How close is your NBN?

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Akh-Horus, Dec 21, 2016.

  1. r8response

    r8response Member

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    You'd be surprised how many people want to keep their extra sockets. Which isn't hard to do, except when their modem only has one FXO port :weirdo:
     
  2. hvalac

    hvalac Member

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    Thanks a lot for that info!
    I should be applying for fttn next friday as that is when it's supposedly going to be ready and knowing any extra info about gaining better a better sync is greatly appreciated.

    Cam.
     
  3. mareke

    mareke Member

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    Just have one cordless phone connected to the modem that has extra handsets and keep the handsets in different rooms of the house.
     
  4. caspian

    caspian Member

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    if they want multiple points wired back to their VoIP source then sure, but they're still going to need them rearranged off the incoming naked DSL circuit.

    I wouldn't bother myself, just get a cordless with multiple handsets.

    for that matter, I really don't understand why people cling to their landlines at all. unless you're in an area with poor mobile service, just use mobile.
     
  5. r8response

    r8response Member

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    See to you and me, that's the smart thing to do... Unfortunately, people are stupid and don't want to spend money to make things easier for themselves in the long run.
     
  6. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I think it's more that people just cling to what they know, rather than challenge themselves to understand change and make an informed decision.

    I spent literally months redpilling my mother off needing a "landline" when she got NBN FTTB. she has an ISP supplied modem, a single cordless phone, and a perfectly good mobile. her concern is communications in the event of a cyclone (lives in North Qld).

    if the local power goes out she hasn't got a UPS to run the modem, or the cordless. running a corded phone just draws power from the modem and would run a UPS down (although less that a cordless). then the FTTB node won't make it past 8 hours on batteries.

    in the meantime there's so much mobile signal from three different networks that I wonder the mobile isn't actually charging slightly just from EMF alone. the handset has half of the talk time and six times the standby time of the node, and I bought her a 10 amp USB battery pack that will see her well past the time all of the cell towers are down. and she can dial emergency 112 on any single one of them, her network or not.

    less than the cost of the optional voice service from the FTTB provider got her an upgrade to more talk time and data than she can possibly use on the mobile plan, and she gets that benefit year round, not the 2 days every couple of years there's a power outage from a storm.

    but people cling to their landlines. *sigh*
     
  7. Renza

    Renza Member

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    Not sure about FTTB, but my FTTN node made it past 16 hours on battery backup in SA's state wide blackout last year. Didn't go on long enough to see the node shut down after depleting its battery reserves.
     
  8. caspian

    caspian Member

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    this one is a micronode... 7.2Ah batteries, not 100Ah.
     
  9. Renza

    Renza Member

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    How long can one expect a full node to stay up with only a handful of customers connected?

    edit: looks like 4x 100Ah batteries in each node. Does that sound right? 4.8kWh is pretty decent capacity
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017
  10. caspian

    caspian Member

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    12 hours with fresh batteries?
     
  11. mareke

    mareke Member

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    What's the point of having battery backups in node cabinets? If there's a power outage in a suburb or wider area people wouldn't be able to use their desktop computers with the possible exception of people with a UPS. Laptops operating on batteries would work but to be able to connect to the internet modems need power. Presumably a VoIP phone plugged into a modem wouldn't work if the modem had no power. I have a phone that relies solely on power from the phone outlet so it can still work during a power blackout but such a phone wouldn't work in an area with FTTN where the old phone system was switched off.
     
  12. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I suspect it was some sort of holdover from FTTP where you can order a battery backup power supply for the NTD, which was originally intended to protect UNI-V services. that then got extended a couple of years later to powering all active ports including the ethernet ones, even though as you say the router required to make anything work off them would then need a local UPS. I have zero idea how many people would choose to do so, but I do not think many.

    personally I think the nodes only need a relatively small battery (like 1-2 hour runtime at most) just to act as a stabiliser through transient local power outages which are often only a few seconds. that stops the node needing to do a 20 minutes reboot and everyone is back online as soon as their modems resync (which they will do because the suburb just got powercycled). in the event of an extended mains power outage, landline comms would be down, and that's the nature of that beast.

    HFC works the latter way - the nodes are far too small to house any form of battery, at most they might have a capacitor or something as a power buffer (I have no idea). no power = no HFC network.

    in the published NBN documentation, sections 12.4 and 12.6 address this. http://www.nbnco.com.au/content/dam...product-catalogue-nebs-prod-desc_20170109.pdf
     
  13. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Do they not have to provide voice as a critical service - backed up. Like current POTS - you know for those people with medical alert systems, alarms etc.
     
  14. caspian

    caspian Member

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    if you invoke medical priority assistance for any fibre service then you get the battery backup power supply as standard. you can also opt in for it if you choose on any service, without invoking PA.

    but apart from that, no voice is not inherently defined as a critical service, any more than current POTS is.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2017
  15. bryn

    bryn Member

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    so what if you have a medical priority assistance service on HFC or FTTN- how does Telstra curently deliver that? I guess they could use a local battery backed-up unit with 4G in it.


    Also, didn't/doesn't the Optus cable network have battery backup as they have delivered voice over it for years (both voice over HFC & now VoIP)?
     
  16. caspian

    caspian Member

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    medical priority assistance is not an SLA on availability - it's a restoration SLA if it breaks.

    Telstra don't do voice over HFC on their own network. on their own FTTN-style cabinets they have the same arrangement, batteries.

    I don't know what Optus had/have in place, but some reading suggests their HFC network goes down with no mains power too. https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/641189
     
  17. tree86ers

    tree86ers Member

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    i thought the battery backup was for the ones that have a home phone, so that in the case of power loss the home phone would still work. since the old analog service worked with out home power.

    Having FTTP myself and not having the battery backup, i assumed this was because i did not have the home phone option as part of my plan as i have a mobile phone (and really don't need to be called about my PC being slow)
     
  18. caspian

    caspian Member

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    it started out like that (protecting UNI-V services only) but the feedback from the industry was that because many RSPs provide their voice services via VoIP, they wanted the ethernet ports protected too. makes no difference to me, as long as they don't mind the battery runtime being decreased a little.

    I have zero visibility of how many people actually went out and privately purchased their own UPS to keep their router going to make use of the capability, but I'm going to guess relatively few.

    when I did FTTP support for Telstra I think I ran across two people ever who had the backup battery fitted, and at the time 100% of services got the battery backup capable power supplies. you had to supply your own battery, but $25 seemed to rapidly sort out those who actually wanted it from those who did not. c'est la vie, wouldn't be the first time a bunch of time and money got spent on something that doesn't get used.
     
  19. Skramit

    Skramit Member

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    Is HFC quicker to get installed in the street than FTTN?

    We've had our site survey done for NBN Dec 16 but havent heard boo since then. Is it about 6 months from the site survey to get hooked up?
     
  20. SupremeMoFo

    SupremeMoFo Member

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    Check for the ETA on http://www.nbnco.com.au/
     

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