AIO vs High end air 2020

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by Jazper, Jun 8, 2020.

  1. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,996
    Location:
    Sydney
    so what if you added power to circulate the heatpipe liquid? wouldnt it just be a better heatpipe? and as you improve it further, increasing flow etc, adding optimal head patterns, isnt that just becoming what a water cooler is?

    i guess the key issue is the room temperature of the liquids. you can only do so much. and why phase change and liquid gasses work so well.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2020
  2. kogi

    kogi Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4,877
    Location:
    2031
    I am also thinking of going aio. Would prob be spending ~$150 for case fans. But might as well spend a bit more for something that will cool the cpu and exhaust as well
     
  3. argent

    argent Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2003
    Messages:
    2,595
    Location:
    adl.sa.au:5063
    Just remember that with going AIO, the radiator placement matters a LOT to your thermal performance. Typically in a standard mATX+ case, top mounted radiators as exhaust will lead to noticeably higher numbers overall especially when coupled with an open design GPU.
     
  4. kogi

    kogi Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4,877
    Location:
    2031
    *confused*

    So front mounted intake is better than top mounted exhaust?
     
  5. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    18,946
    Location:
    Sunnybank Q 4109
    ive seen a few tests of this, the answer seems to be yes.
     
  6. argent

    argent Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2003
    Messages:
    2,595
    Location:
    adl.sa.au:5063
    Correct as a generalisation - obviously individual setup dependent but typically correct. There are a number of YT vids on the subject you can find.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Jazper

    Jazper Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2001
    Messages:
    2,668
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    The whole principle of heatpipes is phase change. Heatpipes are incredibly efficient at channeling heat, more so than pumped water even.

    Check out this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_pipe
     
  8. spit051261

    spit051261 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2019
    Messages:
    2,834
    Location:
    Perth
    The best cases I have seen for CPU AIO placement seem to be Lian Li.
    An AIO mounted at the front side pulling cold air in works very well.
     
  9. cbwolf

    cbwolf Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Messages:
    2,772
    Location:
    Melbourne
    • 360/280 AIOs outperform top-end aircoolers (i.e. NHD15) by a few degrees.
    • 360mm and 280mm AIOs perform virtually identically to each other.
    • I prefer 280 over 360 AIOs because they tend to be quieter for the same cooling level and with a better sound signature due to larger fans.

    Watch this video - it gives you a comprehensive, data-driven answer to all your questions with no hyperbole:

     
    sskmercer, raincloudx and argent like this.
  10. raincloudx

    raincloudx Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    1,755
    Location:
    Victoria
    New gen D15 with a real A14 fan will be good then :leet:
     
  11. 192.168.0.1

    192.168.0.1 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,529
    Location:
    Postcode: 2528
    tl;dw as I've seen it before :) but it's usually fairly equal there is usually no clear winner. Essentially it's just a trade of between a snapped motherboard or a wet motherboard :)
     
  12. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    18,946
    Location:
    Sunnybank Q 4109
  13. raincloudx

    raincloudx Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    1,755
    Location:
    Victoria
    Nice, heatsink doesn't seem to be a huge upgrade over the D15 - but hopefully once the real A14x25 comes out that will be enough to knock off another few degrees.
     
  14. cbwolf

    cbwolf Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Messages:
    2,772
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Yep - for like $90 a fan :shock::shock::shock:
     
  15. raincloudx

    raincloudx Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    1,755
    Location:
    Victoria
    Haha $90 will buy the brown version :upset::upset::upset:
     
  16. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    18,946
    Location:
    Sunnybank Q 4109
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2020
  17. cbwolf

    cbwolf Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Messages:
    2,772
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I'm pretty sure i remember Zalman releasing one of those in the early 2000s. Realistically they're too big, and a smaller cooler with a low speed fan is functionally the same in a smaller package (i.e. inaudible)
     
  18. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2002
    Messages:
    156,149
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    Having a look at that video again it appears as though there's no real reason to update from my existing X62 which is a bit disappointing. I don't really need any flashy gifs on my cooler. Otherwise will very little cooling difference there's no real changes worth upgrading to.
     
  19. HobartTas

    HobartTas Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2006
    Messages:
    1,001
    Water stores a lot of heat but is not that thermally conductive whereas heat pipes can absorb a tremendous lot of heat during the phase change going from liquid to gas but the limitation in CPU coolers is the amount and speed of the gas going to the other end of the pipe and condensing there.
     
  20. OP
    OP
    Jazper

    Jazper Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2001
    Messages:
    2,668
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    This is somewhat true. A well designed heatpipe can have enormous thermal conductivity, many times the conductivity of copper, thus it typically is not the limit for air cooling. Air flow (amount), fin conductivity, number of heat pipes, fin size, as well as density of the material(which affects time to heat soak) are the limitations.

    You can have more or greater sized radiators in watercooling and thus more surface area to dissipate heat, as well as more volume (of transfer material, eg water) which slows time to equilibrium.

    With air cooling, you want to heat soak the metal as much as possible as fast as possible as it expands under heat and you have more surface area. With water cooling the density of the coolant slows this, which makes it better for peaky loads.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2020

Share This Page

Advertisement: