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Any woodworkers?

Discussion in 'Other Toys/Hobbies' started by Arch-Angel, Nov 11, 2016.

  1. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Some progress!

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  2. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    So I'm pretty happy with how this is going. Plugging along. Few hours here, few hours there. Just had a couple of days straight sanding and then a couple painting. Boy do I wish I had an air compressor and paint gun.

    Step 1: Frame Assembly.

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    Step 2: Draws Assemble!

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    (This is the biggest fuck up of the build - The pocket holes should've been on the outside of the drawers, not the inside)
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    Step 3: Prepping and Painting! (I honestly just used cheap paint for this - As this is a 'prototype' for future projects).
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    Step 4: On the run!(ers)

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    Step 5: Face lift!

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    This is fuck up number 2, I could've scrapped the whole front, but eh. When cutting, the finger joints broke apart. The bottom 2 are from the same piece of board. One cutting the top to size, it split. So had to go with a piece that was left over from another project. As you can see, the grain is very much not matched. I hope it triggers some OCD peeps, as much as it triggers me :D
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  3. fnp

    fnp Member

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    Woodworkers bible trick #16. Claim that it was by design and the grain orientation is for contrast.
     
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  4. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Well I'm sorta taking it as a design idea, and I'm going to use angled grain for the top, so it sorta feeds into it...
     
  5. apsilon

    apsilon Member

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    While annoying it's fairly minor. You can always plug/fill them if you want to make them less obvious.
     
  6. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Nah, personally I don't care (I'm keeping this one) but in the future, I'm going to make sure I use pocketholes on the outside.
     
  7. T1tan

    T1tan Member

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    anyone got any recommendation for countersink bits?
     
  8. lennie

    lennie Member

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    In wood it doesn't really matter. Cheap ones are fine.

    The countersink with pilot drill and depth stop will give a nicer and much more consistent result if you are using them ongoingly just be sure to get one that has adjustable depth of countersink and pilot bit. Also get the correct gauge: https://sydneytools.com.au/product/snappy-tools-snapcsds4mmt-4mm-drill-counter-sink-with-depth-stop

    If you are just after a once off small job countersink. You can just use a larger drill bit slightly larger than the head of the screw. Be careful, they tend to bite on over sink. Light pressure and slow speed for this method. Dull drill bit is ideal.

    Other options include spade and Forsnter bits.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2022
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  9. stiben

    stiben Member

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    I do this to countersink wood but simply run the larger bit in reverse to stop it biting :)
     
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  10. millen

    millen Member

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    What are people's recommendations for dust extraction?

    After setting up outside yesterday to cut some MDF with the jigsaw (yuck), I'm definately keen to get something setup ...

    I have Makita tools, so staying in that eco system, their VC3012MX1 looks like a good Class M vacuum for the price.
    https://www.makita.com.au/building-.../vc3012mx1-30l-wet-dry-dust-extraction-vacuum

    Otherwise heard Festool are a good option, although the Makita looks better than the similarly priced Festool...

    Not looking at setting up a full on in place dust collector just yet, don't have enough time to be that busy out there, but something like above I can set up under the work bench at attach to my tools, then use the floor head or anything afterwards looks like it would work well ..
     
  11. apsilon

    apsilon Member

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    Not a recommendation as such because I haven't used anything similar so have nothing to compare to (my previous vac was a very old karcher which was barely OK for doing the car) but I have a CT Midi with the cyclone separator. Works well IMO and the separator extends the life of the bags massively so will eventually offset the initial investment. I will mention the CT and separator will not work together out of the box. A simple hose connector needs to be changed from right angle to straight but this part is not sold by Festool in Aust and Festool doesn't allow retailers to sell outside their own markets so what I expected to be easy was a real PITA. I've since got a 3D printer and could probably now design and make one but couldn't at the time.

    I will also say the bluetooth remote is absolutely fantastic. Being able to strap it to the end of the hose so you can turn the vac on and off without having to walk to and from the vac is just fantastic. It really is the little things some times.
     
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  12. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Festool is miles ahead of anything else. But, massively priced.



    So todays very quick project. Needed another shelf (and it had to fit a specific place in both height and length).

    Couple of hours later (I had a bit of a play on the bandsaw - Don't like it :D)

    It was going to be a straight diagonal from top to bottom (top shelf is 200mm while very bottom is 340) but thought it wouldn't look great. Tried some creativity :D

    Middle shelf has a cross panel at the back to help support weight - MDF is a heavy sumbitch. Very bottom shelf has a toekick.

    Unsure if I want to add a couple of dividers in middle to help support weight (there's another already built cabinet that will sit directly ontop of this, hence the overhang of the sides) - Ideally, I'd have liked to have the top shelf sit on top of the sides.


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  13. garfield2k

    garfield2k Member

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    currently making a round dining table (1.4m diameter) out of spotted gum and looking to put a large bevel on top as pictured below. what is the best way to do this? I dont want to buy a router bit specifically for this one use (plus the bit would be too large for handheld use and top is to too large/heavy for swing it round to use on the router table). was thinking of using a 45deg router bit first then using the belt sander to get the angle I want. any other suggestions to do this?

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  14. fnp

    fnp Member

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    That would be pretty easy to do with just a handplane even across the grain, assuming it's decently sharp. Mark out your desired bevel dimensions with a pencil and plane towards it, cleaning up with 240 grit down to however smooth you want it. That would be my preferred method and it would be quicker than you'd imagine with less risk of going wrong.
     
  15. garfield2k

    garfield2k Member

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    even for a round table you reckon? ill try that out on some scrap and see if it works...
     
  16. oculi

    oculi Member

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    I don't reclon. do you have a tablesaw?
     
  17. garfield2k

    garfield2k Member

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    yes...and just done a quick search on jigs - kind of like doing raised panels...table top is vertical and rotates, raising the blade as you go. definitely interesting..
     
  18. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    I use a fan and broom. All I'm looking for is to get the dust away from the job so I can see the workings, not a cleanup, and a small high speed fan does the job well. I have a couple of high speed 60mm fans screwed to a small block of wood which I can move around easily, powered by a small 12v/12Ah sla battery I picked up a few years ago from ebay for a project. Small high speed fans work better than larger slower fans to clear dust from the workings and are easily moved around the benchtop as required.
    Not as fancy as a vacuum but cheap, easy and highly effective. Even if I was using a vacuum I'd be vacuuming the floor after the job is finished anyway,
     
  19. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    This is why you don't change design plans spontaneously. :D

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  20. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Now you're going to have to look into moving your door.

    I want to put a tee on my air compressor and have one end run a hose to the other end of the wall to a hose rell, and the other have a hose next to the compressor. What fittings would you recommend?? I'm new to air compressors.
     

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