ADSL Speeds

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Madengineer, Dec 17, 2013.

  1. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    I am 800m from exchange as the bird flies but get 6mbit on DSL2+ because there is like 3-4km of wiring to get to my house, so dont forget that.
     
  2. LostBenji

    LostBenji Member

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    Up a tower somewhere....
    Unless you have a cable map (I am doubtful of this) and have actually walked the line, your figures are more than likely nearly double the probable lengths.
    1-.5 - 2KM of copper.


    ROFL
    Don't you mean बकवास बंद ?
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  3. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    How do you know that? I raised it with Internode and they investigated it and that was the answer.
     
  4. LostBenji

    LostBenji Member

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    Up a tower somewhere....
    Not getting into this, Internode are just a reseller (unless your on one of their very limited number of DSLAMs). The info you need comes from the owner of the copper (likely Telstra) and would need the cable maps to be accurate (I have proven these wrong on too many occasions) and/or would need a tech to put a loop into your socket or MDF to run a loop-length test.
     
  5. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    I think Internode own DSLAMS in my exchange, all my neighbours get similar speeds too.
     
  6. caspian

    caspian Member

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    it was vectoring, but in a lab environment with all sorts of noise generation equipment to simulate real world conditions. I would also prefer FTTP but the political reality is we're not getting it, and some fairly smart people have spent a lot of time and money on making vectoring work.
     
  7. malbert

    malbert Member

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    Did this noise generation include political rhetoric? :D

    I don't care if it's only 25Mbit as long as it's 25Mbit without Telstra ADSL congestion when the school kids come home each day.
     
  8. caspian

    caspian Member

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    not that I saw. the place is run by people who know what they are talking about, as opposed to ones who make promises pulled out of their arse that can't be fulfilled later.
     
  9. biatch

    biatch Member

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    For what it's worth, Dodo manually configure the ports at 1.5mbit, even if you're on an adsl2+ plan. How else do you think they make a profit on their shitty congested network?

    I just moved into a place where the previous chick had dodo unlimited adsl2. When I plugged my modem in (after signing up with iiNet), I could only sync in ANSI at 1.5mbit. My ISP had to get the port reconfigured and even that took 24 hours before I could sync in G992.5

    So I don't disagree with all that's been said above, but keep in mind that their unlimited plan/s are not likely to be full speed. But that's why it's cheap - they make the money back elsewhere.
     
  10. caspian

    caspian Member

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    exactly. as always, TANSTAAFL.
     
  11. koopz

    koopz Member

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    http://www.tpg.com.au/maps/

    look yourself up.

    Telstra techies carry a similar tool on their toughbooks - though it's not for public consumption. I think it should be



    and they say Canberra was designed from the ground up ;)

    if it helps to know, NBN techies sees similar bullshit. We just get new paths dug though :p
     
  12. evilasdeath

    evilasdeath Member

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    Hehe love it look at my address, massive variations in speed for locations very close to the exchange.

    Code:
    Distance	Protocol	Sync Down	SNR Down	Atten Down	Sync Up	SNR Up	Atten Up
    <100m		ADSL2+		20706		6.1		23.0		1020	8.5	13.1
    <100m		ADSL2+		16970		6.0		17.0		1020	9.0	12.8
    <200m		ADSL2+		10318		6.6		25.0		837	8.0	14.5
    <200m		ADSL2+		12066		6.1		37.0		1020	10.0	18.8
    <200m		ADSL2+		22804		6.5		16.0		1020	8.5	7.6
    <200m		ADSL2+		8106		6.3		37.0		840	6.0	27.0
    <200m		ADSL2+		19714		6.0		19.0		1020	8.0	7.6
    Line of sight distance: 600m. Possible cable distance: 853m. 
    To the op at your address with ADSL2+ you will get exactly up to 24mbit

    Telstra techies can see the exact physical distance on there toughbooks, they link up to a wireless router in the can connected to 3g/4g it would be some GIS system not sure which thou.

    Being able to publically look up cable distances would be a danger, people could work out where address go, business especially and cut them. Although i'm not sure what would be worse, crooks cutting 1 cable that they know or them just cutting up the whole lot. Have had fibre cables cut and our techs have shown up and sitting next to the telstra guys fixing their cable after some prick went through them with a hatchet or similar.
     
  13. koopz

    koopz Member

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    nah - they just see a more detailed map of the street - it's still just an (best case) estimation with figures thrown in previously by engineers . Techs still need to physically attach testing equipment to determine exact measurements during the fault finding process.

    (edit) the 3G component of the Telstra Toughbook is there to ensure the tech is *cough* online at all *cough* times so they can use Telstra's CRM system for job management purposes. It wouldn't surprise me if Telstra GPS tracked their techs - many companies with vehicles on the road need to do this ((/edit))

    When I used to be an IT field techy I would sit clients through a few speedtests, then cross-reference that with the TPG DSLAM coverage map to help point out inconsistencies between the client's connection and that of the area. We'd follow up with Telstra to have the lines examined if replacing their existing networking equipment did not yield positive results.

    I wish I had a Fluke meter and an AusTel licence back then :/
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2013
  14. caspian

    caspian Member

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    why? (note: "would like to be" != "should".)

    speaking as someone who used to have access to all the tools that the techs did, plus a few more besides -

    the GDD cable maps are OK, as long as they reflect what's actually in the ground accurately. personally I far preferred the CPR2 extract you could get on a full SQ request, as it was the same data in records form (as opposed to graphical), so it could be manipulated in code.

    one of my ex-colleagues wrote the code that Telstra still uses to generate DSL SQ results to this day, and I used to help debug it when new features had to be built in.

    it would also be a brave individual that stuck a TDR on the end of a cable section and pronounced that it was x long for sure. electrical faults can and will distort the readings.

    in practice - CPR2 data is used to describe the construction of a line, and how it should perform. GDD map data is then used to find where the components of a line are, and a TDR is used to measure how it performs. these test results are then compared to the CPR2 data to determine if there is a fault, and where.

    the 3G component is to allow the techs to log in and post results of job cleared, and be assigned new ones, plus access tools, diagnostics and information they need along the way. they don't do CRM.

    to my knowledge all Telstra field vehicles have long had a built in 3G device which also functions as a wifi hotspot so the techs can use their laptops conveniently, although they still have 3G modems for when they are out of range (indoors, underground etc). all exchange buildings also have wifi, I did part of the config on the WAPs they used for the test rollout.

    GPS tracking of vehicles has been done for many years, from memory Telstra started it in something like 2006. I was part of a trial team that used the system to direct field staff to jobs, the idea was that no two techs should ever pass each other on the way to a job unless skill sets required it. it did lead to some legendary screwups until they tuned the bugs out of it.

    I used to have god access to the database that tracked all the data, plus every job the tech had ever done, the test results obtained and uploaded, fault history of a services, clear codes, movement of the staff etc. absolutely brilliant tool.

    that would be a nice idea except for the inconveniences that:

    (a) heatmaps are just another way of displaying statistics, and individual samples aren't affected by averages. to put it another way - if a given phone line only supports 2Mbps sync and the neighbours on both sides get 12Mbps, then that's just bad luck.
    (b) Telstra have a set of assurance standards which work on minimums only, with no allowance or consideration made for "should" or "would like". I'm very familiar with these standards, I helped write them.
     
  15. koopz

    koopz Member

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    Firstly, in keeping with the info I provided the OP:

    CONSUMER: Broadband customers should be able to view how their address is serviced by their existing provider in other ways. ie: Were an ISP (ie as Telstra) to have such a tool, customers operating in an area indicated as a low speed 'blue zone' could have the possibility of seeing whether nearby cable/NBN/3G were better options for their purchasing dollar. Indeed a handy tool if you were considering moving house/business to a new area. Having the tool as a user-friendly app for Android/IOS would go a long way.

    INDUSTRY: if FTTN sees light of day much will change at work. I really can't comment.

    techincally this is true - many IT/CT Telstra contractors who have being using newer tablet-based systems that I have seen have now been forced back to the old laptop tech.. though it seems Telstra is putting newer laptops to replace their aged Toughbook SOE spec. I'm hoping they have a handy Android tab on the way... I couldn't imagine using a laptop or a PDA system anymore

    I was hoping to see a modern replacement for Toolkit on a tablet - I used to find it a pig to use compared to other systems... though I came across an Optus CT using an ancient PDA the other day. It's odd that some of them are using PDAs while others are on tablets :/

    I wish our heatmap was out there for public consumption.

    out of respect for Telstra employees everywhere who were and continue to be screwed over I not going to go into one of my usual (IT based) tirades about Telstra's crappy copper network and their inability to acknowledge it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2013
  16. caspian

    caspian Member

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    why? it's frankly none of their business.

    what do you mean "if"?

    it's true, period.

    I was hoping to see a modern replacement for Toolkit on a tablet - I used to find it a pig to use compared to other systems... though I came across an Optus CT using an ancient PDA the other day. It's odd that some of them are using PDAs while others are on tablets :/

    Telstra's copper network is generally OK for the uses it's intended for. penny pinching management over the last decade has not helped, but then again the asset is not supposed to still be in such wide service either!

    for every comment about "crappy copper" I think back to when I was a level 2 and 3 specialist who assisted ESD managers, and a RFC who did pattern management. my fault queues normally ran around the 0.1% level for all services in operation, which suggests that the CAN is actually pretty good to me.

    it's apparently trendy and cool to bash Telstra's CAN, but the reality is that for every service with a problem there are 999 more without one, and that's a passing grade in most fields of human endeavour, especially where the user is paying a few bucks a month for the service. it's not brain surgery, where a somewhat higher success rate is expected, and you can't fix mistakes with another truck roll.

    and that's from an ex-Telstra employee who has absolutely zero reason to owe the company anything, but is happy to defend them on the basis of fact and a general dislike of me-too bullshit artistry.
     
  17. koopz

    koopz Member

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    I believe you need to take this conversation less personally, and concentrate your thoughts on how it is you wish to benefit the OP of this thread. If you wish to take it further - please do so in another existing thread or create a new one caspian
     
  18. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I don't take anything personally on the internet, but I'll happily shoot down in flames rubbish when I see it.

    don't want it shot down - either get it right, or don't post it.

    as far as I'm concerned antibullshit activism is very much to the benefit of everyone, the OP included.
     
  19. koopz

    koopz Member

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    I cannot work with you


    your cup is full dude...
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2013

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