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Another REVIEW: VIA's EPIA EN15000

Discussion in 'Other CPUs and chipsets' started by stmok, May 8, 2006.

  1. stmok

    stmok Member

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    http://www.sfftech.com/index.php?/articles/show/via_epia_en15000_review/

    Unlike Epiacenter.com, they've included ScienceMark 2 and HD-playback tests.

    Naturally, it cannot handle HD playback all that well without some sort of assistance. (in fact, its pretty poor. I'm guessing the reviewer is experiencing alot of frame skipping).

    But we got a better glimpse of how it performs in the FPU part against the C3-Based solution. (50% increase in speed, over 100% increase in FPU performance).

    This review does confirm with Epiacenter's one in regards to SiSoft Sandra and HD playback. The EPIA EN-series does have a VIA VT1625M HDTV Encoder, but VIA's piss-poor effort with the drivers (both Linux AND Windows) is gonna make this feature a paper weight. (Unless they can get their act together!)...Then again, I wonder if the encoder does anything to help Hd playback. :Paranoid:
     
  2. orF

    orF Member

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    These little boards and cpu's were good once, but I don't see any worth in them anymore...

    They'd make a decent central file-server/hub/firewall box though.

    If you get a Pentium-M or Turion mini-itx setup with a decent passive video card from nVidia like the 6200 or 6600, then you'd have a great HTPC, small and quiet and capable.
    But even that wouldn't be worth it, when you could just get a PS3 heh.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    stmok

    stmok Member

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    Because a PS3 isn't as flexible as a PC.

    Besides, I doubt Sony will let you have access to the API so you can take full advantage of the PS3 when you run Linux with it. (It will come with Linux, but its really basic stuff...You're gonna need to reverse engineer stuff if you want to utilise the Nvidia solution inside or bypass Blu-ray's security features).
     
  4. orF

    orF Member

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    Who needs to do those things?
    You could probably rig it up to serve internet via 802.11b/g, you could probably rig it up to use an encrypted tunnel.
    You could probably rig it up to play xvid/matroska media you leech off the net.
    It could easily do everything anyone already does with a HTPC.

    All Sony would need to do is make some basic simple software to do all those things.
    And even if they don't it shouldn't take long for people to hack something together to perform those common functions.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    stmok

    stmok Member

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    Hackers. Their view is to study and understand how things work.

    If it means to break, bypass, and modify things, they'll do it. (Crackers will exploit these to their greed and ego)...Actually, PS3 would be the perfect platform to study how you would bypass Blu-ray security, so you can play Blu-ray movies on regular PC-based Linux boxes. (once you install Blu-ray drives on them).

    Sony is (in a sense) less of a challenge than Microsoft in this area, as MS delibrately locked things down. But they forgot the optical drive firmware!

    But buying a PS3 just to do things a regular PC with Linux can do, isn't much of a challenge and it isn't interesting. To be able to make things (that you can't do on a regular x86 box), work on a PS3 would be. To exploit the Cell processor would be quite an interesting exercise in itself. :)
     
  6. kona_boy

    kona_boy Member

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    And you actually think Sony, or any company, would do that ?!
     

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