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Any woodworkers?

Discussion in 'Other Toys/Hobbies' started by Arch-Angel, Nov 11, 2016.

  1. T1tan

    T1tan Member

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    alright i want one! :D
     
  2. Zee

    Zee Member

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    Should see the bathroom door they did for the guest bathroom - I have to replace the door entirely. It truly messes with my own OCD - I'm just glad I am actually enjoying woodworking, even if it is just making other people's work straight and square for now.

    Don't even get me started on the ability of the locals to find new, unique and interesting ways to destroy my tools. The glass maker dropped my 12v circular saw into a bucket of water last week, which somehow was sitting directly under where he was working on the steel frame where he was cutting acrylic panels to size.

    He put it into a bag of rice (plentiful here!) for all of 3 minutes before he decided it was time to start using it again. I now have to wait until his last bill before I can deduct it, otherwise he'll just add it to his bill and I'll be left holding the bag (again)...

    And speaking of destroying tools, someone literally, as I am typing this, informed me that my 18V circular saw is not working *eyeroll*.

    Z...
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2022
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  3. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Air compressors are one of the handiest tools in the garage. Great for cleaning/dusting shit out the door :)
     
  4. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Yeah, I've got a home made track saw, but it's not the same. I very desperately wanna get a kreg accucut and a decent plunge router, rather than my circular saw I a slide. Haha
     
  5. /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

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    With my limited knowledge I would say that as the voltage is the same, the current draw will be virtually the same and there shouldn’t be an issue with that (compared to using a 110V appliance :lol:).
    For your main concern, the frequency, the motor will spin slightly faster (+20%) and as long as that 20% in rpm doesn’t exceed the rating of the blade all should be fine.
    Commensurately, running a device over its optimal operating condition will have some impact on overall life, depends on how much it’s used.
    Of course run this past the brains trust in Electonics & Electrics
     
  6. Radley

    Radley Member

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    I finished my box! Only took 3 weeks because I didn't have time, but I'm stoked with the result. Learned a lot in the process including Fusion360 which I'll probably use for work when I can.
    Tools I used were circular saw, jigsaw, drill, random orbital sander and brad nailer. Figuring out the notches (tenons??) was the most complex bit as I ended up using the mortice as the template for the tenon. I know a box isn't very spectacular, but it was a fun process and it's a good start.

    20220219_103125.jpg
     
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  7. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Man that's great!
     
  8. apsilon

    apsilon Member

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    Maybe I missed it but I didn't realise you were making a plyo box. Any internal bracing?
     
  9. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Nope. The box itself is quite rigid and it's made from 12mm ply. I can always add it if I think it needs it down the track though.

    Thank you. Might test it out today with some box squats and step ups.
     
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  10. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    It's actually difficult when you don't have a proper sized workbench :(

    Literal blood, sweat and tears went into this...


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Radley

    Radley Member

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    I hear you. I'm thinking about building a moveable bench/storage but something like that needs a lot of planning, especially if I'm looking at getting rid of a big steel cabinet. At least selling the cabinet would buy a bit of the materials needed.

    I see you've got a thicknesser but do you have a jointer? Do you reckon one is needed?
     
  12. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Tested yesterday and it's great for box squats. Did some step ups and I'm not so sure.
     
  13. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    I do have a jointer. Its sitting just behind that black rubbish bin. Haha

    Unless you're milling your own wood, nah, it's not needed.

    And yes, strongly encourage having a workbench of some sort.
     
  14. Zee

    Zee Member

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    I found someone with a CNC machine to make me an MFT top - bought a sheet of 18mm birch ply, and going to make a couple of 600 x 1200 bench tops. One will be fixed in the garage, the other will be a portable/fold up job that I can carry around the house to I can work on any level of the house, and not keep carrying stuff up and down (we have 4 levels total). I should have them both in about a week - I'm quite excited! Cost about $50 total, so not a bad price, either.

    Z...
     
  15. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Here's a question for the brains trust.

    I'm replacing my deck pickets/balustrade, going from pine to merbau.

    The ladies waist has got a rebate in it for the pickets to slot into when being nailed. However, the pine is 16mm or so and the merbau is 18mm and they won't slot in.

    I've got about 350 to do, what would be the easiest way of either skimming 2mm off the top 10mm of the pickets?
    I've been on the fence about buying a trim router for a while, and my best thought at present is to make a little jig I can drop the pickets onto and then just use a straight cut bit on one side only.

    Can't really see any other easy way?
     
  16. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Honestly, I'd use a table saw :D

    Holding the end of the picket vertical, run it along the fence, and you'd barely take away a kerfs width to remove 2mm.

    That's the quick and less safe way. The longer but safe way would be to use a trim router.
     
  17. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    What's cheaper to buy, a table saw or a trim router :lol:

    Really there's a lack of suitable tools, I've got some old planes which would probably do it. But being hardwood and a small piece I really don't want to be there for days.
     
  18. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Ahh. Soz I shouldn't assume everybody has a table saw. Haha

    Get a trim router (not plunge). Should be able to get one for about $100 from bunnings or any hardware store really.
     
  19. /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

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    What about coming from the other direction?
    Running the router along the rebate?
     
  20. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Yeah thought about it, not sure how I'd consistently get the same 2mm all the way down it. Would need to run a straight edge along it for a guide for the router or make up a jig, just not sure what that jig would look like.

    On top of that it's already primed so I'd have to hit it with fresh paint, and the pickets are bare so I've got to paint them anyway. It's a bit of a muchness.
     

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