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Old Yesterday, 1:20 PM   #46
syahrr01
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There's different forms of Vitamin B3 supplements in the marketplace, including: NR, niacinamide, niacin and inositol hexaniacinate. It's unclear to me which forms is attributable to benefit for which study.
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Old Today, 10:57 AM   #47
antipody Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syahrr01 View Post
There's different forms of Vitamin B3 supplements in the marketplace, including: NR, niacinamide, niacin and inositol hexaniacinate. It's unclear to me which forms is attributable to benefit for which study.
My understanding is that they all convert to NAD+, which is the key energy carrier and conenzyme for DNA repair, so it shouldn't matter too much which form you take. However, the holder of the NR patent disagrees...
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There are only two steps in the NR pathway to NAD but there are two genes that can do the first step and three genes that can do the second step. The NR pathway never gets turned off. NRK1 is expressed in every cell and tissue, while NRK2 is turned on by cellular damage, particularly in skeletal and cardiac muscle. This means that people supplementing with NR are able to keep NAD levels high in stressed cells that specifically have the NR pathway turned on to deal with cellular stress. Supplementing with niacin and nicotinamide doesn't help because they don't feed into the NR pathway, which is turned on by stresses.
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First, niacin can't be used in lots of tissues because the niacin pathway is not on. The brain and skeletal muscle can't use niacin to boost NAD and these are two of the most important tissues that suffer the ravages of aging. Niacin also causes flushing at high doses and does not efficiently elevate mitochondrial NAD.

The nicotinamide pathway declines in aging, which means you would need ever higher doses to try to maintain your NAD. Second, at high doses, nicotinamide inhibits sirtuins, which is the opposite of NR. NR is a STAC that extends lifespan in model systems.
https://seekingalpha.com/article/404...ive-vitamin-b3

One thing to keep in mind is that Niacin can be toxic at high doses. I don't think this is the case with NR.

More on the Victor Chang Institute and birth defect study here:

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/...et_cid=1487863

Fascinating...

Last edited by antipody; Today at 11:04 AM.
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