Cooking kangaroo rare

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by daveaus, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. daveaus

    daveaus Member

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  2. bl4ck32

    bl4ck32 Member

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    yep, thats blue. Ive got mates who eat it like that, blood still swimming on the plate when cut.

    Ive have various cuts though that were actually more tender from cooking a little longer, so its personal preference...I dont bag anyone for how they like to eat
     
  3. Mau1wurf1977

    Mau1wurf1977 (Banned or Deleted)

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    I can't see how it would turn out medium rare if you cook it for such a long time (3 to 5 minutes on each side) as per article...
     
  4. Croc

    Croc Member

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    sounds about right, typical size porterhouse steak cooked for 5min on both sides is just under well done with very little pink only visable at most thick spot so going by the size of cuts on that page 5min would give mid rare
    also different heat, pan, number of stakes on the pan at once makes difference, just have to time it every time and aim for same size cuts so after few trys you can get it done just the way you like every time.

    EDIT: as for how far you should cook skippy, http://www.awpc.org.au/kangaroos/book_files/diseases.htm
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2011
  5. Big Trev

    Big Trev Member

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    I'm no expert, and have only had roo a few times, but I was under the impression that you could only have it rare. IIRC, because it's so low in fat, if it gets even close to medium, it's like eating shoe leather.

    As for "safety", unless you're eating roadkill, it should be OK... :)

    (edit) - eek, after reading Croc's link, maybe not... :sick:
     
  6. JohnnoD

    JohnnoD Member

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    As Trev said, it's fine. Rare is the best for kangaroo since it's so lean
     
  7. Goldminer

    Goldminer Member

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    rare kangeroo?

    Have anyone of you seen the bugs that swimming around when you cut them open?
     
  8. Draco

    Draco Member

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    Kangaroo is about the only red meat I eat now.
    One big tip that I give out to anybody who'll listen though: don't cook it like beef steak.
    Beef steak is cooked for a few mintues per side at a high temperature to render the fat. Kangaroo doesn't have any fat so you'll only make it tough. I have my cast iron pan at no more than one-third temperature and cook each side for about six to eight minutes. This often still leaves it at warm blue but, due to the slower cooking, it usually remains tender.

    It's an outstanding meat. Everyone should give the roasts a shot. Can't beat the price at ~$10.50/kg for meat with virtually no fat. Oh and as an added bonus, hippies hate it ;)
     
  9. rbdirty

    rbdirty Member

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    Sort of agree with this. It's my understanding that most of the roo meat sold is slaughtered by some red neck in the middle of nowhere and not in a more controlled environment where beef might be raised and the livestock given vaccinations.

    I find that pretty ignorant... people will cook and eat their meat they way they like it and not by the opinion of a celebrity chef. If I was served a piece of meat as pictured in the link I would tell the waiter to take it back to the chef to cook it more.

    I am a fan of the roo meat only because of the cost and low fat content. I find there's nothing worse than paying $40/kg for fillet steak when there's fat all the way through it.

    But thats just my opinion.
     
  10. Croc

    Croc Member

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    I agree 100%, lamb is perfect example for me, i love it almost burnt, it just so tasty to ME, if someone likes it rare or whatever that is fine as well.
    anyone claiming that something should be only cook one specific way is just clueless wanker
     
  11. scon

    scon Member

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    Fair enough. However the rare recommendation is for people who enjoy their meat moist (many people would say this is how it should be eaten). Because kangaroo lacks the inbuilt lubrication (fat) it gets very dry if you cook it all the through. If you like your meat to be similar to jerky, then cook it well done. I'm not a big fan of sauces with my meat, perhaps apart from a dab of mustard.
     
  12. OldnBold

    OldnBold Member

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    No .. there are very stringent regulations about the slaughter of any meat for human consumption .. so in this you are totally wrong.
     
  13. Alfonzo

    Alfonzo Member

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    Definitely recommended to keep them rare, yeah. The meat is so lean and dense it's a lot more difficult otherwise.
     
  14. HeXa

    HeXa Member

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    while I agree in general there is a problem with uncontrolled kangaroo meat quality, having articles with references such as "Womans' Day" does not further the cause :lol:

     
  15. RnR

    RnR Member

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    My choice of red meat. I marinade thin strips for a day with garlic, mint and olive oil and then I cook it till there are no more red bits showing. Haven't found it (overly) tough. Maybe because I cut the strips against the grain :confused:
     
  16. Yamunsa

    Yamunsa Member

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    um... yes and no. to quote from dfat:

    which basicly means a bunch of guys with a mix of 243, 270, 308, 30-06 caliber rifles, a flatbed landcruser with meat hooks and a slab of beer or bundy and coke on the back. the roos are shot and "cleaned" in the field, (gutted in other words). no refrigeration, no sanitary wipes or hair nets used there i'm affraid. almost all game is harvested like this the world over.

    however:

    dfat source

    i'm afraid "you are totally wrong" is an incorrect statement.
     
  17. bl4ck32

    bl4ck32 Member

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    Don't eat it then...more for me.
     
  18. Carbonfibre

    Carbonfibre (Banned or Deleted)

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    To be able to sell game (so feral pig/roo) you still need the food authority approval on the vehicle and on cleaning/hanging techniques. So the trays, hooks, crossmembers are all stainless steel with easy access to water and septic wash, its not as 'dirty' as you put it, the carcasses are hung before they are gutted, so no dirt or grass get into the meat. They are also randomly checked by members of the food authority to make sure they are compliant.

    The boxes also check the kills before accepting them.
     
  19. Grimace22

    Grimace22 Member

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    im not worried at all about the hunters, that should be the least of your worries, im more worried about the worms/tick and bacteria that you cant really see.

    I shall still continue to eat it though:)
     
  20. Yamunsa

    Yamunsa Member

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    sorry chum i was not going out of my way to discribe the process as 'dirty' just dispute the suggestion it was stringently a clean process.

    living in fnq, being a shooter, working in hospo and through preparing and consuming game i can catagoricly tell you that all meat shot in the wild gets dust, flies and every once in a while gets fouled internally when the intestine is severed during cleaning.

    here are a few examples of roo hunting vehicles pulled from the web:

    link 1 link 2 link 3

    heres a nice link to an article in life magazine about a professional shooter. the photo linked is him moving his quarry to be hung on an authorised vehicle before being cleaned.

    For human consumption meat, the heart, lungs and liver are left attached to the carcass for checking by a government vet in order to verify that the kangaroo was healthy. Head and forearms too are left on the carcass for human consumption meat but are removed if the roos are being sold for pet food.

    Meat shooters have to be registered with the Government Meat Authority and follow strict guidelines for meat-handling.The meat shooter must bring the kangaroos (with skins on) to the local chiller box around daybreak each morning. This can sometimes mean a trip of a couple of hours.

    Source

    moving back to the thread topic - i love roo meat. its affordable at the supermarket, in bountiful supply, is very lean and has the 'good will' factor as the animal has been able to live in its natural enviroment. personally i like my roo hung for a couple of days, broken down, cut in to thin steaks and flashed on a hot skillet with portabellos and mash. if you have the time, using the tails to make a good red wine jus tops it off beautifully.
     

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