AMD socket A, retired

Discussion in 'AMD x86 CPUs and chipsets' started by grind187, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. grind187

    grind187 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2002
    Messages:
    11
    SOURCES SAID Socket A processors are become rare birds - and that means people are dumping motherboards to get rid of their stock.

    Apart from, of course, those lucky people who have their mitts on the CPUs and can play the brokerage game to their hearts content.

    And just in case you think that AMD Socket A will go on forever, this slide sent to us by an anonymous donor shows that indeed, it's gone forever.

    Bern Edit: Do not hotlink images.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, 2005
  2. Oblong Cheese

    Oblong Cheese Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2001
    Messages:
    10,595
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I'm not concerned -- it'll mean cheap Socket A fileserver systems for the home/DIY network admins. :p
     
  3. The OC

    The OC Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,594
    Location:
    Melbourne
    End of an era - a proud one for AMD, the era that they finally challenged the might of Intel. :thumbup:
     
  4. mr_mordred2095

    mr_mordred2095 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2004
    Messages:
    3,904
    Location:
    Brisbane
    It's sad to see such a great platform go.

    The best think about the K7 format is that it was soooo flexible.

    Buy a good mobo, and you could throw anything from a duron 600 to an AXP 3200+ into it.

    Love to see intel pull that one out their arse :p

    anyways..

    AMD, you've done us proud, +1 respect for a great era created by the gods themselves.
     
  5. stmok

    stmok Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2001
    Messages:
    8,878
    Location:
    Sydney
    So we can expect a few more months before the complete disappearance of Socket A CPUs and mobos?
     
  6. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2002
    Messages:
    26,849
    Location:
    Canberra
    I agree with everything said here. It's a bit sad to see such a wonderful platform disappear (not for me though - I'm still happily running a pair of Socket A systems for myself, and another two for my siblings. It'll probably be a few years before none of the main systems in this house are using K7s).

    It's certainly been interesting - we've had chipsets from Via, SiS, Nvidia, AMD, and ULi (and probably a few others); we've had CPUs up to 3Ghz; there have been people running ancient Durons on new boards, and people running new Bartons on ancient boards (I remember one OCAUer managed a Mobile Athlon XP 2500+ on an ancient Abit KT133 or KT266 board); we've seen PCI and AGP locks introduced, as well as dual-channel RAM and AGP8x (maybe even AGP4x - were the first Socket A boards still AGP2x?). ECS even pulled off PCI-E on the AXP, while Asrock managed to make a Socket A and S754 combo board; there has been SDRAM, DDR RAM, and combinations of the two; and with the K7 architecture AMD managed to beat Intel to the 1Ghz mark.

    Overall, it's been a great era.


    A few other points:

    (1) The K7 will be great as a second-hand CPU. It'll almost eliminate any worry about finding the right socket. Any Athlon/Duron/AthlonXP will fit any Socket A board, and if you get the right board you can have the choice of SD or DDR RAM.

    (2) That poster doesn't actually mean K7 production has stopped. It says they're not packaging CPUs anymore. OEM ones and embedded ones (as well as the K7-based Geodes) may still be available.

    (3) I wasn't around when the K7 was introduced, so I'll ask this question for everyone who was: when AMD announced that they were releasing a new processor mounting system (Slot A, followed by Socket A), what were your thoughts? Did everyone just say "AMD is dead. They can't afford to make their own system in a market ruled by Intel"? Or did people think it was a great move?



    What chipsets have we had for Socket A?

    Nvidia:
    Nforce
    Nforce2 - first dual-channel AXP board, first DDR400 AXP board, first with AGP/PCI locks.
    -Both had decent onboard graphics, which was a first. The NF2's Soundstorm is still un-beatable in some cases.

    SiS:
    SiS748 - AGP8x + DDR400
    SiS741 - AGP8x + DDR400 + Onboard video
    SiS741GX - SiS741 but only DDR333
    SiS746 - First AGP8x AXP chipset
    SiS740 - AGP4x + DDR266 + Onboard video
    SiS745 - SiS740 without onboard video
    SiS735 - DDR266 and PC133, AGP4x
    SiS730S - PC133 + Onboard video
    SiS730 - ??
    -Rarely used by enthusiasts, but these used to have a pretty big market as all-in-one boards.

    Via:
    KT133 - SDR
    KM133 - SDR and onboard video
    KX133 - SDR
    KT266/A - DDR
    KT333/CF - DDR
    KT400/A - DDR
    KT600 - DDR
    KT880 - DDR
    KM400 - DDR and onboard video
    KM266/A - DDR and onboard video
    -Strangely, everyone seems to hate Via. For a long time, there really wasn't a whole lot of choice.

    ULi:
    M1647 - nobody seems to have used this one in a big way. SDR + DDR (to DDR266) compliant, AGP4x.

    ALi:
    M1645

    AMD:
    AMD750 - Slot A and PC100
    AMD761 - DDR266 and AGP4x.

    That's all I can find at the moment (might add more later, as well as a list of all the K7 cores if I can find them).
     
  7. Oblong Cheese

    Oblong Cheese Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2001
    Messages:
    10,595
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Spitfire, 600-900Mhz (original Duron, 100Mhz FSB, 0.25um(?), 64k L2)
    Thunderbird, 600-1400Mhz (first Socket A Athlon, 100-133Mhz FSB, 0.22um, 256k L2)
    Palomino, 1333-1733Mhz (133Mhz FSB, 0.18um, 256k L2)
    Thoroughbred A, 1800Mhz (133Mhz FSB, 0.18um, 256k L2)
    Thoroughbred B, 1800-2200(?)Mhz (133-166Mhz FSB, 0.18um, 256k L2)
    Barton, 1200-2100(?)Mhz (166Mhz FSB, 0.18um, 512k L2)

    That's just for desktop, though all the mobile solutions were chopped up versions of the above. Mmm, you know you're a nerd when you can rattle off info like that from the top of your head (question marks indicate uncertainty!)

    Edit: Just realised I've completely left out later Duron cores -- it'll have to stay that way, because I can't remember.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2005
  8. terrabyte

    terrabyte Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2003
    Messages:
    3,066
    Location:
    Syd, 2147, near Blacktown
    The K7 was a great platform, i've still got 4 of them. I'm very sad to see them discontinued :(
     
  9. stmok

    stmok Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2001
    Messages:
    8,878
    Location:
    Sydney
    My thoughts back then...

    First : "Finally! Some competition! Intel has to lower the price now!"
    (*Remembering how Intel could basically charge anything back then*...*shiver*)

    2nd (after seeing the initial user reports/reviews) : "Not yet...But soon".
    (Mainly because early third-party chipsets weren't mature or stable...Resulting in a bad name for AMD being a bad solution as a whole.)

    Overall, it was a gutsy move from a small company, to challenge the Goliath of CPU makers and win some battles out of it with smart use of technology.

    (While others have given up or decided to do things differently and not attack the performance segment at all => VIA C3).

    AMD had a lot to loose back then, but they withstood the test of time with K7...Then built on top of it with K8 (Which is basically a highly improved K7 with integrated RAM controller, AMD64, etc).


    Don't forget the Geode NX and Sempron (Socket A).
    (Basically all Thoroughbreds, and in one case of the Sempron, a Barton).

    I'm still wondering why there isn't a Mini-ITX retail solution from AMD yet!
     
  10. Sped 1989

    Sped 1989 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Messages:
    694
    Location:
    Quakers Hill, Sydney
    Agreed, i have 3 skt A systems.
     
  11. im_soo_sxc

    im_soo_sxc Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2004
    Messages:
    581
    Location:
    Perth, WA
    I will truely miss socket A, but there will be socket A setups in my house for many years to come :D
     
  12. Dead Operative

    Dead Operative Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    414
    Location:
    Sydney
    most definitely an end of an era, they will still live on in our homes and offices

    seven different socketA cpu's (five of them came off ocau), three different motherboards. some of which will live on in my main rig and htpc :)

    nforce4 with socketA would be quite nice to have :p
     
  13. Chamelion

    Chamelion Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2001
    Messages:
    11,077
    Location:
    Strathpine, Brisbane.
    I owned a plethora of socket A gear but I certainly won't miss it.

    Matt.
     
  14. Thhhza

    Thhhza Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2003
    Messages:
    1,516
    Location:
    Melbourne
    My main and only rig is Socket A. Got this rig around 3-4 years ago starting off with a KT400 (A7V8X) chipset, then moved to nForce2 (8RDA+) chipset and now finally I have an NF7-S. Throughout this time I've only ever had 1 chip, the AIUHB 2100+ (best overclocker ever!) running at 3000+ on stock voltage but could go more. It still does everything I want it do, and until the time comes when it and the 6600GT can't handle it anymore I won't be moving over to A64 for a while. Probably until Longhorn comes out, actually, when is it going to be released?
    Well done AMD :thumbup:
     
  15. 4th

    4th Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2004
    Messages:
    821
    Location:
    qld > bne > 40xx
  16. Annihilator69

    Annihilator69 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Messages:
    6,062
    Location:
    Perth
    I always thought the Spitfire was 128k L2
    Don't forget the "Morgan" Duron core - 900-1300mhz I think, 128k L2
    Tbred B went to 2.3ghz @ 166fsb
    Barton went to 2.2ghz @ 200fsb
     
  17. Melkor1337

    Melkor1337 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    503
    I reckon there's still some use for AXP, I am buying Watercooling for mine in a few days even though I should be saving for a 64bit...
     
  18. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2002
    Messages:
    148,371
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    I did some of my best ocing on socket A systems......end of an era, but onward and upward to newer and better gear :thumbup:
     
  19. stroggos2k

    stroggos2k Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Messages:
    6,316
    Location:
    Rozelle, Sydney NSW
    You'd be right, Spitfire was 128k L2 and 64k L1.
     
  20. Dr Kildare

    Dr Kildare Medic!

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    3,905
    Location:
    Melbourne
    The Spitfire (Model 3) definately had 64K L2.
    Just did a quick wcpuid search via Google images & found this...
    http://www33.tok2.com/home/viewfinder/2001/duron/wcpuid.jpg
    ...few in the OCAU PCDB too.

    Definately be missed personally but the Slot A days started it for me - my first computer I could call me own was a Slot A Athlon 600MHz. :)

    During the course of the K7 era I've had 15 CPUs (Model 1 to Model 10) on 8 different motherboards (AMD "Irongate" 750 to nForce2)
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2005

Share This Page

Advertisement: