Anti static in the IT environment

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by Segression, Feb 12, 2014.

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What is your opinion on anti-static in the workplace

  1. 100% Essential, must be grounded out at all times

    12.0%
  2. Does not matter, tap the case every few minutes

    52.5%
  3. Aint nobody got time fo dat

    35.4%
  1. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    No. the bags are conductive (inside and out) so static has no chance to build up. Also means as soon as you touch the bag, any potential static is equalised between you, the device in/on the bag and the bag itself. no difference in potential, no problems.

    I'd never run a component sitting on a bag, they are conductive, so could short something out when there's power flowing through it. If you must run something not in a proper case, use the cardboard box instead.
     
  2. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    I had it drilled into me about static electricity..

    I used to be soo nervous building pc's, id do in kitchen and touch kitchen tap so often to ground myself

    fast forward to now ive built over 50 pc's on carpet, no dramas :thumbup:
     
  3. moloko vellocet

    moloko vellocet Member

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    Cool - there you go. :) As I mentioned, I was taught this and have played by this rule since but always happy to learn more on the subject. Regardless of what the bags are actually doing, if I'm setting up an open-air system (as the very large majority of systems I use are), I always use either the motherboard cardboard box or create a platform using a motherboard PCB (purely the PCB, no components - neat prize from when I competed in MSI MOA) and some motherboard stand-off mounts. Either option does the trick nicely. :thumbup:
     
  4. flinchy

    flinchy Member

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    I don't think i've ever touched a computer/component without leaning on the metal chassis

    never bothered with a wrist strap or anything.
     
  5. c_hegge

    c_hegge Member

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    I never use wrist straps or anything, but I usually just touch the case before I work on a PC (which I pretty much have to do anyway to get the sides off).
     
  6. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    ooh got pics of said nude PCB
     
  7. AthlonMan

    AthlonMan (Banned or Deleted)

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    No time for it.
     
  8. qwertylesh

    qwertylesh Member

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    checkout the gams on that hot cast of enamel and copper! :eek:
     
  9. moloko vellocet

    moloko vellocet Member

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    Off topic, but you're lucky I had a photo on my phone. The downer though is that it's a poor low light photo which lost even more quality to get down under the 500kb limit for OCAU Pix... But you get the idea. :p


    Click to view full size!


    The PCB is from an ATX form factor MSI P45 Diamond and mounted on it for a test platform is an ASUS Maximus VI Impact mini-ITX motherboard.

    I have been thinking about making some ATX or even EATX platforms like this using acrylic and providing them to the Australian OC community for purchase either as something for work or as a Team.AU initiative. The problem is that it could end up being a lot of hassle with none to minimal interest as a motherboard box works just as well. :confused:
     
  10. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    pretty cool. thanks.
     
  11. Aetherone

    Aetherone Member

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    That's probably the most reliable MSI product ever made!*:shock: :tongue: :thumbup:

    note* I dealt with MSI products in the early 00's :wired:
     
  12. Euphoreia

    Euphoreia Member

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    Have been working on computers daily for about 13 years, never used any anti-static practices, never killed a component due to static.
     
  13. wraith666

    wraith666 Member

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    Really depends on the environment. If it's just lino floors and working on a wood table I just ground my self out on a metal part of the case. If it's carpet I take extra precautions.
     
  14. Doograsss

    Doograsss Member

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    You should always wear anti-static. It doesnt matter that "you haven't ever killed a component in XXX years", you almost definitely have.

    In the good old days, TTL devices were relatively robust and might survive an ESD. These days all IC's use CMOS (or similar) technology, which is extremely sensitive to static. These days most CMOS devices build in some form of ESD protection, but the protection is only good to a certain level, and a certain amount of abuse.

    Every time you put a charge (beyond the Vcc/GND) through a I/O of an IC, you're changing the substrate, doing damage that can cause all sorts of spurious behaviour before the I/O dies. In the case that ESD protection is built into the board/IC, you're damaging the protection and the I/O to a lesser extent.

    People who say "I dont need it because of XXX" have forced designers to put protection on interface boundaries etc, increasing cost and complexity. I'll admit one positive of this is ESD protection stops damage resulting from signal over/undershoot, but that's hardly the same thing.

    Grounding yourself works for the instant you're grounded, but not the moment you stop touching whatever bit of metal you think is grounded.

    *Sigh* Rant Over

    Now go back to damaging your equipment
     
  15. Euphoreia

    Euphoreia Member

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    I almost definitely haven't. I've built and repaired more computers than most people have changed underwear (literally). My point is, IF it happens, you best not go outside, because you're likely to get hit by lightning, your luck is THAT bad.

    Now go back to strapping on your tin foil hat.
     
  16. qwertylesh

    qwertylesh Member

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    It's fair to say there would be a good portion of people who frequent this forum who can easily say the same. and be correct
     
  17. mAJORD

    mAJORD Member

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    I'm sure if I looked hard enough, I'd see the same people saying " I've never killed anything" also having a thread somewhere where, at some stage on the forums there CPU/mobo/GPU died or is acting up.

    and if I did find this, I bet they'd deny it had anything to do with ESD damage, despite having no way to prove that it wasnt!.

    This subject has been done many many times, over many many yrs with the same result.

    It is real, if it wasn't real I can absolutely assure you, the multi billion dollar companies would NOT bother with the insanely expensive ESD:

    -procedures
    -disapiative floors, benches, trays, tools, equipment
    -personal coats
    -wrist straps
    -shoes or ankle straps

    and of course, the relatively expensive packaging, and warning labels on the end product.

    Now of course it does not mean assembling your PC , or even 20 Pc's on the carpet will damage or destroy components. But if the conditions are right, the potential is there (no pun) , and eventually you will damage something, as I said, you may not know for some time.

    on the same token, it doesn't mean you need to go to the extremes of the manufacturers environment either. Those that are mindful enough to at least ground themselves often, avoid direct contact with pins and work on surfaces not prone to static charge will probably never have a problem.. or at least, the chances would be a quite slim.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2014
  18. DarkForceMage

    DarkForceMage Member

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    The IT environment can be pretty broad imo, I'm sure in some cases "better safe than sorry" applies if the hardware is critical, extremely expensive & being upgraded or maintained, even the smallest risk of downtime isn't worth it when you can just wear a strap, but if it's just basic consumer parts & PC building/repair, grounding & handling the parts properly is enough.
     
  19. t8y

    t8y Member

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    haha yep, i had that happen last year.
    paid something like $10 for postage too, and it came in an envelope wrapped in the type of plastic bag you get from a supermarket to put fruits/vegetables in.
    envelope had a standard stamp on it.

    obviously left bad feedback, i mean come on, you pay $10 you expect them to expend that on actual postage costs.


    anyway on topic, no, i just ground myself on the case i'm working on.
    also had it drilled into me during school and TAFE/A+ hardware courses.

    i've not dealt with anything mission critical though, just a lot of general office PCs, not near as many rich kids gamer PCs and a lot of my own toying around.

    out of all the hardware i've dealt with in the past 15 years cannot recall any failures that i'd put down to static.
    though who knows, there may be one or two unexplained ones in there that wasnt "maybe it was a dodgy PSU".
     
  20. alch

    alch Member

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    Its OCAU brah. We're all experts here.

    anti-static devices are sold just to make a few bucks out of the newbies. ;)
     

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