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Any woodworkers?

Discussion in 'Other Toys/Hobbies' started by Arch-Angel, Nov 11, 2016.

  1. T1tan

    T1tan Member

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    Not in person at this stage (high risk family members for covid).

    For the most part they look pretty flimsy when in my price range (sub2k) but I could just be talking porkies :) I have noted after reading this thread that there are a few options like the sherwood contractor saw that may be able to fit the bill, if a little bigger than I currently think that I can store - but the wheels / stand may make up for that size issue but being able to be shifted around easily.
     
  2. Radley

    Radley Member

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    So if I wanted to accurately cut sheets of ply say 700mm wide, what would be the best option?
     
  3. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Honestly, ripping it down to as close as possible with a circular saw, and then cutting it down to 700mm on the table saw.

    Max depth of 400mm only means there is 400mm of space between the saw blade and the outermost position of the fence.

    So for example, if you had a sheet of plywood that was 1200mm by 2400mm, you could cut it down to 800mm.
     
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  4. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    That is a good option, being a proper free standing saw. But portability is heavily restricted (even in a garage) as most often rhe bases are cast iron and weigh a ton. But yes. It's a nice saw.

    But if you still want full portability. The dealt saw and stand (roughly 1500 combined) is a solid option.
     
  5. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Good point!

    Any tips on cutting straight with a circ saw? I'm going to start cutting my plyo box tomorrow or on the weekend, but never really used one before. I'll practice first on a sacrificial piece of ply but I've only got 1 chance for the final as I don't have any other space. I borrowed dads shitty Ozito saw but ended up buying a blade that cost more than it just to give it the best chance.
     
  6. T1tan

    T1tan Member

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    straight edge (another piece of wood or a level etc) and clamps as your guide.

    Aldi have clamps going real cheap right now @ $10 for 2. They're probably worth $10 in quality but if you get 50 uses out of them, which you will, they'll do until you realise what you really want, or they'll last a very long time.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2022
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  7. fnp

    fnp Member

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    I have the Dewalt job site saw I bought second hand for around $400 and I've been very happy with it. As long as you don't mind carefully calibrating it and use a good quality fence (I have some Ingra items) it's brilliant value for money. A second hand unit from the likes of Timbecon or Carbatec is a step up but not as much as you might think and in Perth at least don't come up for sale often. The Dewalt can also take dado blades, if that's important to you. The adjustment mechanisms are solid and hold their settings well. Build infeed/outfeed tables if you need - I built one with wheels mounted to the side face of the leg, so I can tip it up and move it around my shed as a multipurpose type thing.

    As far as dust extraction, I use mine coupled to my shopvac. I do think dust extraction is fairly important, you shouldn't be breathing in too much sawdust. Also, wear a mask and for god's sake use pushsticks to move your material through the saw.

    For ripping plywood, I clamp it to my workbench and other bench with a gap in between so my circular saw doesn't gouge my benches. I use a length of right angle steel as a guide clamped to the plywood. It's a bit of dicking around to set up but it guarantees straight cuts. The measure twice, cut once thing applies here. Use a sacrificial piece of timber at the end of the cut to prevent tear out damaging your work piece - this applies to cutting in general but especially with power cutting.
     
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  8. ShadowBurger

    ShadowBurger Member

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    super important on plywood - that shit always throws a chunk of the bottom layer
     
  9. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Yeah clamp a straight edge. I use an accucut. Fantastic for straight cuts.
     
  10. T1tan

    T1tan Member

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    Cheers for that, how hard was it to replace the fence? I've been thinking that more or less any straight firing table saw with an aftermarket fence may well be the solution. Every review I've seen seems to complain about fences on sub 2k models.
     
  11. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Fence replacement is as simple as finding one you like and buying it. Most of the branded ones use the same clamping mechanism.
     
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  12. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Thanks guys. Took 5-10mm off the end of a piece of ply that I was using for a shelf that was sticking out and used a cheapo clamping straight edge (Craftwrong) and screwed a sacrificial piece to the end. Cut straight and super clean.

    Good to know there's lots of fences, extensions and bits and pieces you can buy for the job site saws, that makes me feel beter in getting one. I saw a Festool table extension for $546! I know it's Festool, but that's taking the piss.
     
  13. fnp

    fnp Member

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    Might start a religious war here but Festool stuff is badly overpriced, IMHO. There's plenty of excellent options available for reasonable prices in just about any market segment you care to name.
     
  14. apsilon

    apsilon Member

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    While I'd love to have a table saw I just don't have the room. It's slower and less convenient but don't dismiss a track saw instead, especially if you pair it with parallel guides. Can't do everything a table saw can but it can do most. That's what I have but still hope to get a table saw some day.
     
  15. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Give me one good example of a replacement tool for a festool domino. Lol

    I don't have one, but would happily sell my left nut for one.
     
  16. apsilon

    apsilon Member

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    I have one, wouldn't trade it for anything, it's simply amazing. I do agree that Festool is largely over priced however.
     
  17. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Oh definitely. And not even just the tool itself. The domino's themselves are pretty pricey as well.

    But their sanders are amazing. Drills are much of a muchness. It's all about the domino. Haha
     
  18. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Check out this build.
    Looks fairly overkill but I love it.
     
  19. oculi

    oculi Member

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    I just use dowels, but if you are making money and not just firewood then a domino portably makes sense, as do many festools.

    Also regarding a number of comments I'm going to go out on a limb and say a jointer (plane/buzzer to Aussies) is not required for almost everything I've seen in this thread.
     
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  20. Andres

    Andres Motor Admin

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    I'd love a table saw, but my shed/workshop is a) too small, b) don't want to fill with sawdust - so often do big cuts in the carport.

    My ancient circular saw is due for replacment (the switch sometimes doesn't click off - nice and safe - and pulling it apart to clean hasn't resolved). Trying to understand what the benefits of a plunge saw are over a tradtinoal circular saw. That Kreg Accu-cut looks good too.
    (Have a drop saw for that type of stuff)
     

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