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Old 25th March 2017, 1:51 PM   #1
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Default Bleckers' Sunbeam BT2600 Controleo2 PCB Reflow Oven (Finished)

Continuing from this thread, I have decided to document the build process for my Controleo based reflow oven.



Parts list:

$67 - Thermal tape and mat - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$59 - Sunbeam oven from JB - https://www.jbhifi.com.au/whitegoods...ll-oven/34577/
$105 - Controleo controller - http://www.whizoo.com/buy
$7 - Boost cartridge heating element - http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/191687060719
$7 - Eye bolts - Bunnings
$5 - Toggle switch - https://www.jaycar.com.au/spst-ip56-...witch/p/ST0581
$15 - Futaba S3003 Standard Servo - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Optional $33 - Convection motor (with a custom made fan) - http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/WESTINGHO...YAAOSwSlBYwfiY


From the junk bin:
Crydom D2440d
Misc panels and brackets
Misc crimp connectors

Last edited by bleckers; 20th April 2017 at 11:18 PM.
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Old 25th March 2017, 1:51 PM   #2
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Default Dismantling the Sunbeam BT2600

Here's the oven:





Notice the crumb tray on the left which comes out from the bottom of the unit. Keep this as we will be using it as the reflow tray later on as it fits nicely into the tray guides (the plastic handle just has a couple of screws which you will need to remove):



OK, onto dismantling/teardown. This unit is reasonably easy to take apart, however there are a few small gotchas.

First place the unit on its front and remove the following screws shown in red (keep track of the screws with nuts as some have them and some don't):



The rivets shown in blue need to be drilled out as well. They just hold the plastic cord holders, so we can just discard these.

Now place the unit upside down and remove the screws shown in red (keep track of the sizes here as some are of different size). There are small rubber grommet feet which you will need to pull out first before accessing some of the screws:



The screws shown in green are torx security screws, you can remove these with a 3.5mm flathead screwdriver reasonably easily.

Place the unit upright and remove the following screws:



Now start lifting the front bezel as shown:



Keep lifting the front bezel until you reach the other side. The front bezel has a spring for the door, which you will need to lift against, just giving it a bit of force will have the outside cover pop off easily:



Once you do that the outside cover pretty much just comes right off.

Remove the spring and front bezel:



And now you're inside.

Here's a picture of the main control area. Now all the clicking and sparking makes sense when I switched this oven on to test before opening. When switching on for the first time it did release a fair bit of smoke in the first couple of minutes (this is normal), so do so in a well ventilated area.



And the other side. Notice the elements are connected in series, so this being a 1400W oven, each series element is going to be 700W@240V, so you need a solid state relay capable of switching about 3 Amps for the separate top and bottom channels of the Controleo:



The elements are metal resistive elements rather than Quartz. I will be testing it out first to see how the heating performance is before going down the path of ordering Quartz elements.

Edit: The top elements both have a resistance of 36Ohms, and the bottom elements have a resistance of 48Ohms each. This more accurately equates to the top elements drawing 3.3A and the bottom drawing 2.5A.

As for a quick review, this is a very cheaply made unit with cost cutting everywhere (notice all the unshielded 240V work going on inside it), but it seems sturdy enough. The door doesn't sit flush with the chassis, so we will need to seal that up and when the crumb tray is removed, there is a large gap which we will cover with thermal tape:



The knob ends just pop off with a flathead screwdriver, and you can remove the control modules after removing their screws:



I'm going to keep the front panel and use the lights to indicate power and boost element operation. I'll be putting a big clunky mains switch in the top dial area and the controller over the lower dial area.

Note, the front panel silkscreen comes off with a bit of Acetone:


Last edited by bleckers; 25th March 2017 at 9:01 PM.
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Old 25th March 2017, 1:52 PM   #3
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Default Installation

I don't plan on performing a complete how to guide since there is a comprehensive build guide on the Whizoo site. This will just detail what I've done to fit it in the BT2600. Hopefully it gives someone some ideas for their own build.

Test fit of the Solid State Relays and the Controleo (I plan to put a small strip of aluminum with thermal tape between the SSRs and rear elements to reflect heat, the mains connectors will be on the other side too than what's in this pic):



Nice big clunky mains switch:



I am still deciding whether to mount the controller at the top or at the bottom at an angle.

The SSRs are a Crydom D2440d mounted on a 170x60x4mm panel at the rear on 12mm standoffs. The reason for mounting them at the rear is to allow ample space for a convection fan and speed controller I plan on installing, plus there is also a vent at the back and top of the chassis, which allows airflow. Depending on how hot it gets, I may end up mounting a small fan, but testing will tell.

-----------------------------------

I have decided to mount the controller on the bottom:



With a small bracket made of 1mm stainless, which is rigid enough:



-----------------------------------

The fan motor and boost element arrived yesterday.



I also got some eye bolts:



Here's the boost element installed:



I'm still figuring the best way to fit the fan inside the unit, however from first glance there is plenty of room to mount the motor. I still need to make up a new fan for it and develop a speed controller for it. Oven fans use a shaded pole motor, so most triac based fan speed controllers will work.

-----------------------------------

And now I've got all the elements wired up (ignore the missing ground lug, that will be on there tomorrow). It's all working! There's also a small sheet of stainless at the back to shield the SSRs from the heat of the internal casing.



Note that there will be a bit of smoke as the elements burn off whatever crap is left on there. Yes you will shit yourself.

-----------------------------------

Here's the motor installed and all the wiring finished (I will tidy it up shortly):





It's quite cramped in there now. But the fan provides a nice bit of airflow internally, as there is a secondary set of blades to keep the motor cool.



And here's a short video of the outputs being tested (notice the boost element lamp coming on):



-----------------------------------

Thermal tape and mat arrived today!



Here's details:



While the aluminised sheeting adhesive is rated to 150oC, I'll be using it only on the floor, so it should remain intact.

I also made a little fan and put a mount for the thermocouple (it's on a 30mm standoff). I might tweak the fan, but it stirs the air gently which is what I was going for so it doesn't blow off components. It's also balanced . Don't worry, I will put a cage around it later on.



-----------------------------------

So as for the gap where the crumb tray went, I decided to fold the metal back over on itself:



Like so:



It looks messy, but it works:



You can barely see it when the front bezel is back on.

Now for the base thermal reflective sheet:



And the reflect-a-gold:



There was just not enough from the 15 foot roll to do the whole oven, but all the critical parts are done. You might want to order more as there is no room for wastage at all with the 15 foot roll.

And the door now has reflective sheeting on it:



In the background is Scho-Ka-Kola - https://www.amazon.com/Sarotti-Scho-.../dp/B00313TXTC Get some, it kept me up until 2am

Almost done, just need to clean up the wiring and then onto testing!!

-----------------------------------

Before the oven is put back together, I decided to install a push rod door opener/servo. The current servo mount is just a test, but the push rod setup works well. The rod is just coathanger wire. I will build an enclosure once I'm happy with it.



The tape is just to stop wearing out the front panel cover.



And here's the oven all together again.



All done! Now onto testing.

Last edited by bleckers; 9th April 2017 at 9:26 PM.
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Old 25th March 2017, 1:55 PM   #4
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Default Testing



The oven got too hot too quickly on the first go and the learning mode failed. This is a good thing!

The oven only took three attempts to reach an optimal profile.

So here's the profile after learning:



It looks pretty good, however the cooling phase is a little slow. So I might have to experiment with adding an external blower fan. The convection fan is stirring the air really well when warm, however the heat mostly stays within the chassis even though it's moving.

More experimentation is required.

Last edited by bleckers; 9th April 2017 at 7:30 PM.
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Old 30th March 2017, 10:15 AM   #5
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Default

Good stuff

Mine is in a gutted state at the moment and I'm working out where to mount everything etc.

I've made an aluminium panel that I will be fixing over the top of the old control panel - this will have a single illuminated mains power rocker switch on it, and possibly a fuse as well. I'll etch prime it and paint it satin black once its finished (waiting for the switch to turn up before I commit to cutting the hole in it).

I'm looking to mount the control unit on the top of the oven - roughly in the centre (left to right) , but to the front - not right at the front though as when the door is opened I don't want it cooked from the hot air escaping

I'll be using a multipin connector on the back of the control unit so that I can disconnect it to be able to remove the top cover if required.

I also have a servo with the kit that opens the door which I'm yet to work out where I'll put it.

Mounting the SSR's where you have mounted them makes the most sense in this oven - I'll probably do the same

I'm going to use the crumb tray and fix it permanently in the bottom of the oven - will add insulation between it and the floor of the oven (will also be insulating the top and sides but I need to source the insulation).

I'll do a build thread when I'm further down the track
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Old 30th March 2017, 2:48 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aXLe View Post
I'm looking to mount the control unit on the top of the oven - roughly in the centre (left to right) , but to the front - not right at the front though as when the door is opened I don't want it cooked from the hot air escaping
That's what I thought, hence why I stuck it near the bottom. It was too close to rising air for my liking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aXLe View Post
I also have a servo with the kit that opens the door which I'm yet to work out where I'll put it.
I was thinking of having a push rod setup with the servo mounted at the back on the unit. This is mostly because there is no easy way to have a door opening mechanism without it interfering with the way the door opens, since the handle of the door is in the center (you could make a small clip on bracket). I guess it could be mounted on the top middle, but heat might become an issue.
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Old 5th April 2017, 9:57 AM   #7
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I'll create a new thread at some point, but here is a pic of the front panel overlay I made - its 1.2mm aluminium with the cutout for the switch - bolts down to the original faceplate (which has a rectangular cutout to clear the switch) :



I'm mounting my 5V power supply on the reverse side of the front panel, below the switch - where you have.

I've also made up a bracket to mount the SSR's off the side wall of the oven rather than the rear now - you have your fan there, but I'm not using a fan at this stage.

With the gap for the crumb tray, I've decided I'll chuck the crumb tray out and make a small panel to fill that gap. I'm still to work out exactly where I'll put the controller, but it will be somewhere on the top of the oven - may have it right at the back now on a simple bracket - not sure yet.

I like the pushrod idea with the door servo - will be looking into how I can hide the servo away

I didn't actually even turned my oven on before I ripped it apart, and am not sure at all how hot the sidewall of the oven will get - I may have to put some ceramic insulation between my SSR bracket and the oven sidewall (SSR bracket is spaced about 25mm off the sidewall). I'm hoping the gold foil will reject most of the heat.

Last edited by aXLe; 5th April 2017 at 10:07 AM.
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Old 5th April 2017, 12:12 PM   #8
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Quote:
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That panel is awesome!
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Old 20th April 2017, 11:13 PM   #9
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The previous servo I had died (it was labeled "probably buggered" in the junk bin), so I replaced it with a Futaba S3003 Standard Servo.

For anyone that wants to see the whole oven in action, here is a quick video (running at 2x speed):



The servo kicks in around 2:10.

Last edited by bleckers; 20th April 2017 at 11:22 PM.
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Old 21st April 2017, 1:50 PM   #10
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Nice work Mine is just about done - wiring is 100% but just working out the servo mount and pushrod etc. Since I don't have a fan I have the servo inside and will be pushing the door open from the side next to power switch.

I'm also just waiting on some 6mm ceramic paper that I will be lining the top and sides with.
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