10GB RJ45 between two computers via switch in home

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by im late, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. im late

    im late Member

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    I have a computer that has an onboard 10GB RJ45 Ethernet port (one side of the house).

    I have another computer that does not have a 10GB RJ45 Ethernet port (other side of the house).

    Both computers have an existing in wall RJ45 network point with CAT 6e cabling back to my garage comms cabinet which has my router sitting in it (functioning as the 1GB switch)

    So I am thinking I need:

    - A network switch (6 or 8 port is plenty) with two RJ45 10GB ports
    - A PCIe add-in card that has a 10GB RJ45 Ethernet port

    Am I on the right track?

    I do not need fancy managed switches, but I will assume if one wants 10GB, they will be managed?

    If so, what new/used hardware should I be looking out for?

    If not, is there a smarter way to get a 10GB link between these two computers?
     
  2. Matthew kane

    Matthew kane Member

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    10gb ethernet type NIC cards can be fairly expensive compared to a used SFP card provided you own a 10GB SFP cable and have a SFP capable switch.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    im late

    im late Member

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    Thanks for your post.

    Please show me something on eBay used that you would recommend...PCIe 10GB RJ45 card and switch with two 10GB RJ45....

    ...and I will decide if it is "fairly expensive". :) :thumbup:

    I don't think I need Intel premium as I am not trying to break any LAN records and it won't be 24/7 file copying.

    FYI, my on-board NIC chip is: Aquantia AQC-107 10G <-- I don't assume this is the king shit stuff, was just pointing out which one it is.
     
  4. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    If you only need 10GbE between these two machines, and everything else can be 1GbE, you can connect them directly on a separate IP range and save the expense of a switch.

    Means an extra cable, but it might save a few bucks until consumer 10GbE switching comes down in price.
     
  5. caspian

    caspian Member

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    you'd obviously need a compatible NIC in the second PC, plus 10GBASE-T compatible patch cabling (6A, not 6E), and hopefully the terminations on both end of the in-building runs are done to 6A standards. if you are happy to configure both NICs manually that will be enough to get you a link between the two PCs (with the two drops patched together at the cabinet), but if you want connectivity to the router for other traffic, DHCP etc then you need a 10GB switch too. the cheapest one of those I found in a quick google search was $377 for 8 ports and they were all managed, which is to be expected because 10GB is not consumer grade.

    I'd start by questioning what you need 10GB between two PCs for. it's serious money for what use case?
     
  6. OP
    OP
    im late

    im late Member

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    So I would need to run an extra Cat 6E "crossover" cable between the two machines?
     
  7. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Yup (see caspian's notes - re: "Cat6A")

    1GbE and 10GbE will "auto crossover" by spec, so you don't need a special cable. But yeah, the idea is one cable between your 10GbE NICs, and another cable per machine to your regular switch for connection to the rest of your network, internet, etc.

    From there, for example, you'd set an IP range for the 1GbE network (say, 192.168.1.0/24) separate to the 10GbE network (again say, 192.168.2.0/24). When you want 1GbE connectivity, use that IP range for transfers, drive mounting, etc. When you want to use the 10GbE network, use the matching IP range just for those interfaces instead.

    Pros and cons of course. Two cables per machine, two IP ranges, etc. And as caspian said - check that you can feed that much bandwidth consistently. No point running 10GbE unless you've got storage that can feed it (although honestly, 1GbE's 100-125 MB/s can now be flooded by consumer SSD, so I don't think that's a question any more).

    FWIW, I'm old, and we did this back when 100mbit was common place and 1GbE was new. The wheel of time turns, and here we are a generation of tech later.

    As above, the ~100MB/s of 1GbE is now "slow" in a world where mid range consumer flash media routinely reads and writes twice that speed, 4K video from cheap cameras is normal, games are hundreds of GB, and every phone and DSLR camera saves 5K low-compression/good-quality photos.

    Most small businesses in my industry are now putting in 10GbE as standard. Bigger places are starting the move to 40GbE.

    802.3bz (2.5GbE/5GbE) was a nice idea, but almost everyone is doing this on 10GbE capable devices anyway.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  8. OP
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    im late

    im late Member

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    OK noted on the 6A cable/standards thanks. :thumbup:

    Why do I need a use case? Why do I need to justify to myself?

    $377 it not serious money (to me) for a suitable switch. Link me please?

    And maybe a card like this: https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/X540-T2...720362?hash=item3d87a4a8ea:g:G-4AAOSw6idcozGW
     
  9. caspian

    caspian Member

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  10. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    if you can find a dirt cheap $50 used 1gbe 24 port switch with 2x 10gbe uplink ports (need to make sure they are RJ-45 not SFP!) , i think you can use the 10gbe uplinks for those two pcs.

    you can then get a dirt cheap $20 mellanox ConnectX-2 10gbe card, i think they are plug-play windows 10, but may perform better with specific drivers.

    edit: i cant find any cheap 2x10gbe uplinks that are RJ45 sorry. they are all SFP
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  11. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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  12. OP
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    im late

    im late Member

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    Thanks guys for your inputs, I will mull it over now. I have other crap to sort out first (see nbn thread).
     
  13. Aetherone

    Aetherone Member

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    I've been running one of these for a couple for years now. Decent little switches. Easily capable of 10Gbps full duplex throughput so no slouch.
    Australian gotcha: these guys are passively cooled and run warm (typically a 10-12*C delta) so they don't like hot weather. Once my room hits 35*C, it will start dropping packets and burping connections. A 5 volted 120mm fan makes no noise and keeps the delta to <3*C so the switch runs flawlessly until it hits 45*C.
    There's not a lot of use case for SLI 2080ti's but people still buy 'em. Compared to that, a basic 10g setup is entry level bikkies.
    I'm sitting in a LAN party right now and to help the dude who hasn't updated his Steam library since last LAN, we copy across the files SSD to SSD ... and wait around instead of playing games while they copy at a measly 1Gbps. USB Thumbdrives have gotten so damn fast now that sneakernet is looking like a option instead.
     
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  14. caspian

    caspian Member

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    that's not a justification though... let's waste money because other people are doing it too!

    you'd have to be running M.2 drives on both ends to exceed 1Gbps. but hey, spend what you like to save 30 seconds once.
     
  15. chip

    chip Member

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    even spinning disks doing sequential reads/writes have been able to saturate gigabit ethernet for quite a while now.
     
  16. Aetherone

    Aetherone Member

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    That's exactly the point - why settle for 70fps when you can have 100 (or 55 RTX ON!) for $2000?
    Why settle for a measly 1Gbps transfer when you can have 2 or 3 or more for the bargain basement price of $600?
    Frankly, given the eagerness for paying extra for unicorn vomit, I'm surprised that nobody has dropped an RGB 10G NIC yet. Perhaps the Asus ROG card with indicator LEDs on the PCB for easy checking through your window is the first step.

    Why M.2?
    The SATA3 interface is good for multiple times 1Gbps, ordinary old SSDs will easily flood it on both read and write. Hell, modern high density spinning rust can well exceed 1Gbps sequential write without much trouble for most of the disc.
    Decently fast M.2 of the NVMe flavour should bring 10Gbps to its knees. Brand new next gen gear is hitting 4,400MBps write. 40Gbps home network anyone? :D
    If only it were 30 seconds, maybe with 40Gbps gear and PCIe4 NVME at each end.
     

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