid metal tim to the die and the IHS. The masking tape method used in the video, works very well for making sure you don't get any on the pcb, especially for those who don't have a steady hand and also results in a very neat squared off application.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwg0HRw17lY

Last edited by wraith.50; 23rd February 2017 at 9:48 PM.
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Old 24th February 2017, 6:24 PM   #455
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@wraith

Thanks for that, problem is I can't find any Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut Thermal Paste anywhere in Sydney, WTF, who purchased it all
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Old 24th February 2017, 7:48 PM   #456
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Why do you guys use a copper heatspreader when the waterblock is already copper? Why add more thermal resistance? Is it to protect the core?
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Old 24th February 2017, 9:31 PM   #457
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Why do you guys use a copper heatspreader when the waterblock is already copper? Why add more thermal resistance? Is it to protect the core?
It's more just the die surface is lower than the surrounding socket and nothing fits so it's a million times easier to relid and reuse stock mounting kits

The layers of metal/alloy in the IHS add exceedingly minimal thermal resistance anyway. Mobile chips don't have IHS ... because thin ... and mount blocks straight on top of dies and it really only causes problems from poor factory QC on heatsinks that don't fit properly (latest gen alienwares and the odd Clevo) and temp spikes from terrible TIM are exacerbated. I've not come across a single story of a cracked die from too much pressure in 10 years of fiddling with laptops and hanging around their various forums
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Old Yesterday, 2:01 AM   #458
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Originally Posted by bennyg View Post
It's more just the die surface is lower than the surrounding socket and nothing fits so it's a million times easier to relid and reuse stock mounting kits

The layers of metal/alloy in the IHS add exceedingly minimal thermal resistance anyway. Mobile chips don't have IHS ... because thin ... and mount blocks straight on top of dies and it really only causes problems from poor factory QC on heatsinks that don't fit properly (latest gen alienwares and the odd Clevo) and temp spikes from terrible TIM are exacerbated. I've not come across a single story of a cracked die from too much pressure in 10 years of fiddling with laptops and hanging around their various forums
Umm may wanna think about heavy coolers and people dropping them onto the die, think back to the amd days. Your not placing a 1kg plus heat sink on a notebook cpu, I've seen and herd of many damaged but maily due to smashing/dropping a sharp edge of a heavy heatsink down on the die. Pressure no though, i haven't herd of that or seen yet, just accidents from dropping heatsinks ect. Amd also used 4 feet to stop the heatsink if it wasnt flush hitting any capacitors on the top next to the die.
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Old Today, 9:10 AM   #459
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I've not come across a single story of a cracked die from too much pressure in 10 years of fiddling with laptops and hanging around their various forums
Used to happen all the time, ecspecially with the old AMD stuff (Athlon XP in particular) before IHS were a thing.

I haven't seen it happen recently but I'd say that's more to do with the IHS being used these days and socket/heat sink design being largely idiot proof now.

I have no doubt it could still happen though.
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Old Today, 9:41 AM   #460
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Naked mounts are finicky anyway. Its not just a matter of crushing the chip, you also need to apply even pressure over the whole PCB or the pins won't connect properly. You really need a chip height spacer on the outer edges of the PCB so your block is creating even pressure on the whole PCB. I've seen a video of someone successfully using layers of masking tape to achieve this, not sure that's what I would use though.

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