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Old 26th September 2011, 8:49 AM   #121
renagade
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Cooked this again yesterday.
I roasted my own capsicums and have to say I think they were what made the marinade a whole lot better. I also halfed the cayenne pepper & chilli. I don't mind hot foods, but I also find that if the marinade is too hot there is no real taste.
I also bought 6 marylands ($3.30!!) and cooked them too 75degrees. IMO If it was cooking them for dinner, the Marylands haven't got enough meat, though they are tastier and juicer.
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Old 27th September 2011, 3:41 PM   #122
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i make this marinade and always use it on whole chooks in the oven... i put some under the skin, some inside of it and then baste the skin aswell....

i put it at 180 for 1.5 hours (turned at half way) and it turns out perfect i then pour the liquid from inside before cutting it up.

it doesnt get the char grill taste but is still amazing.
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Old 27th September 2011, 6:29 PM   #123
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cooked this tonight... was amazing. i actually was nervous about the flavours so i toned down the ingredients a bit but next time will use the full amounts of everything.

my only issue was that initially the chicken wasn't cooked enough in the middle... i need more practice with my weber - i tend to get it way too hot. need to learn to reduce the temp and maintain it at a bit of a lower temp.
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Old 27th September 2011, 6:43 PM   #124
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i guess everyones webber is different but i found that cooking for 7.5 mins of indirect heat and 7.5 mins over the coals PER SIDE gives me a good result.
Amphibius mentions to score the chicken too ..
its important as it helps the flavours penetrate more but also helps with even cooking of the meat.
super delicious recipe indeed!
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Old 27th September 2011, 8:53 PM   #125
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see i scored it, massaged marinade into the chicken, and cooked it for about 8 minutes on direct heat then about 45 minutes indirect and it was still undercooked inside but a little charred on the outside.

i only just got the weber and this is only my 2nd time using it. a little practice and i'm sure everything will be fine. i'll attribute most of the "undercooking" to the enormous size of my marylands. got them from a chicken shop close to home - they were butchered the same day as i got them and were simply HUGE - at least 3x bigger than any i've bought in the past. so it may have simply been that i cooked them as though they were a lot smaller than they actually were, if that makes sense.
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Old 27th September 2011, 10:28 PM   #126
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can i ask how many beads each side?
I normally put 25 each side (i use heat beads & haven't used charcoal b4)
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Old 4th October 2011, 11:29 AM   #127
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Made this on the weekend. Winrar!
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Old 5th October 2011, 2:43 PM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RETARD View Post
can i ask how many beads each side?
I normally put 25 each side (i use heat beads & haven't used charcoal b4)
I was under the impression you just fill the coal trays up.

Amfibius
I just bought a weber for the recipe, have you any other tips/recipe for the weber?

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Old 5th October 2011, 4:27 PM   #129
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Quote:
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I just bought a weber for the recipe
awesome compliment.

I'm still yet to make this recipe
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Old 5th October 2011, 4:41 PM   #130
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Congrats on your Weber

I think my only tips are common sense ones.

The most important thing is to make sure that each piece of chicken receives the same amount of heat. If you are cooking 4 pieces, you could probably fill up the charcoal in both containers. But if you are making more than that, then dump the charcoal directly on the fire grate and spread it around so that the heat is even. You may need more than 1 chimney full of charcoal in this case.

A stronger fire is more tricky to cook with than a weaker one, because you have a higher risk of overcooking your food, or worse - burning it. However, stronger fires also give you more flavour because you get those little burnt bits (don't know about you, but I love 'em!). If you don't have much experience, or if you are cooking a large quantity of chicken, then I recommend a weaker fire. Once your confidence builds, then make a stronger fire.

If you have space in your BBQ, I recommend a hot zone / cold zone approach. Build your fire so that one side of the Webber is hotter than the other. Cook your chicken on the hot spot, then move it to the cold zone to keep warm while waiting for the other pieces to cook.

Constantly monitor for flare-ups, because nothing turns your chicken into charcoal faster than a flare-up. A flare-up is a BBQ emergency - get your chicken away from the flare-up, NOW! Otherwise you will have no dinner! A few flames licking the chicken is OK, but you don't want it to be exposed to the flame for too long. What you want to see is your charcoal embers glowing red, not burning yellow flame.

The chicken will cook between 20-30 minutes depending on the size of the chicken and size of your fire. Your best tool is a digital instant read thermometer. Dial thermometers are too slow and too rough a tool.
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Old 5th October 2011, 4:48 PM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amfibius View Post
Congrats on your Weber

I think my only tips are common sense ones.

The most important thing is to make sure that each piece of chicken receives the same amount of heat. If you are cooking 4 pieces, you could probably fill up the charcoal in both containers. But if you are making more than that, then dump the charcoal directly on the fire grate and spread it around so that the heat is even. You may need more than 1 chimney full of charcoal in this case.

A stronger fire is more tricky to cook with than a weaker one, because you have a higher risk of overcooking your food, or worse - burning it. However, stronger fires also give you more flavour because you get those little burnt bits (don't know about you, but I love 'em!). If you don't have much experience, or if you are cooking a large quantity of chicken, then I recommend a weaker fire. Once your confidence builds, then make a stronger fire.

If you have space in your BBQ, I recommend a hot zone / cold zone approach. Build your fire so that one side of the Webber is hotter than the other. Cook your chicken on the hot spot, then move it to the cold zone to keep warm while waiting for the other pieces to cook.

Constantly monitor for flare-ups, because nothing turns your chicken into charcoal faster than a flare-up. A flare-up is a BBQ emergency - get your chicken away from the flare-up, NOW! Otherwise you will have no dinner! A few flames licking the chicken is OK, but you don't want it to be exposed to the flame for too long. What you want to see is your charcoal embers glowing red, not burning yellow flame.

The chicken will cook between 20-30 minutes depending on the size of the chicken and size of your fire. Your best tool is a digital instant read thermometer. Dial thermometers are too slow and too rough a tool.
Im cooking a steak on it now just to test it out.

Did you fill both coal containers? and do indirect?
Or did you spread it out and do direct?
Ill be cooking 4 pieces.
(sorry bit of a newb)
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Old 5th October 2011, 5:26 PM   #132
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There are ways to use the containers.

If the container is full of lit charcoal, it concentrates the heat.

If only the top of the container has lit charcoal and the rest unlit, you get less heat but a longer lasting fire.

For a steak, you want REALLY intense heat - so you want both containers full of lit charcoal, and cook the steak directly on top. If it is a thick cut of steak, then I recommend 2 stage cooking - intense heat to develop the crust, then when the crust is done to your satisfaction, move to indirect heat to finish the cooking. Always monitor the done-ness of your meat - the best way is with a thermometer, but if not - you can press on your steak to see how stiff it is. More stiff = more well done. For medium rare, it needs to have a bit of "bounce". It is harder to monitor the done-ness of chicken - one way is to see how loose the drumstick joint is, another way is to poke it and look for clear juices ... but both ways are very subjective and can be off by 10C or more.

For this recipe, you need less intense heat than required to sear a steak. If you expose the chicken to that kind of heat, you will burn the marinade. Cook it over direct heat but a smaller fire. Monitor the crust as you go - if you find the surface starting to burn but the inside still raw, then move it to the cold spot.

Don't worry it is easier than it sounds.
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Old 5th October 2011, 7:04 PM   #133
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I also picked up a weber :P Although mine was $2.25 off ebay!

Anyone used lump redwood charcoal instead of heatbeads? Is it the same deal - heat em until they glow, then start cooking?
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Old 5th October 2011, 7:58 PM   #134
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Yeah, same deal with charcoal. Heat beads are made of carbonized sawdust and starch as a binding agent. Because of this, they do not burn as hot or as cleanly as charcoal - and once burnt, they leave more residue. Charcoal is made from hardwood which is burnt under oxygen deprived conditions. Because of the variability of the hardwood, the quality of charcoal can be inconsistent.

Most of the time, charcoal is superior to heatbeads but you can get a bad batch which may be worse. Heatbeads are absolutely consistent from batch to batch.
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Old 5th October 2011, 8:02 PM   #135
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I saw 2kg maryland @ $5... some asian butcher! Soo i got 8kg of it

Anyways, i've made prob 6-7 batches of these, each batch about 12-15 maryland pieces!

My mum stores a huge coffee jar of pure blended chilli in the bridge so i add bout 6-7 spoons of it. MAN the heat makes it so much better!

Fuk nandos imo. All they do is have regular pre-baked chicken and squirt shitty flavouring on it??!!
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