The 'Raspberry Pi' thread

Discussion in 'Other CPUs and chipsets' started by HyRax1, May 8, 2011.

  1. grrrr

    grrrr Member

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    Have you tried the latest openelec which is using kodi 17.?

    I wont try libre elec until i finish the current seasons of a few shows... I love having the lists tickboxed...
     
  2. toje

    toje Member

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    Yep tried the latest one, that's where I started to get CPU unsupported and all sorts of strange kernel errors, the installer bugged out pretty amazingly too.

    To install the new OpenELEC I had to reinstall 7.1 then upgrade to 8 again. It was a mess.

    If you get interested you can just dump the LibreELEC upgrade image in the Upgrade folder of OpenELEC as you would normally as its a fork.

    https://wiki.libreelec.tv/index.php...ibreELEC#Migration_from_OpenELEC_to_LibreELEC
     
  3. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    That problem hit a number of systems. There's a hard-coded string somewhere in the Raspberry Pi tools that identifies your model (ARM versus ARMHF) that only compares two strings at the end of your kernel revision.

    A recent newer kernel added a new string, and screwed it up. It's trivial to track down the BASH script and add the third string option (I've done it on a few systems now where I'm testing new kernels), but probably outside the realm of capability for your average "the Pi is just an appliance that I flash" crowd.
     
  4. toje

    toje Member

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    Owch that stings, :lol:
     
  5. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Heh sorry, wasn't supposed to be a dig. I've used Linux a looong time, but I get that it's all gibberish to people who are only picking it up recently.

    Part of the reason I love the Pi is because it's bringing Linux to the masses. But at the same time, I can see how frustrated developers get when fixes are simple, but people avoid entire versions/distributions of software literally because one line of text in a file needs a third variable added.
     
  6. toje

    toje Member

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    My move from Open to Libre was caused by a bit more than this one issue truth be told. I had been having minor issues for a while, and thought, "why not its just an upgrade package?"

    At home I run 3 Linux Servers, a Linux Desktop, a Linux Laptop with a kernel I compiled so I can get the ACPI stuff working correctly and FreeBSD on my router :p

    Trying different distros is the Linux way, and I don't like fixing things that should of easily been picked up in testing.
     
  7. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I fundamentally and philosophically disagree. Distro hopping teaches you nothing, other than to "format and reinstall" to solve issues. That is inherently the legacy Windows way of solving problems (which is to avoid the problem resolution of the mystical black box, and just blast it and start again with another copy of that black box, and no knowledge of why or how it broke).

    Open source is about tracking down issues for yourself. In this case, it's not a source code thing. You don't need to go and dig into C/C++ code, and you don't need to recompile things and update Git repos. It's adding one word to a text file, and everything works.

    I've spoken about this in my Linux/OpenSource guide in the "Other Operating Systems" subforum, as well as my "So, you want to learn Linux for your job?" thread. Both are very specific in their recommendations: don't distro hop if you want to learn. Find out why things don't work the way you want, and what you can do about it.

    Yes, choice is good. But distro-hopping is less about choice, and more about problem avoidance.

    Again, if you're treating your RPi as an appliance and not a learning resource, then do as you please. There's certainly no compulsion to roll up your sleeves and hack bash scripts if all you want is a literal "plug and play" device-style experience out of your RPi. And I'm completely aware that even experienced people often can't be bothered screwing around to that level for a device that was purchases precisely to avoid the "screw around time" that often comes with trying to make media devices for home use. That's all completely fair, and I get it. When it comes to my own personal media boxes, my tolerance for bullshit is pretty low, because I'm there to relax and watch media, not to do more of the same work I just spent 60+ hours doing at work that week.

    BUT - distro hopping is most certainly not "the Linux way". It's "the appliance way", which may appear a pedantic difference to the uninitiated, but it's an important one all the same.
     
  8. toje

    toje Member

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    Fair enough, I have tried lots of different distros to find what works for me, but primarily I've been on arch for about 3 years now :thumbup:

    When I started out with it back on Mandrake it was encouraged to try many different distros. But being disconnected from the wider social community I guess its moved on and I'm a relic :)
     
  9. grrrr

    grrrr Member

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    I don't know that I am experienced enough to have found the CPU issue if I encountered that problem (unless it is a google search away).

    However reflecting on my setup of kodi, and retropie, it would probably be surprising the amount of time I have spent in putty editing the config files to get things to work the way I like (or just work ;) ).

    I like to think Im a 'wanna-be' that wants to do things the 'linux way' when I have time to tinker.


    When I was setting up a pi music player for the house, there are heaps of options and there were a couple of apps/servers I intended to try, but once I spent the time to get the first solution working well, I didnt want to go through it all again just to 'try' something else.
     
  10. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    96 was when Linux first caught my attention, and distro-hopping has never been a recommended thing to my knowledge.

    Fundamentally there's a couple of major distros, and everything else clones them. You've got your "RPM distros" (RedHat, CentOS, Fedora, Scientific, etc - including Mandrake/Mandriva), and your "DEB distros" (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, etc), and then the edge cases like Gentoo, Arch, etc.

    These days, the differences are even more subtle. OpenElec vs LibreElec vs RetroPie vs Lakka - it's all just Debian with a bit of shit on top. I even struggle to call them "distros", as they're closer to a "spin" or "flavour" than a full blown distro. Much like Ubuntu/Xubuntu/Lubuntu/Kubuntu are all just a single meta-package away from each other, and can be converted on the fly from one to the other with a couple of trivial commands. All of these RPi "distros" vary by a single digit percent each, with most of that customisation being a configuration of a package (not even the package itself - they all use the same bit of RetroArch or Kodi, or maybe just a version bump wrapped up in a new repo).

    Speaking for myself, my media box is an RPi with vanilla Raspbian and Kodi installed on top. Was it insanely hard to make that autostart, choose a theme, and configure it? No. Could I have switched to a different "distro" and had it all set up for me automatically by some kid in a far away land who wrote a sexy install wizard? Sure. But to be honest, I didn't even bother checking, because "apt-get install somecrap" worked well for me, and got me to a functional setup quickly via editing a handful of files and away it went.

    Anyways, that's all getting a bit "get off my lawn" old man rant. Do as you please. Whatever gets you to a working thing is good, as is the fact that you've got a tonne of choice courtesy of millions of enthusiastic users. I find it all a bit of a waste of time to be very blunt with you, but it's a minor gripe. The more important picture is there's no a shitload more folks using Linux for fun thanks to a cheap little computer that was born of one man's desire to teach people computer science in a fun way. So for that, I'm grateful.
     
  11. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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    Found a use for a Gen1 model B that I had lying around:

    https://octopi.octoprint.org/

    Uploading meshes to your 3D printer over wifi (and having it slice remotely if desired) is most excellent and works reasonably well given the lack of CPU grunt on these units. Gen3 boards should be a lot quicker but hey this is what I had to hand and it works :thumbup:
     
  12. NuZo

    NuZo Member

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    I've never been able to get my RPI-1 Model-B Work well with wireless adapters.

    How does yours go?

    Cheers,
    Nuzo
     
  13. grrrr

    grrrr Member

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    I never had a gen 1 board. But I know for the PI2 I purchased a specific dongle that was known to work. There are plenty that dont.
     
  14. millsy_c

    millsy_c Member

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    Late to the party but I am still shocked at how tiny the Zero is! Feels like it's a MBP though when you've got all the adaptors plugged in to set it up :lol:
     
  15. 303-Acid

    303-Acid Member

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    Same! I grabbed the Zero and Zero-W just because they were cheap a couple of weeks ago. Yet to do anything with them. I was going to use the W for my Cumulus weather software but it looks like that'll work in my FreeNAS jail. Got a Pi2 for RetroPie, and two Pi's doing nothing but testing things.

    I was also going to try Amazon Alexa but read that it requires an Echo to fully function properly? As in, won't interact with devices?
     
  16. millsy_c

    millsy_c Member

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    No idea to be honest. I was going to use mine as well for a weather station :)
     
  17. pantner

    pantner Member

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    check out Japser

    https://jasperproject.github.io/

    might do what you want.
     
  18. 303-Acid

    303-Acid Member

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    Hmmm, dunno. Only thing I was hoping to control was my LIFX bulbs. Might give it Alexa a go anyway and see.
     
  19. grrrr

    grrrr Member

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    i thought openhab had lifx support.
     
  20. StratosFear

    StratosFear Member

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