2 NICs in a pc

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by rockuman_ex, Apr 23, 2005.

  1. rockuman_ex

    rockuman_ex Member

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    I have a question.

    What's the use of having 2 network cards in a pc?
    What if I plug in both nic to my router, will it double the total speed?

    What can i do to maximize connection speed?

    Sorry, not really a networking guru, so please be kind :D :o


    Edit: can i like bridge them together to make one connection so double the speed ? :confused:

    Thank you
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2005
  2. pyr0x

    pyr0x Member

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    You can bridge them but you wont get double the speed. It's pretty simple to do, just select both connections and hit bridge.

    I'm not sure exactly what the speed increase would be, but not double.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    rockuman_ex

    rockuman_ex Member

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    But there will be an increase in speed right?
     
  4. andrewbt

    andrewbt Member

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    It wont double your speed if you connect them both to the same switch, unless both ends support bridging (not sure what the correct term is) I'd be suprised if this was supported on any SOHO switch, Im only aware of high end switches do this.


    As for having the two NICs together, I use it to have a crossover cable to my laptop and the other connected to the rest of my network, its not incrediby fast but it saves me having to use Wireless all the time and also not having a 2nd cable running to the switch. Windows XP bridging is useful,

    You can also do funky things like have an ad-hoc wireless network going and have one end connected to another network which in terns provides something like internet. Keep in mind that you dont have to have the same network ranges on the interfaces to bridge them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2005
  5. OP
    OP
    rockuman_ex

    rockuman_ex Member

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    Ok, i have bridged the 2 Local Area Connection (LAC 1 & 2), but it seems that only my LAC 1 have activities, not my LAC2. :confused:

    How can i make them both work together, sort of like share the load (if that make sense??)
     
  6. andrewbt

    andrewbt Member

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    Again, you cant unless your switch supports it. Which im sure, unless you forked out a pretty sum of money for it, it wont do.
     
  7. maddhatter

    maddhatter Member

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    That's not a bridge that's trunking.

    Bridging allows to to connect two networks together.

    Two interfaces allows to bridging, a WAN interface on the local machine (if you've only got an ADSL modem for instance), making a dedicated firewall, you could run services on different IP's, etc.

    As stated, unless the switch supports trunking, and unless the NIC's support it as well, it won't work.

    Intel Cards are the only ones I've seen that support trunking, mind you, I only deal with realtec and intel :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2005
  8. OP
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    rockuman_ex

    rockuman_ex Member

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    Ok, will this work:

    - I have a Netgear DG824M (an ADSL modem with built in switch)
    - A 8 port switch connected to the one of the Netgear's port

    If I connect LAC1 to the Netgear's port, and LAC2 to the switch, will it do any good?
     
  9. andrewbt

    andrewbt Member

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    Short answer...no

    apart from which, connecting your PC to the adsl modem and to the switch is only going to cause you lots of headaches

    I cant see why you would want more than 100Mbps anyways, but thats just me. I can see why for servers in large network deployments.

    But seriously, if you do want higher throughput, consider getting a Gigabit Switch and NICs
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2005
  10. OP
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    rockuman_ex

    rockuman_ex Member

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    or is it possible to assign the nic to a specific task?

    Like, NIC1 for internet browsing only, and NIC2 for file transfer between network or something like that
     
  11. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Yes.

    But it won't do ANYTHING for speed. You'll have two IPs to configure, then XP will choose ONE of them to send stuff on.

    What you're after is trunking or teaming (depending if you speak Cisco or Intel or 3COM or HP or ...) As has been mentioned before you need a high end switch to support trunking, and you'd know if you've got one.

    Bridging does nothing for speed either.
     
  12. infiltraitor

    infiltraitor Member

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    some programs let you choose the nic.. also. you can choose which nic to send internet traffic out of (networking wizard).
     
  13. OP
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    rockuman_ex

    rockuman_ex Member

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    How do i do that?
     
  14. aegan

    aegan Member

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    what you ar talking about, in regards to 2 NICs and linking them together to combine bandwidth sounds like "trunking"
    I know that sun devics can do this (Can we say Quad Fast Ethernet cards ?) - but you need special software on the device, as well as a hub/switch that supports it.

    I've never really been able to find anything on an m$ system that does this, but then i haven't looked real hard. dual 100Mbit nics, linked together and only referencing one ip would be sweet, especially if you could get both full duplex.

    i'm almost certain you'd require something done at switch level though
     
  15. detractor

    detractor Member

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    Give it up. It's a waste of time and you don't have the nescessary hardware for this.
     
  16. 4th

    4th Member

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    end of day isnt 1 nic is faster than your broadband?

    if you were leeching/dumping files locally it may help if windows recognises its there
     
  17. charliebrown_au

    charliebrown_au New Member

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    You can Load balance the 2 nics if one is a intel based card, using the intel load balancing software. That will create a virtual team card with the 2 combined to get 22 mb/sec using two 10/100 cards (11mb/sec)

    I think windows xp has load balnacing but i don think it works as good as the Intel pro set software that has team load balancing

    You could get a gigabit card that gets 22mb/sec to 60mb/sec


    No matter how many network cards you use it wont improve youre adsl or cable speed via the internet whichis locked speed

    Trunking is were Switchs's NOT network cards combine ports for faster uplinks

    If you want faster internet get ADSL 1.5 or ADSL 2

    Also limit the upload steam so youre download doesnt drop to bad speeds

    If you want to downoad more and you get shaped, get a higher download amount plan
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2005
  18. MustaineC

    MustaineC Member

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    My solution

    Well, I wanted to do what the thread starter wants for a long time. I realized I couldn't, I searched the net up and down, no way. Then I realized I had Firewire connections in both machines, and voilá! I connected them via Firewire! The solution was there all the time, I just overlooked it. I went to the store, bought a Firewire cable and that was it! No switch, no nothing, 400 mbits vs 100 mbits.

    Edit:

    The reason why I need speed is I capture and encode video in both machines and sometimes transfer about 30-50 Gbs a day between both machines. But if you don't transfer huge amounts of data in your local network, and you don't have Firewire connections already, maybe you'd like to consider the costs of Firewire cards for both machines. If you already have the connections the you only need the cable.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2005
  19. charliebrown_au

    charliebrown_au New Member

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    Its 400 mbps vs 100 mbps

    Another thing you could of done is bought 2 gigabit nics and use them with a cross over ...

    But since youre pcs have firewire it seems a good method for youre setup then
     
  20. Chronus

    Chronus Member

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    One reason to use two nic's

    Hi

    I am planning to use two nics in my computer soon, this is because i want to connect to a vpn (friends computer) so we can play games over a "lan" connection. when i connect to his computer via a vpn my internet drops out. and i can only do stuff via the vpn, i plan to tell Xp to use nic 2 for vpn and nic 1 for internet/local traffic.

    Chronus

    oh btw if this wont work plz tell me, ive already bought the extra card but i can spare the time fidling with it to get it to work. :p
     

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