Advice - should this work?

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by AzonIc, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. AzonIc

    AzonIc Member

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    I'm not great with electronics so seeking some help - can anyone say if the following should work? I am wanting to wire a garage door buzzer to an unused button in my car.

    In the image below, the top circuit is from my car - the middle button is used but the above and below ones aren't. The lower circuit is the garage buzzer. My item was to wire it up to the circuit. Soldering that small would be an issue for me so might need some conductive glue?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Privatteer

    Privatteer Member

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    If you can pull it off without damaging anything it would work. Must cut the tracks as indicated otherwise mixing 2 different voltages.
    You would probably be better off getting a small relay and picking up the contact from the back of the switch.
    Press button to energise relay, bringing in a volt free contact wired onto the garage remote.
     
  3. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    If there's actual volts on the car button contacts then you'll need to cut tracks or isolate with a relay etc, if the pads aren't actually powered then you probably shouldn't need to.

    Looking at the piccy though - depending what the actual soldered points are supposed to be doing there, then rather than cutting tracks in the car switch button you might even get away with simply unsoldering the appropriate solder joint for the button you want to use - the far right-hand one looks to be for the upper contacts, third from the left for the lower one. But you'll need to check for actual volts or ground points in that switch setup to be sure, to see if your middle switch is switching a ground point or actual car voltages.

    Few extras to ponder:

    - how are you going to handle ongoing power to the garage door thingy. You thinking of simply keep changing the battery in the garage thingy fob or look at going fully integrated, and fiddle the nominal +12 volt car power to whatever volts the thingy needs (also knowing you might need to track down a permanent +12 volt wire in the dashboard, or fiddle switched power with a suitable rechargeable battery setup on the thingy);

    - and where are you going to install the garage thingy in the car? If you bury it in the dashboard or centre console you'll run a risk of screwing up the operating range. If you need to sit it on the dashboard or wave it around for the door to work then you simply might be better off leaving it as a stand-alone device hidden away somewhere on a piece of velcro...

    - the two buttons on the garage door thingy. Presumably one is for open and the other to close, or one for the door and the other for a light? Either way you've got two spare buttons in the car switch thingy, right?... :)

    - obviously if you sell the car then don't forget to rip the door thingy out of it. And if the car gets stolen then straight away you might have to change the garage door hardware/operating codes/freqs, in case "they" come visiting (there's anther recent Thread somewhere in Motoring on stolen vehicles that I think touches on this subject...).
     
  4. OP
    OP
    AzonIc

    AzonIc Member

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    Thanks for the replies!

    As for power to the fob, I'll keep it simple and just use the on board battery. It lasts for years and getting access to swap it out if it's inside the dash isn't too hard, one screw is all that's involved.

    I'll install it inside the dash, behind the buttons it'll be connected to. Currently it works from a few houses away so I don't anticipate any issues in my driveway but perhaps I should try to test this first.

    The 2 buttons on the fob are simply for two different signals - for people that might have a motorised gate and a roller door for example. I don't really need the second one but I could hook it up to the other spare button if needed.

    The fob is about the size of a 20 cent peice, so the tabs are quite small. I can handle the soldering onto the car button fine, but the fob is beyond my basic skills, especially with other components so close. I decided to see if an electronics repair store can solder those wires on for me, it should be a quick job and so not too expensive. Once I've got that I can do the rest.

    If the car is stolen the non descript OEM button will actually be less obvious than the fob hanging about inside the car so a bit safer (I also try to avoid keeping anything in the car with my address on it), but yes I would need to wipe the garage door if the car was stolen. If I sell the car I might use it as a selling point :lol:

    One good thing is I did dig out my multimeter I bought over a decade ago to test this but I never knew how to use it, so I watched a youtube video and now understand.. and the battery in it was still good!
     

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