Amiga 500 Restoration

Discussion in 'Retro & Arcade' started by iMic, Apr 28, 2018.

  1. pelmen

    pelmen Member

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    Ask them what about if you did the prep work? whats the finish you want? No reason they cant plate if you clean and sand as smooth as you like by hand. If you want them to do it all they arent really interested, its too fiddly for the piece and those tabs easily snap. Not worth dealing with an ahole job and client. So ask them how much you need to do first to prep for plating so they can just dunk in baths etc. Can be done but just like painting or powder coating, if you prep to a point (taking the damage risks yourself) they will be more than willing to do the job and on the cheap as prep work is considerable time sink and you are paying for that labour typically.

    Other option, draw the plans and get it fabricated and folded from sheet, since any coating its taking it away from stock anyway. or find a clean item / sacrificial machine to replace.
     
  2. Sledge

    Sledge Member

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  3. power

    power Member

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    barely registers. just need to replace or remove it completely and clean around.
     
  4. Sledge

    Sledge Member

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    tried desoldering today....
    didn't work.. stupid gas solderer...
    need to find my electric one i think
     
  5. OP
    OP
    iMic

    iMic Member

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    They're fine with me doing the prep. The next round of shields have already had the rust removed and sanded out, so all I'll need to do is fine grit sand them to even out the surface finish and level any low spots where the rust was removed. The current prices I've been charged so far are assuming that I do the prep in advance, they're just cleaning and coating them.

    That would be a better long term solution, but I think having them drawn up (or verified to ensure I've drawn them correctly) and cut would be expensive for a one-off job. In volume it could possibly work. And I haven't yet found a sacrificial machine that has a shield that isn't rusty in one form or another.
     
  6. pelmen

    pelmen Member

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    Sorry I replied as I read the thread, realised my comments irrelvant to you.

    I would still try to look into the sheet option. I could have done it in highschool with what we had (cutting tricky though). Knifemakers for example get blanks cut by waterjet and laser methods for batch producing a certain model knife. I dont know it'd be a hugely expensive option. I backed a kickstarter for a product called ACase i think. Was a metal carry case with sliding drawers to carry painted miniature figurines. It was made template style cut from sheet metal and you fold and assemble yourself. Was a nice design and would work well for an amiga rf shield (various ones), instead of having to figure out how to bend a long thin edge the acase basically had it cut fine the whole length except for a few bits along the length where 1 or 2mm remained intact. It was dead easy then to bend to 90deg etc and assemble. I only have the use of one arm and had no trouble folding it all myself perfectly. Maybe look them up see what sort of costs they had?

    Then again i noticed you dont really know why you are doing all this besides the original uncompleted project you got. But the discussion may help others who want to persue. Could be a good item to model up for thingiverse for cnc/cutter hobbyists. Could be a market for custom rf shells (faraday cages after all) in various finishes, maybe a sexy gold mesh so you can install lighting inside. stuff like that :)
     
  7. OP
    OP
    iMic

    iMic Member

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    I have some unmodified pieces here to use as a template, so I suppose I could explore the option of drawing them up, having some pieces cut and then folded to make some replica shields. I haven't touched a sketching or CAD application before, but I'll need to learn to use one soon, so this could be a good introductory project. I'm finalising some details to study an engineering degree next year, so provided that goes ahead I may have more access to fabrication tools and machinery on campus as well.


    There is perhaps one reason to complete this build. Above all else, I like how the Commodore story didn't end when the company did. I enjoy seeing machines like the Amiga continue as a community project. None of the computers I've assembled have served a practical purpose. The enjoyment came from building them and occasionally using them whenever possible, and something tells me I'll find many uses for the Amiga, especially given its still active community and the various new hardware and software products being developed for it.

    (It amazes me that machines like the Commodore 64 can now be assembled from new production parts, such as the C64 Reloaded and C64C Replacement Cases, with the Amiga 500 soon to follow once the Vampire V4 Standalone and A500 Replacement Cases are available for purchase.)
     
  8. OP
    OP
    iMic

    iMic Member

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    Did some testing on the spare HE500 memory expansion card earlier. The corrosion is pretty extensive, albeit mainly on the clock side, and I've been able to repair a good deal of it, but some will require either sanding of the board to expose the copper traces underneath, or I can disconnect those lines entirely since they appear to be RTC related - the memory expansion should continue working without them, the computer just won't keep time.

    The reason the expansion isn't working appears to be the switch itself. There's no continuity across the pins no matter what position I switch it to. The switch on my good HE500 connects all three pins when the switch is on. I could replace the switch, or just remove the switch, wire an always-on jumper there and be done with it.

    I've tested the second Floppy Drive as well, and discovered that doesn't work. No idea why, but capacitors could be an issue since it sounds like the head is moving erratically, but the mechanism is fine. Someone's already documented the repair process, and it doesn't look difficult at all, provided that's the issue. Otherwise I don't need a second drive anyway, and even if I did, Amiga compatible drives are reasonably common.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018

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