Overclockers Australia Forums
OCAU News - Wiki - QuickLinks - Pix - Sponsors  

Go Back   Overclockers Australia Forums > Other Topics > Geek Food > Geek Recipes

Notices


Sign up for a free OCAU account and this ad will go away!
Search our forums with Google:
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 21st August 2005, 12:40 PM   #46
ezee
Fold On - RIP
 
ezee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Newport NSW
Posts: 1,412
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by [SuB]
So billtong is dried uncooked whereas Jerky is cooked as it's drying in the oven?

Always liked the billtong you can get at supermarket deli's.
As someone said, "Yep, biltong is dried, uncooked meat. Traditionally "wind" dried outside."

But so too is jerky or pemmacin.

Fan forced oven, no heat, full fan, just simulates the traditional environment in a low humidity convenient manner.

Both Biltong and Jerky and other air dried, salted, uncooked meat production methods have been used since prehistory to preserve a fresh kill for leaner times.
__________________
GrumpyOldMen, OCAU Addicted to Folding Club, Member #69

Remember the Battle of Brisbane!
I'm just a soul whose intentions are good.
O Lord! Please don't let me be misunderstood
ezee is offline   Reply With Quote

Join OCAU to remove this ad!
Old 22nd August 2005, 12:31 AM   #47
Dismember
Member
 
Dismember's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: w.t.y.d
Posts: 261
Default

Well, my batch is done. How are you suppose to eat this stuff? It's very very hard, difficult to even cut with knife.
I've never had Biltong before so I'm not sure mine tastes correct, has a distinct salty and sour yet slightly bitter taste. Takes awhile to chew and leaves a coriander after taste. My friend came over and questioned what I was doing with the meat, I felt it was done and he offered to try some first. After cutting a peice, he curiously eyed the dark dried meat before popping it into his mouth. As he began to chew his face began to grimace and distort in a manner of which demons would do. Soon enough I was eyeing the soggy remnants of the peice in my kitchen sink. As he gargled on Listerine he commented how it tasted of 'dirty old socks complete with toe jam.'
As so, my palate for the meat could have been slightly biased based on my friends reactions before I decided to try some myself.
__________________
♫♪
Dismember is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd August 2005, 10:19 AM   #48
Lem Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney
Posts: 67
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dismember
Well, my batch is done. How are you suppose to eat this stuff? It's very very hard, difficult to even cut with knife.
I've never had Biltong before so I'm not sure mine tastes correct, has a distinct salty and sour yet slightly bitter taste. Takes awhile to chew and leaves a coriander after taste.
Hi,

I use a VERY sharp pocket knife to eat mine, but back home we had a gadget that was used to cut the biltong into small pieces. Must try to get one sent over here. Butchers usually cut theirs into pieces as well.

You could try eating it earlier before it gets too hard as well? I now make thicker pieces and eat them while still moist inside - much softer then. The chilly-sticks from hell that I made earlier are now rock hard...ill porbably end up grating them and making sambo's.

Salty/sour/coriander is correct. Not sure about the bitter taste though? If it is too salty, just use less salt next time, or rinse it more before you hang it up. The vinegar probably caused the sour taste - you could also maybe rinse it more before hanging. No idea about the bitter taste though. If you dont like the coriander then you can also use chilly/bbq etc.


Where are you at? I could always mail you a piece to taste test

Cheers

Lem
Lem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd August 2005, 10:41 AM   #49
Kippa-Dee
Member
 
Kippa-Dee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Melbourne, Aus
Posts: 6,286
Default

Biltong is technically cooked. we got a Biltong Box at home... simply a box with a 100Watt lightbulb, biltong hangs above and cooks for 3 to 4 days... so it cooks at a VERY low heat for several days.


Gotta love this stuff... we gotta make some more soon
__________________
OCAU Guitar Players Club |OCAU Musicians Guild Member #14|
OCAU Fitness Club Member #22|OCAU Weight Training Club Member #24
http://www.lazarusmode.com
Kippa-Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd August 2005, 11:28 AM   #50
Lem Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney
Posts: 67
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kippa-Dee
Biltong is technically cooked. we got a Biltong Box at home... simply a box with a 100Watt lightbulb, biltong hangs above and cooks for 3 to 4 days... so it cooks at a VERY low heat for several days.


Gotta love this stuff... we gotta make some more soon

Hi,

You will find the bulb is there to generate a bit of heat to help dry out the air - makes the meat dry quicker. (Humidity = bad)

Big commercial biltong "rooms" use large fans that blow over heated pipes to help dry the meat out quickly.

You make the stuff yourself? Whats your recipe like?

Does anybody know where I can get a meat mincer and a sausage "stuffer" - wanna make some dried sausage.

Cheers

Lem
Lem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd August 2005, 11:44 AM   #51
Kippa-Dee
Member
 
Kippa-Dee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Melbourne, Aus
Posts: 6,286
Default

Ah man, usually just do whatever we're nt he mood for. We bought some biltong spice, huge bloody bag... but I mean, whatever we're int he mood for we'll chuck on it. Must try that outside recipe though...

I work at a deli too, so I'll be taking my biltong in and slicing it up on the meatslicer when it's ready

Totsiens, Lekker bly!
__________________
OCAU Guitar Players Club |OCAU Musicians Guild Member #14|
OCAU Fitness Club Member #22|OCAU Weight Training Club Member #24
http://www.lazarusmode.com
Kippa-Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th August 2005, 3:53 PM   #52
vdhdsgs
Member
 
vdhdsgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,406
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rukudo
Out of curiosity, what ingredients here help prevent diseased meat (botulism) etc?
Saltpetre. I'm not so sure it's available to the public. However you can get 'curing salt' which is 94% salt and 6% saltpetre. It's supposed to be better because the saltpetre it contains is supposed to be more refined.
vdhdsgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th August 2005, 9:02 PM   #53
[SuB]
Member
 
[SuB]'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 33
Default

Anyone got any pictures?
[SuB] is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th August 2005, 3:39 PM   #54
Lem Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney
Posts: 67
Default

I do, will try put them up.

Lem
Lem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2005, 11:35 AM   #55
n000b
Member
 
n000b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 2,489
Default

I'm making some at the moment and I am up to this stage:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lem
Place the thicker biltong strips at the bottom of an enamel container, cover with a layer of salt and then a layer of the spice mixture. Repeat the layers until the thin strips are on top, and add a final dressing of salt. Leave for 12 hours. Remove the thinner strips at the top and dip them quickly in hot water.
Once I have put them in to the container, do I cover the container or leave it uncovered? And do I put it in to the fridge for the 12 hours, or leave it on the bench?
n000b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th October 2005, 1:21 PM   #56
khoile
Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 429
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by [SuB]
Anyone got any pictures?
Here's mine on my sophisticated drying apparatus:


Click to view full-sized image!
Hosted by UGBox Image Store

I put too much salt this time though the texture is spot on.
khoile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th October 2005, 4:17 PM   #57
Lem Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney
Posts: 67
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by n000b
I'm making some at the moment and I am up to this stage:



Once I have put them in to the container, do I cover the container or leave it uncovered? And do I put it in to the fridge for the 12 hours, or leave it on the bench?
Hi,

I put mine in a covered container, not in the fridge though. its not completely sealed tho. Also I leave it like that for about 24 hours. I would suggest that on hotter days maybe putting in in the fridge...i dont think that would be a bad move.
Lem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th October 2005, 4:24 PM   #58
Lem Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney
Posts: 67
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by khoile
Here's mine on my sophisticated drying apparatus:
Looks good! I dont even use my biltong box anymore...just hang it up outside....I suppose ill have to use it otherwise ill have to turf it. Just check for flies during summer...not sure how eager they will be.

Dont stress the spices, you will get better at it. Minimal salt/pepper to keep the nasties away. Also I found that whole coriander seeds (a bit difficult to get) that have been (freshly) roasted and crushed give better flavour than the preground ones. (I tried preground last time when I couldnt find whole seeds).

Ground Chillies also work a treat - but can be VERY hot. If you cut some VERY thin strips and put lots of ground chilly on em they make delicious chilly sticks - if you like it hot.

Also Coles/woolies have been very scarce with decent meat lately...
Lem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th October 2005, 6:38 PM   #59
uniqueuser
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Sydney
Posts: 348
Default

Warning: Do not use apple vinegar. It stinks like a festering sore.

I have tried whole corriander, crushed, and ground. I must say ground is the best, both mess and taste wise. Also I prefer to use beef serloin when the price is right because it is thin and only takes around 5-7 days to dry to my satisfaction.

I don't use any measured recipe. What I do is cut off the fat, salt both sides and leave lying on paper towels for 30-60mins. Then dip each side of the meat in white vinegar (no stink). Let the excess run off (I use paper towels again). After that I sprinkle a decent amount of ground corriander on the meat and rub it in. At this time you can sprink other spices like pepper and chili (or before the corriander because it dries the surface of the meat quite a bit.

Though I'd share...
__________________
The world would be better without billionaires.
uniqueuser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th October 2005, 7:56 AM   #60
VR-X
Member
 
VR-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Sydney
Posts: 216
Default

thanks for your take on the venerable Biltong

I did some digging and came up with the following links, feel free to add them to the first post

http://www.steerage.co.za/biltong/

http://www.biltongbox.com/

http://www.markblumberg.com/biltong.html

http://www.biltongmakers.com/

http://www.3men.com/biltong.htm

http://www.scouting.org.za/visitors/biltong.html

http://mypage.bluewin.ch/a-z/Biltong/

http://www.markblumberg.com/biltong.html
VR-X is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Sign up for a free OCAU account and this ad will go away!

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time now is 9:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd. -
OCAU is not responsible for the content of individual messages posted by others.
Other content copyright Overclockers Australia.
OCAU is hosted by Internode!