AIO vs High end air 2020

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by Jazper, Jun 8, 2020.

  1. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    then why isnt there an active heat pipe system invented yet? would it be equivalent a phase change system that people had back in the day?

    or what about some water cooled heat pipe hybrid?
     
  2. OP
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    Jazper

    Jazper Member

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    Active heat pipes aren't really necessary - as mentioned their thermal conductivity is extremely high. You can get different sized heatpipes, some are really long.

    Heat pipes however are only about getting heat from one place to another place quickly, the only way they can dissipate large amounts of heat are fins or some secondary cooling mechanism, though they do act as fins themselves.. You could (in theory) use heat pipes to draw heat away from a hot component, then use water cooling to move the heat to a radiator, but there isn't a lot of point cause you still have to get the heat off the pipe somehow.
     
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    Jazper

    Jazper Member

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    I think if you're going watercooling with an AIO you want to go with a corsair or nxzt as they both have long warranties, as opposed to another brand (eg arctic or thermaltake) who only have a 2 year warranty.
     
  4. spit051261

    spit051261 Member

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    Chiller is the way to go.
    AIO just circulates ambient air over the rad .
    If you don't want a chiller , put rad in ice water and watch your temps drop.
     
  5. Butcher9_9

    Butcher9_9 Member

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    Add on top of this that the more thermal interfaces you have the worse the overall cooling is. If you are going to use water cooling then you might as well just water cool the component directly.

    Also just because heatpipes have a massive capacity does not means that is a massive capacity with a low delta.

    Pretty sure thats just called water cooling :p
     
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  6. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    Fine in winter though, and at least as effective as air....and having the bonus of being quite silent.
     
  7. PhilDee

    PhilDee Member

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    Moved from a D15 to an NZXT X73 a couple weeks ago. I put the nzxt in the old system (9900K) for a week while waiting on other parts. Temps dropped between 5 and 8c running prime with fans set to give a similar volume to the D15, pretty much what I was expecting. I favor quiet on the fan curves and I’m happy with the volume coming from the nzxt at least how I have it set.
     
  8. zoki_007

    zoki_007 Member

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    I ended up getting Corsair H115i RGB PRO XT. Dropped my load/stress temps by 20c. Extremely quiet too compared to wraith prism :cool:
     
  9. T1tan

    T1tan Member

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    I went fan. Because I don't want to worry about it, ever. I know aoi's are reliable... i just have that thought in the back of my mind that a fan is so simple, no liquid etc.

    Got the Noctua D12 chromax (all black).
     
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  10. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    I think it would be pretty rare to find a failure in the many AOI's these days. I think they are pretty darn good now.
     
  11. OP
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    Jazper

    Jazper Member

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    To back this up, on my recent research about the new AIOs, the MTBF and MTTF on the majority of pumps used is 90,000-110,000 hours which translates to about 9-10 years running 24/7.

    That said, I think evaporation and oxidation are more likely failure points than the pumps themselves.
     
  12. T1tan

    T1tan Member

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    Oh I know, but I'll likely own this PC until 2030. I expect a simple fan will survive as long as the cpu. I know a lot of it is psychological. :)

    I *wanted* aoi. I just decided against it after lots of thought. Water in my PC... If I knew there'd be a regular upgrade cycle in the future, id reconsider.
     
  13. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    And certainly for many people in this community keeping a device like this for ten years would be a rare thing.
     
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    Jazper

    Jazper Member

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    More of an issue is intel is talking about moving to a socket with 1700 pins, which means that a lot of coolers are going to become obselete
     
  15. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    Always been a constant occupational hazard for us upgraders ; )
     
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  16. Butcher9_9

    Butcher9_9 Member

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    FYI MTTF ect are pretty much just marketing wank. It does not account for component aging and everyone seems to have a different process for calculating it making comparisons between brands impossible .

    From my understanding they just take a sample setup of devices and run then until 1 fails , Multiply Failure time of 1 by sample size = MTTF . Want a big MTTF, just make sample set larger and hope one does not fail super early. I have seen products with MTTF of like 1000 000 hours (WD HDDs as an example) , pretty sure very few PC parts are going to last 114 years let alone about 50%.
     
  17. ska'

    ska' Member

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    I run a double AIO setup, that is 120mm AIO on my 1080ti & 240mm AIO on the 3900x.

    I don't think in my ITX case I could get the same cooling performance / noise levels using air, particularly for the GPU.
     
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    Jazper

    Jazper Member

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    It is wildly impractical to do tests like that over 10 years or so, so they use heat and or other methods to age test.
     
  19. connico

    connico Member

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    I've had the original H100 die on me 5 years after it was first installed. The pump died and the temps went up. It was pretty obvious and did not damage anything when it failed. I replaced the unit with a noctua that I had sitting around.

    I've recently built a 3600 and its got a H100i in it. Rock solid and pretty quite on idle. Does ramp up when load during gaming though!
     
  20. Butcher9_9

    Butcher9_9 Member

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    yeah I know , but clearly whatever they are doing is not very accurate when the figure you come out with is 114 year of continuous use when anyone with a small amount expensive will tell you 5-10 years is a more realistic MTBF for something like a HDD.
     

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