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Old 8th February 2004, 2:54 AM   #1
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Default Really new and lost for words

I am reading about overclocking and water cooling in computers.

Two things I have never heard of and I don't see any information about it on the site.

What is overclocking? Why do you do it? And how do you do it?
Is it something you do with the latest computers running at 2GH?
Or can you do it with any old computer?

Water cooling. Are the new computers over-heating because of their high speed? Or are those fancy video cards creating too much heat? CPU over-heating? or is it the RAM?
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Old 8th February 2004, 3:35 AM   #2
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What - Overclocking refers to the clock speed of your comp and basically it means that you can tell your processor to run faster than what the factory set it to run. This also causes the processor to run hotter than what is standard and generally calls for some kind of cooling system whether it be a better fan set up or the extreme system of water cooling.

Why - To get that extra little bit of grunt out of your CPU(more speed, must have more speed).

How - I havenít got the foggiest.
I have a P4 2.4 GHz on an Intel MB and I donít think the bios allows for Overclocking. But I have read that my processor is capable of 3 GHz without too many problems.
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Old 8th February 2004, 9:54 AM   #3
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basically wat credo said. u should be able to overclock any old cpu. overclocking is when u change the default speed of the processor to a higher speed hence overclocking. overclocking can shorten ur cpus life in some cases.

ppl overclock to make there cpus faster, for better performance. otherwise ppl jsut do it for the hack of it.

to overclock u must enter ur bios, which is when u start up the computer, down the bottom it will say press deleted to enter bios or somethin like that. once u find where the clock speeds of teh cpu is, slowly move it up.

if ur computer wont turn on because u have overclocked it to high, u will have to reset the bios. open ur case and look for a little battery, should be near the bottom of the case. there should be a set of 3 pins. with a jumper (a lil plastic thing used for connecting 2 pins together)on 2 pins. with 1 pin next to it bare. to reset the bios, u must change the jumper on to the next pin by moving it over so the jumper is on pins 2 and 3. leave it like taht for 10 secs then change it back to original place.

watercooling is a substitute for aircooling. for watercooling u will need a pump, waterblock, radiator/heatercore, tubing and possibly a resivoir(spelling). resiviors arent needed really tho.

watercooling works by running water over the cpu taking the heat away form the cpu. the radiator takes away the heat from the water and cools it again and the cycle continues.

watercooling can sometimes mean higher overclocks, but that depends on how good ur watercooling rig is.
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Old 8th February 2004, 11:38 AM   #4
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You can overclock on most computers, but newer ones are easier to overclock (you can do it all in software, rather than swapping jumpers).

Most people do it just to get a bit of a performance boost without paying for it. Other people pay a lot for it in order to get a system which is faster than anything that Intel or AMD will release in the next 6 months.

How you do it depends on the system. If you've got an AthlonXP 2500+, almost any Nforce2 mainboard, and some 400Mhz RAM, you just go into the BIOS and set it to run a 200Mhz FSB. That instantly turns the CPU into a 3200+. Then you just need to test it for stability, and if it's not stable then eithe rget better cooling or add more voltage.

Watercooling is just a better system of cooling the CPU. The problem with most CPU coolers is that they can't be very big - the sockets don't allow for big and heavy coolers, and as the fins get longer they also get much less effective.

With watercooling, you can move the heat away from the CPU and into a radiator, which can be very large. With the pipes running through it many times, the actual distance between the end of the fins and the heat source (the water pipe, in this case) is very short, so it's very efficient. You can also have bigger fans on the radiator, which helps because big fans move significantly more air than small ones.
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Old 8th February 2004, 12:35 PM   #5
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Thank you all for this fascinating story.

I don't think I'll try it as I am using my computer for work and problems can occur without going to look for them.

Seem to me that as ppl cannot race on the street anymore, they gave up fine tuning their V8 commodore and turned their attention to their computer's CPU.
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Old 8th February 2004, 1:17 PM   #6
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Overclocking PC's has been around for a long time, I think people were overclocking their 386 cpu's (my first o/clock was a 486 DX4/100).

It is just that now overclocking has become more mainstream, as has water cooling and case modding
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Old 8th February 2004, 2:02 PM   #7
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To elaborate on the "Increase the Speed of the CPU" part of overclocking, as the term suggests you are increasing a clock speed.

Modern computers are synchronous, they have a clock that provides the electronic count. This lets all the different parts to each other talk, by watching the clock and sending the data at a particular pulse of the clock.

The other type of computing would be asynchronous which can have its advantages in that things dont need to wait for a clock pulse to send their data, but there needs to be a method for the different devices to figure out what the data they are receiving is for and what to do with it.


So synchronous was a lot easier to use and hence our computers are synchronous. Unfortunately some parts of a computer become bottlenecks in the system because their processing of data causes other parts to have to wait for clock pulses.

The speed of the cpu relates to the speed it can run that clock at to synchronise its data transmission and processing. Overclocking is when you increase this clock, hence the amount of data that gets sent through can be increased.

This has its limits however as there are parts of the cpu that still need to process the data and if you run the clock too fast you can run the risk of loosing data or getting some corruption.

There are various ways to go about improving what you get out of a cpu, but usually its just about a bit of free performance. More often than not it wont get you a particularly noticable increase in performance.

The reason this happens? Well the people that make cpu's tend to give them a conservative clock speed that will mean they run at a good stable speed. Noone will buy a cpu that keeps crashing because its speed was set to high. However an enthusiast can squeeze that bit extra out of their cpu by pushing it near that line of stability.

So a lot of people here overclock not because of the performance gain but because of the challenge to get the very most out of their equipment, pushing it to (and sometimes over) its limits.
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Old 13th February 2004, 12:28 AM   #8
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someone mentioned increasing the voltage. How is that done? Will the CPU run faster if one increases the voltage?
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Old 13th February 2004, 12:45 AM   #9
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increasing the voltage by itself doesn't make things run faster, but it improves the stability of your overclocks.

For example, my cpu is meant to run at about 1733 Mhz, but I increased it to 2338. To help it stay stable at this speed, I also increased the voltage from 1.6 to 1.875. I did this also through the BIOS.

When people use the term overclocking, they might also be referring to getting more performance out of their RAM or the video card. Again, it's a similar story. You go into your BIOS and make the settings more aggressive. But be careful when you do this, cause there are risks whenever you try this sort of thing, especially if you don't have a good idea of what you are trying to do
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Old 13th February 2004, 12:46 AM   #10
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Increasing the voltage is done through the BIOS as well.

It doesn't necessarily make the cpu run faster, however it can help with stability at higher overclocks.

Ie, the CPU becomes unstable at a certain speed because it simply doesn't have enough power to go that fast. Increasing the voltage (slightly) can help get it stable.

Also produces more heat though.
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Old 13th February 2004, 6:41 AM   #11
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Don't forget when you increase the pulse your also increasing its error rate. When the rated speed of the processor is sold/display that's the maximum limit that that particular processor and architecture can run in a given period of time with minimum hassel.

So when you increase the speed you also increase everything with it (relative, but also remember companies sometimes use same architecture to save cost of manufacturing) and this includes the error rate, but since it has a faster pulse it compensates for it just as well.
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Old 13th February 2004, 10:28 AM   #12
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What the foundation for overclocking (well on the CPU anyway) is is the way the CPU is made. For example, all Barton-cored Athlons are made on the same production line in the same way. E.G a 2500 athlon (1.8ghz) is the same as a 3200 athlon (2.2ghz). Now the problem here is that as the silicon wafer is so thin, it is very hard to work with, hence there will always be imperfections. So the ones with imperfections that will run at slower speeds has a lower multiplier/default FSB ingrained into it so it defaults to slower speeds.

Chips such as these will run at the higher speed, but they have been proven to be unstable. Therefore, more voltage usually needs to be put through the cpu to "force" the instructions past these imperfections. More voltage=more heat, hence better cooling is required.

Hope this helped and wasnt all dribble

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Old 8th June 2004, 10:50 AM   #13
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actually, overclocking could be traced all the way back to the colossus machine back in the second world war, one of the creators tried to make the machine read tape faster by speeding up the tape. At default it was set to 5000cps, he sped it up to 9,600cps which ended with the tape breaking and flying around the room at 60mph (or so he says)

I remember people overclocking their z80's, amigas and 8088's .. so it's been around a lot longer than most poeple think.
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Old 8th June 2004, 9:36 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jazper
actually, overclocking could be traced all the way back to the colossus machine back in the second world war, one of the creators tried to make the machine read tape faster by speeding up the tape. At default it was set to 5000cps, he sped it up to 9,600cps which ended with the tape breaking and flying around the room at 60mph (or so he says)

I remember people overclocking their z80's, amigas and 8088's .. so it's been around a lot longer than most poeple think.
Hehe, this is completely off-topic (sorry), but that reminds me of the first "bug" in a computer system - it was an actual bug of some sort...ah yes, here's a link: http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/i...0/h96566kc.htm

Anyhoo, I suppose I'd better put something in that's on topic, otherwise someone will murder my family and kidnap my first born when it comes along. I've never personally overclocked, but that's because I'm typing this on my first real home computer, which was purchased at (gasp) Harvey Norman in around '99, before I knew anything about computers. I'm bound to try in a little while, though, with my new machine (less than a month away now ), and I would heartily recommend it, even just as a way to get closer to your friend the computer

Now I'm going to go and get a life...
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Old 9th June 2004, 12:00 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by Evil Dude
'm bound to try in a little while, though, with my new machine (less than a month away now ), and I would heartily recommend it, even just as a way to get closer to your friend the computer

Now I'm going to go and get a life...
Funnily enough I had the same opnion till I realised that stability is paramount to me. What good is a crazy fast computer if it crashes all the time or the cpu burns out after a month or two or whatever.

Windows is unstable enough for me. I like going to my computer, turning it on and having it work first time.

I used to overclock just about everything I could get my hands on, now I rarely overclock and only when the overclock is very very marginal.

But different strokes for different folks
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