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Old 6th May 2016, 7:47 PM   #1
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Default Asus Strix R9 390x DirectCU III OC 8GB - User Review

Asus Strix R9 390x DirectCU III OC 8GB - User Review




Introduction

Hello again! Today I am here to show you the Asus Strix R9 390X 8GB DirectCU III. It’s big and powerful. The card is based on full AMD Hawaii core, featuring 2086 stream processors, attached to a 512-bit memory bus with 8GB of GDDR5 RAM attached for anything you can possibly throw at it. Originally the core featured in the R9 290X on release a couple of years back, but has now been refined to allow for a more power friendly design allowing for a little extra in base core clocks.

Asus has completely redesigned the layout for the power delivery, and provided an upgraded cooling solution featuring its new DirectCU III cooler. Power delivery is through an 8-phase setup featuring Asus Super Alloy II components for smooth power delivery and minimal electrical noise.

Seriously though, this card is massive. Compared to my EVGA 780 Ti SSC with ACS Cooler, it practically dwarfs it. It’s clean and appealing to the eye, and has no sharp edges to cut your hands on. The DirectCU III cooler used features the same 0dB setup as the previous generation DirectCU II heatsink, allowing for silent operation during normal PC use, such as internet browsing, general workstation use and video viewing. The sheer size of the cooler is enough to understand how this is possible. When you first look at it, the main thing that stands out is the Strix logo on the back plate, then the two (2) massive 10mm heat pipes entwined with 3 smaller 8mm heat pipes to take all of that volcanic heat from the copper heatsink core away to the aluminium fin array.

Features are well in line with the current range of video cards on the market. The card itself features support for DirectX12, Mantle, OpenGL 4.5, OpenCL 2.0 and AMD’s GCN 1.1 Stream processors.





Specifications









Features / Software

AUTO-EXTREME TECHNOLOGY

I mentioned this back in my GTX 960 Strix Review (found here : http://forums.overclockers.com.au/sh....php?t=1188878 ), so those who read through, you can probably skip over this sections.

Asus have taken things a little further with a complete ground-up design based around Auto-Extreme Technology. This is a first for the industry. The one thing I find that stands out with Asus products is the persistence in being market leaders in not only design and performance, but also its manufacturing process.

Basically, Asus has developed an automated system for the production of its products and have removed the ‘human error’ factor and increased quality control of the products. In the process they have saved the workers from all those harsh gases released with the use of flux. Don’t look at this the wrong way, it’s a win-win for all. We, the end users can purchase a product of a very high quality standard, and for the workers in the factory, they no longer will have their lives shortened from breathing the deadly fumes every day.

The final product is a nice neat looking card with fantastic quality control and a more reliable unit. All pluses in my books.

Here is a video to explain the process better.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gRpuurPsuc



GPU Tweak II Software

Included with all Asus Graphics cards is their own GPU Tweak software. I mentioned it in my previous review of the Asus GTX 960 Strix 2GB (Link - http://forums.overclockers.com.au/sh....php?t=1188878)
Initial setup was quick and simple. The layout is very easy to navigate and customise to suit what you want to see/use. The setup menu allows for keyboard shortcuts, and also to decide on start-up options. Another option is to unlock further settings past the limited clock, power, and memory settings for the more advanced users looking to push things further than most.







Factory profiles are included for:
Silent operation (a slightly under-clocked setting)







Gaming (which is the default clock speeds)







OC (a minor overclocked setting)







Or User Profile, which can be setup and saved to suit yourself, or you can add extras to suit your own personal needs.







Attached to the main tab is the monitoring graphs, which are customizable for layout and what you would like included. This can be docked to the main settings, or unlocks to place on your desktop wherever you choose.






There is also a Game Booster option. This is supposed to be helpful to reduce the OS overhead to assist in increasing frame rates. Honestly, I gave this a go myself to see if it made a difference, but for me, there was no change. I can see that on some systems, where they are older or more bloated that it could have a measurable effect. I would say it didn’t an effect on mine as it was a clean install, with nothing needing optimizing.





Photos / Comments

The product comes well packaged in a cardboard box, with sufficient packing around to ensure there is little chance for it to be damaged.







Inside the box we have the graphics card itself, power splitter cable, driver CD, manual and a cool Strix Sticker. The accessories are supplied in a nicely designed box for safety and adds that little bit of luxury to the packaging. The card is also neatly packed into a foam enclosure to add the feel that this card is a little more special than most.







Moving onto the cooler, as alluded to earlier this is the “BIG” feature of this card. The three (3) fans measure 75mm. Two (2) huge 10mm heat pipes take most of the heat from the core, with an additional three (3) 8mm copper heat pipes aiding to transfer the heat from the GPU core. The GPU core makes direct contact with the copper core of the heat sink and extracted via the copper heat pipes to the aluminium fin array. There is also what appears to be a solid finned heat sink to cover and spread the heat of the VRM componentry. For those that love a little bling, the Strix logo located on the side is nicely lit using a white pulsing light and really brings it to life.

Asus have also adopted a brushed black anodised aluminium back plate to aid in cooling the rear of the PCB. The added benefit is the support it gives the graphics card from excess sag like some due to its sheer size and weight. That, and it just looks damn cool with the grey Asus and Strix logos. Overall, the card measures 30cm in length and 15cm in width.







The power delivery for the card is supplied through both an 8-pin and 6-pin connectors, located on the rear edge. Asus have used their Super Alloy Power II component for the power delivery, featuring an 8-phase setup for cleaner power supply and longevity. Above the power connectors, there is red indicator LED’s which change to white when the power is connected correctly. The connectors are also rotated 180° from the usual, with a little notch in the PCB. This makes removal of the power a lot easier than other cards.

Asus recommends a minimum of 750W power supply. Crossfire no longer requires the bridge of old, with the drivers taking care of everything over the PCI-E lanes.








There are plenty of rear connectors and the rear bracket includes a small exhaust vent to help remove a small amount of heat. It includes four (4) different connectors: 1 dual link DVI-D, 1 x HDMI 1.4a and 3 x display port 1.2 outputs.

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Old 6th May 2016, 7:47 PM   #2
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Test Setup

My GPU test rig uses an Intel i7 6700K overclocked to 4.5 GHz on both core and cache, with the Vcore set to 1.35V. Being a modern processor with up to 8 threads available, the chance of a CPU bottleneck on this system is minimal. The CPU is paired up with a set of G.Skill Ripjaws V 3466C16 RAM in a 4 x 4GB configuration, with the timings set to XMP with all timings locked to reduce the chance of change between reboots, and all connected to an Asus ROG Maximus VIII Hero motherboard (see my review here).

Power comes from a Silverstone Strider Gold Evolution 1200W, to ensure there is no starvation of available power. Cooling for the CPU is taken care of by a custom loop, consisting of an EK Supremacy Evo CPU block, D5 pump housed in a XSPC dual bay reservoir, Alphacool XT45 420 3 x 140mm radiator with BitFenix 140mm Spectre Pro PWM fans set to low. The GPU’s are installed within a Corsair Obsidian 750D, with the side of the case removed, more for access and to allow clean air for repeated benchmark runs.

Most of my results are from the use of built-in benchmarks, and for those that do not, I have come up with some manually played sections which I have recorded the results with the use of FRAPS. The benchmarks are repeated 3 times to ensure repeatability and provide an average for the figures provided for Minimum and Average frames per second. For all benchmarks excluding Crysis 3, Windows 10 Pro 64bit is used. Windows 7 Pro x64 is used for Crysis 3 due to compatibility issues.

For Nvidia graphics cards, I have used the in-built Dynamic Super Resolution (DSR) for 1440p benchmarking due to being limited to a 1080p monitor. For AMD graphics cards, the Virtual Super Resolution (VSR) feature was enabled in order to test the higher resolutions.

All overclocked results are based on three (3) passes of Unigine Heaven Xtreme, and overclocked results are shown within the 1080p result graphs. The software used for overclocking and monitoring is Asus GPU Tweak II.

Test System

• CPU: Intel i7-6700K at 4.5GHz (45 x 100MHz)
• Motherboard: Asus ROG Maximus VIII Hero
• Memory: 4 x 4GB G.Skill Ripjaws V 3466C16 (XMP Profile)
• PSU: Silverstone Strider Gold Evolution 1200W
• SSD: Samsung 840 250GB
• Case: Corsair Obsidian 750D
• CPU cooler: Custom water loop
• Operating system: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit / Windows 7 Pro 64-bit

Nvidia Graphics Cards

• EVGA GeForce GTX 780 ti – 1204MHz Boost, 8GHz GDDR5 (GeForce 358.50)
(Note, this card is pre-overclocked due to a custom bios, no memory timings have been adjusted, just base clock and boost removed)
• Asus GeForce GTX 960 Strix - 1254MHz GPU (1317MHz boost), 7.2GHz GDDR5 (GeForce 355.82)
• Asus GeForce GTX 750 ti OC – 1072MHz GPU (1150MHz Boost), 5.4GHz GDDR5 (GeForce 358.50)

AMD Graphics Cards

• Asus Radeon R7 370 Strix 4GB - 1,050MHz GPU, 5.6GHz GDDR5 (Catalyst 15.8 driver)
• Asus Radeon R9 390X Strix 8GB - 1,070MHz GU, 6.0GHz GDDR5 (Catalyst 15.8 driver)



GPU CHARTS

GAMING BENCHMARKS
Games tested:
Battlefield 4
Fallout 4
Grand Thief Auto V
Tomb Raider
Middle-Earth - Shadow of Mordor
Alien: Isolation
Metro 2033 Redux
Crysis 3


Battlefield 4

Battlefield 4 is my go-to game and I literally book time during the week to play this. For this, I use the start-up sequence for Shanghai. It’s full of DOF changes, lots of lighting, water, texture rich, facial close-ups… The works really. It’s a timed run using FRAPS for 110 seconds, from the moment you walk through the door to the loading bay until the RHIB drops into the water.







Fallout 4

Fallout 4 is lacking a built-in benchmark. A little disappointing, but at least we can get an actual run through to give a more accurate feel of the game. For this, I have a run through near the beginning of the game, with sections which have little overhead to show the highest frames achievable, to lots of forest and water, to groups of people and some nuclear fallout.

It was also necessary to make changes to some .ini files to disable v-sync, something that is not easy to change in-game, and every change to resolution or settings results in v-sync being enabled again. I had to double check every time that it was not affecting the results. So beware! FRAPS is used to record the data.







Grand Thief Auto V

GTA V results are taken from the 5th built-in benchmark test. As the game engine does not have any pre-set graphic profiles, I have come up with a custom setting to stress the GPU’s but also try to keep it repeatable between the differing architectures. As the game engine runs with varied population and vehicles in the city, there can be a fair difference between runs, so this was run 3 times with an average result listed. GPU memory use is a big one on this title, so the more you have, the more eye candy you can adopt.

Settings are:
FXAA – on
MSAA, Vsync off,
Texture quality - very high
Shader quality – high
Shadow and reflection quality – normal
Reflection MSAA – off
Water Quality – high
Particle and grass quality – very high
Soft shadows – soft
Post FX – ultra
In-game DOF effects – on
Anisotropic filtering – X16
Ambient occlusion – high
Tessellation – very high







Tomb Raider

Fantastic game; lots of foliage, hair effects, cloth, texture – it has it all. The benchmarks are run on the Ultra pre-set on 1080p and 1440p utilizing the built-in benchmark for repeatability.







Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor

Quite a taxing game, especially at higher resolutions and definitely brings all of the cards to their knees. As I only have access to a 1080p monitor, I have taken advantage of Nvidia’s DSR (Dynamic Super Resolution) and AMD’s VSR (Virtual Super Resolution) in order to test higher resolutions. This worked out to be 2880 x 1620, so the performance shown will be tougher than the 1440p standard. The Ultra pre-set was used. It appears that 2GB cards seem to suffer at this setting, so the 3GB+ cards have a little breathing room.







Alien: Isolation

A game that runs just like the movie of old. Full of suspense and impending death, this game can really get the heart going in places. There are lots of lighting effects, and tessellation to really tax the graphics settings. Alien: Isolation is getting a little old now, but it is still a good title to push modern graphics card to the limits and provide scope for comparison.

For this title, I again utilised the built-in benchmark. The score represents the results from the 5 separate tests involved while using the Ultra Graphics pre-set.







Metro 2033 Redux

Metro is a nice little Post-Apocalyptic FPS. Lots of environmental effects, lighting, and physics with a good story behind it all. Basically like the original, but tweaked using the setup from Last Light.

The Benchmark is run using the built-in tool. Quality setting on very high, with no SSAA, AF set to 4X, normal motion blur, very high Tessellation, and with Vsync and PhysX set to off. Each graphics setting is run 3 times, and the average recorded in the graph below.







Crysis 3

Can it run Crysis?

Well, here we find out. Crysis 3 is still one of the most graphically intensive and taxing games around, and will bring even the top tier cards down to show their worth. Here, I run the game at very high settings, with a run through based on one of the checkpoints on the way to the Railroad, in the Welcome to the Jungle chapter. All results are recorded using Fraps, with the average of three (3) runs recorded.







SYNTHETIC BENCHMARKS

Software used:
Futuremark 3DMark11
Futuremark 3DMark Firestrike
Futuremark 3DMark Firestrike Extreme
LuxMark v3.1 – Hotel (Complex Scene)
Unigine Heaven – Basic
Unigine Heaven – Extreme
Unigine Valley – Extreme HD
Cinebench R15 – OpenGL



























POWER, HEAT AND SOUND MEASUREMENTS

Power measurements are taken as the peak load power recorded during Unigine Heaven Extreme. This provides a good deal of power usage to cover most situations. Some games may require extra power over this, but it is a very good baseline.

Due to the nature of electronics, the usage of power is greatly dependant on CPU type, voltage and speed, number of system fans, hard drives, the PSU itself, and other connected peripherals. This measurement is purely a guide for what this particular test system achieves. Always refer to the manufacturer’s guides for the minimum PSU requirements to suit the GPU.





Sound Measurements are taken using an iPhone app, by Skypa. My room in quiet times flattens at 55dB with just the main system in idle, all case fans on low, and with the phone located 30cm away from the case position. The base system itself is barely audible, with only the usual fan hum and D5 pump noise.





Temperature measurements are via the Asus software suite, GPU Tweak II. Measurement was taken before and after 2 runs of Unigine Heaven Xtreme Benchmark for maximum heat soak. The side of the computer case was left off for the duration of the tests, with an average room temperature of 28°C. All fan setting were left on the software’s Default Auto Settings.





Overclocking

As mentioned earlier, Asus bundle its very own GPU Tweak II software with its gaming cards. I utilised this software as well as Unigine Heaven in order to find what I would class as a Safe 24/7 overclock. Generally, this meant leaving Unigine Heaven in the Extreme pre-set to loop for 2 hours and not experience any artefacts or driver crashes.

The Asus Strix R9 390X is already a strong card, featuring a small 20MHz overclock from the factory. Honestly, the factory I believe has already pushed this chip toward the maximum for the consumers, so an overclock isn’t particularly necessary. On top of this, I have managed to push this sample to and extra 100MHz overclock, reaching 1150MHz stable in my testing. This was not without issue though, and was only achieved with the side of my case removed to keep the temperatures in check for the VRM system.

Simply put, heat is this GPU’s biggest enemy. For those of you that are familiar with the Hawaii GCN1.1 core at the heart of the Radeon R9 290/290X/390/390X, this statement regarding the significant heat generation will not be news to you. This heat related issue isn’t unique to the Strix card but a trait of all air cooled Hawaii based GPUs. None the less, even with the heat generation, Hawaii based GPUs offer solid value for the pixel pushing power delivered at this price point. Then consider the added features beyond the reference design and the Strix R9 390X is no exception to this value rule. Furthermore, add a water block and your enemy disappears.

Onto the memory side of things, the GDDR5 deployed is rated at 6000MHz from the factory, left unchanged from the reference models. This was easily able to be pushed all the way up to 6600MHz, a good 600MHz over the factory setting. This could be pushed further, but the gains were minimal and artefacting was a common occurrence, so not suggested.






And a tweaked 3DMark11 performance run breaking the 20k barrier. Obviously done higher than tested earlier, but this is to show how far this particular sample could be pushed as is.

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Old 6th May 2016, 7:48 PM   #3
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Conclusion

When looking for a video card, I have several things I look for. Basically, I want a card that’s powerful, cool, well priced, has overclocking headroom and I can run whatever I want at whatever setting I wish. The Asus Strix R9 390X does most of these, minus the “cool” factor. This isn’t the fault of the design though, more the fact that the Hawaii core beneath the cooler is a fire-breathing demon.

Asus has done a great job in my opinion to take what essentially is a wild animal to refine it to a finessed cheetah. The cooler is a great design, with the incorporation of the extra-large heat pipes and 0dB fan profile for a silent idle. I feel Asus had a very good idea what was required to cool this card, and the sheer size of the cooler is testament to this.

The inclusion of 8GB of GDDR5 RAM is a godsend for those which are pushing the higher resolution monitors, especially those with 4K. Coupled with the 512-bit memory bus, this is where the R9 390X shines. I feel the extra memory is where both Nvidia and AMD need to be heading, as gaming these days is getting harder and harder on the memory system. Couple that with 4K monitors becoming ever more affordable, it’s only a matter of time that the 2GB and 3GB cards just won’t cut it anymore for upcoming titles.

Now, this is a big card and it has a big cooler. For me, I found mostly from the size that I had some trouble being able to use my thumb screws to secure the card to my case. Some might not see this as an issue, but the angle where the PCI slot bracket is located just made it very difficult for me to fit the screw in and turn it. Probably not an issue if using a screwdriver, but I prefer to work tool-less.

For benching, I had some trouble running higher, but in some instances the GPU was happy to pass at 1200MHz, but it was all dependent on heat saturation. Asus have deployed a very efficient cooling solution to attempt to tame the beast, but in reality if you want to overclock this card, my suggestion is a water block to suit plumbed into your loop. It has more to give, but it needs the extra cooling to accommodate it.

For those using OpenCL based programs, there isn’t really a consumer card as capable as this. This is where I feel AMD is ahead of the pack, and we have all seen the movement over the past years with their products being the highlight of most Bit-coin mining setups. They really are that much faster than the opposition in this regard.

Driver-wise, I had some issues. There was swearing, especially mid-gun fight when the old DirectX error appeared, but going through and finding the right set of drivers got me back on track. The drivers I found that worked the best in my situation were Catalyst 15.8. These cleared a lot of my crashes up.

Overall, I found that the Asus Strix R9 390X could do everything I threw at it. A lot of times while playing my beloved Battlefield 4, I found myself un-aware that I was running at Ultra, where I would normally have my graphics set on high to make sure my framerates were always high.

This is a tough one. For me, I feel the performance is great, which is what you would expect from a top-tier card, but the main let down is the heat and the power efficiency. Nvidia have won the race here, with the GTX970 having equal performance for me at 1080p and 1440p resolutions, better drivers, power consumption and heat. That said, on the other-hand, if you are looking for the higher resolutions, the R9 390X is the winner here for value for money.

Considering 4K displays dropping in price and the high resolution performance from this unit, the similar spec little brother, the Asus Strix R9 390 (still using 8GB GDDR5 through a 512-bit memory bus), becomes an interesting prospect for a dual-GPU solution. For those wanting a high performance, high resolution setup but still mindful of cost, a CrossFire configuration of the Asus Strix R9 390 could be a really nice bang-for-buck option for a little over a grand. But then you have to rely on AMD delivering drivers with CrossFire ready game profiles… and that’s a whole other discussion and area of consideration. For now, what can be told from the testing done in this review is that the Asus Strix R9 390X DirectCU III 8GB graphics card is a strong performer presenting good value in the higher ranks of the product stack.

The Asus Strix R9 390X DirectCU III 8GB can be found at most local computer stores, with a price in the range of $570 to $600 AUD. (search http://www.staticice.com.au/cgi-bin/...wadres=1&pos=2 )





I hope you enjoyed my review. Please feel free to comment/question in the thread below.
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Last edited by headin2001; 6th May 2016 at 8:03 PM.
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Old 6th May 2016, 8:03 PM   #4
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Ohh I like that voltage slider. How many volts can be cranked into it and is that the case with all the top end strix cards?

After seeing that my next card is a ROG top ender for sure
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Old 6th May 2016, 8:07 PM   #5
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It has a limit like all cards do mate, but with the extended voltages, really helps I think, if you are looking at chilled/frozen cooling that is
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Old 6th May 2016, 8:18 PM   #6
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It ran a nice 3DM11 score. Beats my 980 @ 1.4v 1605MHz on the GPU score. Nice overall you got too.

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Old 6th May 2016, 8:23 PM   #7
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HA, must be my mad tweaking skillz.

Good case of SL>IV-E and W7 smashed W10 too!
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Old 6th May 2016, 10:27 PM   #8
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Yeah couldnt be bothered hooking up my W7 drive so just messing with W10. terrible physics too a decent run is up around 16k on this.
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Old 7th May 2016, 4:01 AM   #9
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Far out you do a top notch review mate. Cover everything!
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Old 7th May 2016, 3:24 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robbo2 View Post
Far out you do a top notch review mate. Cover everything!
I try mate. There's a lot out there that doesn't get covered so I just look at it and write what I see and find out about it.

Hell of a lot of work though. Glad you enjoyed the content.
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Old 7th May 2016, 7:01 PM   #11
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Awesome reviews mate. I like how detailed they are !!
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