Anyone know what causes this?

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting Help' started by garrydfrench, Aug 25, 2017.

  1. garrydfrench

    garrydfrench New Member

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    Hello all.
    I started getting this problem some time ago and it is getting worse with every passing day. Sometimes it locks the screen and I have to log off/on to continue.
    I tried a different monitor and it still happens. So it's not the monitor.
    I built this system about 10-12 years ago and while I can afford to repair it, I can't afford to replace it.
    My system is;
    ASUS P5E M/B
    Intel Core2Duo E8500 CPU
    8GB DDR2 1066 RAM
    2GB AMD Radeon HD 5900 Series
    Various SSDs & HDDs

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. guy.incogneto

    guy.incogneto Member

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    If it's not the cable. It's the gfx card artifacting

    Try on board (Mobo) monitor output to test. If that works fine, then new gfx card is needed.
    Or try the oven method lol
     
  3. OP
    OP
    garrydfrench

    garrydfrench New Member

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    Thanks for the reply.

    I don't think this M/B has a on board graphics controller.

    What is the oven method? I have never heard of that.
     
  4. guy.incogneto

    guy.incogneto Member

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    I don't know if people still do it. But when graphics cards used to artifact. People would put them in the oven for a few minutes. Look it up, see if it's been debunked since.

    I did it once and the gfx card worked again for a while
     
  5. Agg

    Agg Administrator

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    If it's a dry solder joint, heating the card can make the solder re-flow a bit and sometimes re-join the joint. But obviously it's a bit of a lottery, you might just fry the card or have no effect at all. :)
     
  6. daehenoc

    daehenoc Member

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    Motherboards, video cards and whatnot have solder joints on them, and some solder joints are good and last ages, and some are not so good and can crack and lose the electrical connection that they are intended to keep.

    Setting your oven to about 300 degrees C and cooking your motherboard/videocard/PS3 motherboard will 're-flow' some of the solder joints, i.e. melt the solder just a little bit and restore the electrical connection.

    I used this method successfully on my fat PS3 twice to get it going again, when it started failing. Using this method you can damage the components built into the motherboard, so you may fix the solder joints, but wreck the motherboard anyway!

    +1 to what guy.incogneto said, try another video output. Eliminate components until you can point to one thing and go 'this is broken'.

    Edit: damn, Agg beat me to it!
     
  7. Bold Eagle

    Bold Eagle Member

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    Have you pulled card/s cleaned copper contacts with Metho, dried then replaced?

    What OS are you running and what drivers?
     
  8. Sphinx2000

    Sphinx2000 Member

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    I would be happy if desktop components were designed to last more than 8 years, let alone 10-12.
    Any feasible "repair" would consist of replacing parts - probably start with the graphics card, or at least borrow a friends if possible.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    garrydfrench

    garrydfrench New Member

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    Unfortunately I don't have another graphics card to try.

    I just thought someone may have seen the problem before and knew the cause.

    I run a dual boot system - Windows 7 & Windows 10 - on separate SSDs. The problem occurs in both.

    All software/drivers (including both OS) are up to date.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2017
  10. power

    power Member

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    check the board and gpu for popped caps, make sure the gpu fan is spinning, maybe check voltages too.

    most likely candidate is gpu though.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    garrydfrench

    garrydfrench New Member

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    I don't know what a "popped cap" is.

    The fans both work fine and the temp registered in the AMD control centre is between 34-46.

    I don't know how to check voltages
     
  12. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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  13. Bold Eagle

    Bold Eagle Member

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    You have tried different outputs on the Video Card?

    You could also try adjusting the refresh rate of the monitor.

    Normally what your are seeing is either a failing cable or Graphics card.

    If you had some Thermal Interface Material (TIM) (from $5-10) you could consider stripping the card down, cleaning it up, reapplying TIM and see if that helps.



    He has a bit of a potty mouth and is a bit childish but it is a condensed video, don't touch that crud either like he does as I have heard it can be carcinogenic.
     
  14. voltare1

    voltare1 Member

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    If it was onboard I'd tell you your ram is faulty.
    Because it's a dedicated GPUs, either the card is dying (bad vram or GPU bonding failure ,) or its overheating.
    Or (maybe) your power supply is failing.
    Download ubcd and run a memory test, check bios hardware monitor for sagging voltages (<11.8 for 12v and <4.8 for 5v)
     
  15. FOTW

    FOTW Member

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    If those images are print screens then its not the HDMI cable, as its capturing what the Graphics card is putting out to the video out ports.

    Try running burn in test standard trial edition . Also try running other graphics benchmarks, uniengine or 3d mark and see if they cause this issue.

    From the looks of it its a dodgey graphics card, might be time to think of a upgrade, even a nvidia 1050 or AMD RX 460 will be a large increase in performance.
     
  16. OP
    OP
    garrydfrench

    garrydfrench New Member

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    Late this afternoon I bit the bullet and ordered a new graphics card.
    I ordered a 4GB MSI GTX 1050TI.

    I hope it fits straight into the PCI-E slot on my M/B. Usually I research parts to the nth degree before I buy them but this time I just picked one. I hope I haven't made a mistake.

    Thanks for all the comments. They were greatly appreciated.
     
  17. FOTW

    FOTW Member

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    Yeah shouldn't have any problems fitting that card, and it would be a improvement from your previous card.
     
  18. OP
    OP
    garrydfrench

    garrydfrench New Member

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    A final update.

    I fitted the new graphics card when it arrived, and all is well.
    Also, after removing the old card I noticed it was slightly bowed in the middle. I suspect it might have over heated at some stage.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2017
  19. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    I have this same bowing or sagging with the video card in my main rig, due to the weight of the cooler I suspect. It's a concern to me but I've read somewhere a while back it's not something to be worried about.
     
  20. zx_spectrum

    zx_spectrum Member

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