Overclockers Australia Forums
OCAU News - Wiki - QuickLinks - Pix - Sponsors  

Go Back   Overclockers Australia Forums > Specific Hardware Topics > Electronics & Electrics

Notices


Sign up for a free OCAU account and this ad will go away!
Search our forums with Google:
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12th January 2007, 6:19 PM   #1
Philbee Thread Starter
Member
 
Philbee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Perth
Posts: 345
Default Hot swapping VGA (D-sub) cable

This is something that gets brought up every now and then in the office.
I work in live production and we are often inserting vga cable to laptops or pulling them when the machine is on.
I have been doing this for 10 years and just chatting with my workmate who has been in the industry for 20 years, we have both yet to see problems from our hot swapping.

There are those in our circle who believe this can damage the PC. I am seeking opinions from those in the PC world.
I know the cable carries volts and mA in the way of video signal and as we also convert VGA to RGBHV on bnc and connect those all the time without problem I think this might be an overestimate on the dangers of hot swapping.

I can recall one time at home where I missed my VGA port (try looking next time) and it gave a spark off the pci plate or something like that, pc and CRT monitor are doing well.

Generally its not practical for us to plug in, then bootup. What sometimes happens is the vision switcher becomes the monitor and the laptop screen wont initialize, unless you have a preview screen or know the toggle commands for the particular laptop this isnt ideal, especially when a presenter is on stage in 2 minutes and hands the laptop over giving you little opportunity to fiddle.

Im sure we've all heard a mic plugged in when the volume is up, the spike at volume is quite dangerous for speakers and amps. What is stopping this type of surge with the VGA/RGBHV cable?

Cheers!!!

EDIT: 95% of the time we work with laptops.
Philbee is offline   Reply With Quote

Join OCAU to remove this ad!
Old 12th January 2007, 6:49 PM   #2
-KoMoD0-
Member
 
-KoMoD0-'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Western Sydney
Posts: 8,591
Default

Ive never had any problems, and i have never heard of anyone having any problems either
-KoMoD0- is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th January 2007, 7:11 PM   #3
AMD2400
Member
 
AMD2400's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Sydney
Posts: 575
Default

i do that usually when formatting my friends computers, no electrical problems.
My first CRT did have a fixed vga cable and all that hotswaping has twisted and destroyed the cable. thats my only problem...

AMD2400.
__________________
Highly recommended traders = mitch79, jughead13, red marine, WCE07, von.Gunst, Jagdpanther, formage, occxlr8ed, PHAT_pudding, mad_OZ, zROYz
Procastination on OCAU | SYD Photographers LETS MEET
$$ Addicted to Shop & Swap #2400 $$
AMD2400 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th January 2007, 11:57 PM   #4
tin
Member
 
tin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Narrabri NSW
Posts: 5,828
Default

No device problems whatsoever. Anyone thinking it can damage things is a crackpot who shouldn't be let near anything technical.

There are some software issues though... But all are minor and resolvable without a reboot. The OS may not bother checking the monitors specs and some really retarded drivers (*cough* S3) may not detect the monitor automatically.

The absolute only way I can see things being an issue is if you connect the cable, the PC has a high refresh rate on that output (like 120Hz plus), and the connected monitor is an older one that spazzes out at that refresh. You may kill the monitor then, but it'd have to already be half dead or really old anyway.
__________________

The software required Win95 or better, so I installed Linux.
Question marks are the new full stop?
tin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th January 2007, 12:37 AM   #5
LethalCorpse
Member
 
LethalCorpse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
Posts: 3,742
Default

Only way that can cause a problem is if the graphics card is dislodged from its socket when you plug the monitor in. Even then, I've gotten away with this in the past.
__________________
Sig Of Shame removed.
LethalCorpse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2007, 2:29 PM   #6
Goth
Grumpy Member
 
Goth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: /dev/null
Posts: 9,231
Default

It's perfectly fine, except for a potentially increased risk of mechanical damage to the pins if you're unplugging and pluggind all the time, and the possibility that you'll be running with sub-optimal resolution and colour depth if the OS hasn't been configured perfectly for a particular monitor - sometimes. Anyway, you'll always get some display on the screen, even if it's 800*600, that's the worst that can happen.
__________________
"How is anyone supposed to know that this isn't just a bunch of crap?" - Richard Feynman.
Goth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th January 2007, 3:00 PM   #7
tin
Member
 
tin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Narrabri NSW
Posts: 5,828
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LethalCorpse
Only way that can cause a problem is if the graphics card is dislodged from its socket when you plug the monitor in. Even then, I've gotten away with this in the past.
Hehehe... Same. I've knocked out at least 2 video cards and one sound card with the power on before. All parts involved are still in working order (some are still in use).
__________________

The software required Win95 or better, so I installed Linux.
Question marks are the new full stop?
tin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Sign up for a free OCAU account and this ad will go away!

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time now is 12:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd. -
OCAU is not responsible for the content of individual messages posted by others.
Other content copyright Overclockers Australia.
OCAU is hosted by Internode!