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Any woodworkers?

Discussion in 'Other Toys/Hobbies' started by Arch-Angel, Nov 11, 2016.

  1. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    IMO, that won't ever correct. If you insert C channel, it'll still eventually buckle, or it'll crack. It's evidently had too much moisture in it. Drum sander won't ensure a properly flat surface, but can get it pretty close. CNC wouldn't be worth it. Cost would be extreme.

    Most joinery shops could run it through their industrial planer, but will require steps of finishing it after the fact. Using the planer itself would be less than $100
     
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  2. fnp

    fnp Member

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    You can't really just screw a rigid leg to a wide flat board like that. It'll bow and cup as the timber expands and contracts in response to humidity, exactly as you've seen. You're supposed to attach a table top to a frame or legs using methods which are not rigidly fixed in each direction and allow for movement. There are fittings made specifically to do this, or you can attach your screws through a slotted hole. There's probably not anything really wrong with the tabletop except that it's been rigidly attached to those legs.

    This is how to do it. This page explains it well.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Nah, that much cupping, Z clips weren't going to help with that. Chances are, it'd have continued to warp and pulled the clips free.
     
  4. Radley

    Radley Member

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    Surely it would have been better if the wood was properly dried in the first place?
     
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  5. ShadowBurger

    ShadowBurger Member

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    Your best bet here is cut the bench top into planks, thickness them (any timber yard can do this for you) then glue back together. for this kind of desk there's no need for dowels or biscuits, just glue. Ask your timber yard how wide they can machine planks - you might find you only have to cut it in halves or thirds to fit through their machine.

    Their machine will face and square all four sides in one pass perfectly - way less hassle than trying to do it yourself.

    Drum sanding is one possibility but good luck finding one
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2022
  6. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    I don't think he's able to do any of the work himself... Also, there's no guaranteeing planing them will even correct the problem.
     
  7. ShadowBurger

    ShadowBurger Member

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    true, they could still warp
     
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  8. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    From my experience if it's warped, and you use it, you're going to be buying new timber and doing it again.
     
  9. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Just saw this. No, that wouldn't have caused the warping. No where near enough pressure. And a steel insert was never going to correct this.

    He glued up the boards correctly ( Grain up/down/up/down etc), BUT I do notice that the front most board doesn't even make sufficient contact with the board next to it. Super amateur work.

    Sorry man, but that's going to have to be completely resawn and reglued (IE splitting the boards and regluing them to form the panel).

    It looks like the woodworker didn't alternate the clamping pattern either (top/bottom) to ensure equal pull. Really basic stuff that anybody charging for this sort of woodwork.

    What sort of timber was it?
     
  10. Tiddly

    Tiddly Member

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    Thanks for the insights all. I'm definitely not equipped to correct this myself with space being the primary concern because I'm in an apartment.

    The tabletop is made from Spotted Gum.

    Sounds like my best bet is going to be a timber yard to flatten it. However, I'm hopeful someone one here might "know a guy" in Sydney that could correct it, resize it, add c-channels and perhaps even refinish? Open to recommends also.

    However at 32mm (when made) I'm not sure there's going to be enough thickness left to achieve what I would want? By the it was corrected it could be 24-28mm thick. Thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2022
  11. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    28mm left is incredibly optimistic. If they only flatten one side (not recommended) it'll entirely change the integrity of the timber, exposing parts that previously were not exposed.

    That cup looks to be about 8mm deep. Personally, I'd take it to 24mm MINIMUM, if I did it at all.

    Unfortunately, my contacts are only in Canberra and Melbourne :D

    If you ring around, you'll find someone willing. Work is slow for a lot of people right now.
     
  12. apsilon

    apsilon Member

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    I've never used them but a few months ago I ran into the bloke that runs www.zellers.com.au while helping a mate move some stuff. Had a peek at the workshop and they're well kitted out and from their website and Facebook they seem to do good work. Not sure it'd be something he'd even be interested in but if Thornleigh is a convenient location it might be worth making an enquiry.
     
  13. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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  14. underskore

    underskore Member

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    Something tell me you've got a good timber hookup (or non-shallow pockets)
     
  15. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Me? Nah. That stuff is about $2bf. It's just ash. The benefit is, I have the ability to joint it and plane it at home. Most builders can't even do that (but tbh they don't need to). I only go to Bunnings for fasteners these days :D (It's so cheap because I buy it unsurfaced - Meaning, it's not smooth and potentially not flat/square).

    But yes. Non-shallow pockets does help... I usually buy timber at about 30-40bf (board feet) at a time, and slowly work my way through that. It'd be a hell of a lot more, but timber in Aus is incredibly restrictive :(
     
  16. T1tan

    T1tan Member

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    This thread is giving me a chubby.
    What do you do with the [it's not smooth and potentially not flat/square] wood to make it workable?

    I'm looking to get into wood working as over the Christmas break I decided I liked watching woodworking stuff, I want to build a "fold out" garage workshop, custom desk and a few other things over time. The thing that erks me currently is that, here in canberra at least, bunnings quality of wood is more or less crap - and I don't know how to improve on it or where to begin looking for the gooderer stuff.
     
  17. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    I use a jointer and a planer to surface 2 sides (makes it flat). So you run an edge through a jointer, and then the face through the jointer or planer, depending on its size.

    Bunnings is absolute shit for timber. Overpriced, poor selection. It's essentially pine for days. And pine is boring.

    These guys used to be good (in Queenbeyan) Haven't been there in a while though. https://www.ajaa.com.au/


    These guys too! https://www.thors.com.au/slabs-one-off-timbers

    I basically buy timber that builders would use (joists/beams etc) and resaw it down to size, bought directly from a building supplies store that's locally owned.
     
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  18. Radley

    Radley Member

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    I need a good timber hookup. There's bloody good hardwood up here (blackbutt) but it's seriously hard wood and I don't have the proper tools to work with it or the need to make garage shelves out of it. I need to find a place with quality 2x4 as Bunnings sells boomerangs.

    Do you guys used any software to design your builds?
     
  19. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Go to building suppliers instead of bunnings. Price will be comparable, but better quality.

    https://www.agnewbuildingsupplies.com.au/products/brand/116/coffs-harbour-hardwoods

    And yeah, I use Google Sketchup. Mostly to get size comparisons (helps to visualise).
     
  20. Radley

    Radley Member

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    I've never had any luck with that so I might have to watch some tutorials. Sketchlist3D looks really good, but the demo is really (REALLY) limited and basically pointless as you can't do custom pieces of timber.

    Just found about Kreg who look awesome. Keen to buy the K4 pocket hole jig, corner clamp and crosscut station. Anyone have any experience with these?
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2022

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