3D CAD software

Discussion in 'Hobby Engineering' started by dirtyd, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    I am on the lookout for some 3D CAD software that won't pulverise my bank account. Most of my experience with 3D has been Solidworks, and it's great, but financially I can't really justify the license cost. I tried Onshape, didn't really like it and had some issues with web interface bugging out, random spinning load icon, and the app store seems a bit of a rort.

    I don't really need any FEA, rendering can be basic, I just need the basics of part design and assembling stuff together, mates, dimensioning etc.

    Does anyone here use Fusion 360, and if so can you share some insight into it's usability relative to Solidworks? Any other decent alternatives?
     
  2. aXis

    aXis Member

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    I've seen a few mates use Fusion 360 for it's CAD / CAM operations, they seem happy enough with it.

    I used SketchUp for a while and found it flaky for fine work, but OK for basic assembly.
     
  3. tumutbound

    tumutbound Member

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    Fusion 360 user but no Solidworks experience, I'd previously used Alibre.
    Hard to beat free but some of the more advanced features of 360 may only be available in the subscription version.
     
  4. Butcher9_9

    Butcher9_9 Member

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    I use Fusion 360 a fairly amount but I cant say its for anything over complicated. Interface is reasonable and (unless something has changed with the recent license update) it does also include a tonne of CAM as well which is nice (Do all of my CNC tool pathing with it) . Its a bit of a Rabbit hole, I must only use like 5% of it at most.

    Can't say I have used anything else so no comparison.

    Its free for personal / startups so might as well give it a try.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    Thanks for the responses, I will trial it for a bit.
     
  6. underskore

    underskore Member

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    Coming from ~10 years of Inventor, I have to say that Fusion360 is awesome, it does have it's limitations but most of those I've noticed are for issues that really only concern bigger/more-professional usage cases and not odd-jobbers.

    You can turn on the feature history and treat it like Inventor/Solidworks or you can leave it off and live in the 'direct' world. One thing that caught me out when I was still getting used to it was how some imported files wouldn't have the history turned on by default but once I realised that it was only a couple of clicks away I was happy once again.

    I have a hobby (free) licence for home and keep a 'real' licence at work; mainly for access to 3D-CAM in the realm of a decent modelling environment.
     
  7. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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    Fusion360
     
  8. OP
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    dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    :confused: The question is not what do you use. The question is have you used Solidworks and Fusion 360, and can you provide some comparison between the two?
     
  9. mtma

    mtma Member

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    If your work subscribes to Solidworks or Inventor, you may be eligible for a home use licence.

    For Inventor as far as Autodesk's licence is concerned it's a full version with the exception that it cannot be used within the work premises or on computers that would normally have the work licence and you're to uninstall it once you cease being an employee, but your employer could possibly impose intellectual property rights or other restrictions at a stretch.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    I asked a few other people and consensus was that it was suitable for my needs, ended up getting a one-year subscription on special for about $380, or about 1/10th of Solidworks license :leet:
     
  11. underskore

    underskore Member

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    I take it that means F360?
    Good luck with it, I'm pretty sure that after the initial few frustrating hours of googling after every 3-5 clicks you'll know your way around and will be getting on with it at the same speed as you would in solidworks.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    Yeah Fusion 360, and let's hope so!
     
  13. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Sketchup has limited decimal point resolution. I find anything < 0.01mm becomes troublesome.

    For fine work, I'll build it all at 10x or 100x scale, gaining the required resolution. Just need to remember to scale it back down before you export it/or after you import it in whatever next tool you use.
     

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