TV aerial type & orientation for best reception?

Discussion in 'Modding' started by gregzeng, Apr 25, 2004.

  1. gregzeng

    gregzeng Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,094
    Location:
    ACT
    Using rabbit-ears, I move the ears for the WORST reception. Then 90 degreee twist for the best. Is this alway correct.

    Do the rod-strut aerials work better indoors? Does an outdoor aerial aerial, used indoors, work better than other types of indoor aerials?

    It was interesting to read in other posts here that each TV device might work better having its seperate aerial. Is this true?
     
  2. Symon

    Symon (Plugging your Socket)

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2002
    Messages:
    4,115
    Location:
    Santiago, Chile
    Do some googling on antenna design, it really is an area of study in itself. The rabbit ear technique you describe may work in some areas, but not always. It all depends on how your TV station is set up.

    By a "rod strut" antenna I assume you are talking about a Yagi (the ones with a long boom and elements along it at right angles to the boom). Generally speaking outdoor antennas will outperform any indoor antenna (going purely on design). You might not have enough room in your lounge room though to stick up a 22 element Yagi though...

    And yes TV's will work better if they have their own antenna. If you have a few TV's off the same line, and you are having troubles, you may need a booster.
     
  3. GeeBee

    GeeBee Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    8,239
    Location:
    43°36'22.9"N 55°55'22.2"W
    Depends on alot of things. Standard TV is transmitted in the VHF and UHF bands which makes it pretty much line of sight so a higher antenna mast may improve reception. TV signals are also subject to reflection which is when they are bounced off objects such as buildings which may either bounce the signal to you or prevent it reaching you. It is also subject to dead spots which result when the same signal takes 2 different paths to a location and arrives 180 degrees out of phase and cancels itself out at that point. Other factors play a role in the quality of signal you get as well. Quality of components plays a big role in the signal that actually reaches the reciever from the antenna however very expensive top end components dont generally provide much benefit for the money you will shell out for them though it is worth avoiding the bottom end cheapies. If you want to shell out the cash antenna companies have frequency spectrum analysers that they can do a survey of the reception at your place with and advise on the best setup.
     
  4. gregzeng

    gregzeng Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,094
    Location:
    ACT
    I notice that some indoor antennas have rotary knobs to "tune" the aerial, as well as being able change the direction of the aerial. Do these work? Also, sometimes signal amplifier are used, at the aerial, etc ... are these ok for simple internal aerials ? Perhaps they just amplify the ghosts, noise & distortions?
     
  5. GeeBee

    GeeBee Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    8,239
    Location:
    43°36'22.9"N 55°55'22.2"W
    Inline amps often called a booster box will reduce ghosting and distortion. If you want to try the indoor type of antenna try tandy as they will let you return the product if it doesnt do the job so you wont be out of pocket. Dick smith probably has a similar policy. Be sure to ask first as this may have changed since I did a similar thing.
     
  6. gregzeng

    gregzeng Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,094
    Location:
    ACT
    DSE & Tandy are owned by the same cvompany. Thank you for the very good suggestion.
     

Share This Page