Aorus Thunder M7 Gaming MMO Mouse review thread

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by CXThunder, Jan 26, 2015.

  1. CXThunder

    CXThunder Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    31
    Hi All,

    This is the thread for those winners/selected testers from Aorus Thunder M7 Gaming Mouse community review competition, to post their reviews and feedback.

    Below is the list of winners/selected testers:-
    wild
    ominae
    fletfeather
    akromatic
    leighr

    Below is the review content you were agreed to included:-
    - Test the Mouse through your general activities for at least one week
    - Provide feedback in the form of a forum post, minimum of two paragraphs (We will make a thread in this forum section)
    - Provide a minimum of 4 images of the Mouse which support your review
    - Provide a list of pro's and con's of the mouse and rate it in a score out of 10


    For those interest this Mouse, visit here to see where to buy.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. wild

    wild Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2001
    Messages:
    1,551
    Location:
    Newcastle
    Since my journey with computers started in the early 90s, mice have come a long way. From ball mice, to early optical mice such as the humble Intellimouse Explorer, through to today's gaming optical and laser mice, there have been some major improvements. There are now quite a few mice that have been developed with a fairly specific purpose in mind. Most people know the major manufacturers, such as Microsoft, Logitech and Razer, but today we're going to look at Aorus. This is a subsidiary of Gigabyte specialising in laptops, keyboards and mice for the hardcore gaming market. Thanks to CXThunder from Gigabyte for kindly providing this review unit!


    Here we have their first gaming mouse in the Aorus line, the Thunder M7, as well as the Thunder P3 mouse pad. As the name and box suggest, it is targeted at MMO gamers. Features include 16 fully programmable buttons, an 8200dpi laser sensor and highly durable Omron switches. I'll touch on each of these features a bit more later on. One thing to note is that the box also shows "FPS" and "RTS" mouse types, suggesting that Aorus will be following up with more specialised mice in the future. For now, let's see what's in the box!


    After having bought far too many mice and other peripherals encased in a blister pack, it was very nice to see some effort put into the packaging for the Thunder M7 mouse. At the end of the day it's just packaging, but it does give a "wow" factor when you open the box. Not having to reach for a pair of scissors is a bonus! Included in the box (but not pictured here) is an envelope with a brief manual explaining a few of the software features, along with spare teflon pads which is a nice touch. Aorus see this as a mouse you'll keep for many years. A software disc is not included, but it is downloadable from the Aorus website.


    Moving along to the mouse itself, it's apparent that Aorus put a lot of thought into a design that is both attractive and functional. This is definitely an attention grabber! Although it initially looks like an ambidextrous design, it's probably not a good mouse for left handers. With the thumb indent on the left along with the protrusion on the right, and the general placement of the buttons, it's just not comfortable in the left hand.

    Along the left, we have extra buttons 1 through to 8 - these are not the true "mouse button" numbers that you'll assign in games, but I'll go into more detail on that in the software section. There's also the normal left and right mouse buttons, with the scroll wheel functioning as the middle button as standard for most mice. Below that is a sensitivity adjustment for the laser sensor. These two buttons can also be reassigned, but their location under the hand makes them a little tricky to use in games. On the right hand side is another button, which defaults to changing profiles in the software. There is also a window with a 3D "thunder" logo visible underneath.

    Now those of you paying attention might be asking the same question I did - that's not really 16 buttons, is it? Technically no. If you add up the 8 buttons on the left, 3 main mouse buttons, 2 sensitivity buttons and the mode button on the right, that's only 14. As it turns out, Aorus have counted the forward and backwards scroll as the last 2 buttons, as these can also be re-mapped to keys or macros.

    One thing that may turn some people off is the laser sensor. There's a bit of debate over whether or not a laser sensor is more laggy than a good optical mouse. This is very subjective and difficult to measure. Personally, I can't tell the difference in response between laser and optical mice, so this isn't really an issue for me. However, if you've had problems with laser mice in the past, it might be worth holding off to see what Aorus come up with in the FPS range in the future.

    As far as comfort of the design goes, my biggest complaint is the size of the mouse. My previous gaming mouse is the Razer Deathadder 2013, which I found to be extremely comfortable for long gaming sessions. The Aorus M7 is about the same width and height, but a fair bit shorter (approximately 1cm). If you have small to medium sized hands, you'll probably find the Aorus a good size, but with my slightly bigger than average hand it's probably a bit small. That said, I haven't managed to get any cramps after long gaming sessions so far. The only other thing to note here is that while Aorus have made all efforts to place the buttons within easy reach, it can be a little uncomfortable to select a few of them. Buttons 1 and 2 require you to move your index finger to the left. Buttons 3 and 4 need to be pressed from above with the side of the thumb. 5 and 8 also require a little stretching of the thumb, but 6 and 7 are pretty much right under where my thumb sits. This required a little bit of tweaking of button assignments in games to make the most frequently used actions the most comfortable to reach.

    One last point is build quality. The mouse is what I'd call about a medium weight, a little bit heavier than my old Razer. It doesn't have any additional weights, so if you prefer a very light or very heavy mouse, you're out of luck here. As far as the quality of the plastics go, most of the surfaces have a fairly premium feel to them, the only exception being the window on the right hand side where the last 2 fingers sit. Given the $85 price tag (as of January 2015 at PC Case Gear), I might have expected a little better, but overall it's not too bad.


    I won't spend much time on the mousepad, but as far as pads go, this one is quite nice. The surface is a fairly durable cloth material, with a stitched edge. A metallic Aorus logo sits in the top left. Underneath, we have a rubberised material that does an extremely good job of gripping to most surfaces. The size of the pad itself is quite large without being too big for my desk.


    One of the big features of the M7 is the lighting, which is as flashy as the design of the mouse itself. On the front are two "headlights", the brightness of which is adjustable in software. The only colour available for these is blue. In the middle, we have 4 lights to indicate sensitivity. Again, these are blue only. The mouse wheel and Aorus logo that lights up through the left hand window have another function. The button profiles in the software are distinguished by the colours blue, red, green, aqua and pink. As you press the profile button on the right, the mouse will cycle colours to indicate which profile is active. It's a handy feature if, for example, you have a separate macro profile for your FPS games.

    Software:
    On to the software, which is a big part of the Aorus features. As mentioned before, you can map all of the 16 buttons on 5 different profiles. There are 3 different types of mapping for each key. "Basic" includes a range of common functions such as mouse clicks, DPI adjustments, media controls, volume controls and general Windows tasks such as you'd find on a media keyboard. One interesting feature out of these is a DPI lock for FPS games. When you are sniping, you can press the DPI lock to change the sensor's DPI to a very low setting, ensuring you won't miss your target by bumping the mouse when firing.

    "Key mapping" is the second option for buttons, which is exactly what it sounds like - a mouse button is mapped to a keyboard key. This is the default mode in the first profile, which maps buttons 1-8 to keyboard buttons 1-8, which are most often used for spells and actions in MMOs. This makes sense given the mouse's target market.

    "Macro" is the third option, which lets you record a macro consisting of keystrokes, mouse clicks, repeats and delays to automate a task. This will be fairly familiar to anyone who has used a keyboard or mouse featuring macros before, such as Logitech's G-series.

    The last feature of the software is the settings tab, which allows you to manage profiles, clear or backup the mouse's onboard memory (which stores profiles and macros), change the brightness of the headlight, change the USB report rate for smoother response, and adjust wheel sensitivity. It also lets you change the steps of the 4 DPI settings from anywhere between 50 and 8200dpi on both the X and Y axes.

    Performance:
    I've run the mouse through a few various games and applications to get a good idea of the various strengths and weaknesses, starting off in general Windows usage such as web browsing and Photoshop. I found it to be nicely responsive, smooth and accurate, particularly for Photoshop work. I had no complaints at all here, and the ability to assign media buttons to the mouse is a big plus given that my keyboard doesn't have any media keys.

    Moving on to games, I'll start off with the Aorus' target market: MMOs. These days, my MMO of choice is Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, though the play style of most games in this genre are pretty similar. The classes I played with are the Bard and Black Mage (ranged and magic DPS), along with the White Mage (healer). I assigned the most frequently used skills to the side buttons, along with those I needed very fast access to. At first I found myself clumsily hunting for the buttons, as I was too used to the keyboard layout. I was consistently going back to the keyboard out of habit. It took a few hours of mentally forcing myself to use the side buttons on the mouse and get into the right cycle of skills. However, once I did, I
    discovered it is a much better way of playing - there's a lot less hand movement required, and I'm now finding the right skills faster every time. I'd struggle to go back to a keyboard now. It's well worth putting in the effort to switch to a mouse like this if you play many MMO games.

    The MMO results also applied to Torchlight 2. Although it's a RPG, skills work in a similar fashion, so the side buttons become fairly useful. I don't play Diablo, but I imagine the mouse would benefit Diablo players for the same reasons.

    I also tried it out with first person shooters, in this case Borderlands 2 and Titanfall. I found that in Borderlands I didn't really make use of the side buttons, probably because there aren't many keys used - pretty much just the Use key, Grenade and Class Skill. It's a game that doesn't really benefit from more buttons. I did find the mouse very accurate once again though, making sniping very easy. It also worked well in Titanfall, which can make use of the extra buttons a little better than Borderlands, due to having a few more skills/abilities. Like MMOs though, it takes a bit of time to get used to hunting for the buttons on the mouse rather than the keyboard.

    One thing I found consistently across all games and applications, which I've also found with other mice, is that I didn't use the DPI adjustment feature. The default setting of 1600 DPI felt pretty much spot on for everything I do. Any less felt too slow, and any more felt way too twitchy. However, that's just my experience. If you do like cranking your DPI when you play competitive FPS games, you'll probably find this feature more useful than I did.

    Conclusion:
    The Thunder M7 is a very solid first entry in the Aorus line of mice, and I can see it being my choice for quite a few years to come. If you're an MMO gamer and in the market for a new mouse, the M7 is well worth considering! Even if you don't play MMOs, there's no reason the buttons can't be adapted for use in any game, and there's plenty of features that make it a great mouse across the board. I'm looking forward to seeing what Aorus put out in the FPS and RTS options!

    Pros:
    - Stylish and eye catching design and packaging
    - Plenty of buttons and endless programming/macro options for any situation
    - Software provides lots of fine tuning of mouse functions
    - Accurate and responsive across a wide range of games and applications

    Cons:
    - A little on the small side, those with larger hands might find it uncomfortable
    - Some buttons can be a little difficult to reach, requiring careful consideration of macro/keymapping layout
    - Gamers who prefer the responsiveness of an optical sensor will be put off by the laser sensor in the M7

    Score: 8/10
     
  3. ominae

    ominae Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,098
    Bottom line: If you play MMOs, the Auros mouse will likely improve your performance by allowing you to more easily hit keybinds with your mouse hand and keyboard hand simultaneously. If you're a seasoned MMO player, the best example I can give is that the Auros allows me to hit more of my WOW character abilities (bound to the additional buttons on the Auros) while moving via WASD on the keyboard. I could do this before the Auros, but not as easily and not with the ability to hit such a high number of buttons/spells.

    Before I received the mouse (or entered the competition for that matter) I was already thinking of purchasing an MMO mouse as an option for improving my WOW performance. For those who play WOW:WOD one encounter I was thinking where a dedicated MMO mouse may be useful was for Imperator. The mechanics of this encounter require you to move your character often, and being able to case effectively while moving would certainly "min/max" my characters performance. Unfortunately with how I had my keys bound, serious finger dexterity was required to do this with my original keyboard and mouse setup.

    The Auros

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    My previous mouse, Razer Deathadder in the background.

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    Ergonomics

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    The Auros feels comfortable to me. Coming from my previous mouse, Razer Deathadder, it feels just as comfortable, maybe even slightly more so. Features that stand out in the ergonomics section include:
    - There is a slight extrusion on mouse button "6" (second button from the front in the row of four keys above the thumb rest area) that allows you to easily identify where your thumb is without looking (just like the physical marks on the “f” and “j” keys on a typical keyboard). This feature although seemingly small is a extremely helpful, particularly when I was still assigning my new mouse thumb mechanics to muscle memory.

    - The moulded rest for the third finger (right hand ring finger) is really nice and adds to the comfort of the mouse. My previous Deathadder did not have this feature.

    Buttons

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    The Auros has eight buttons additional to the left, right and middle buttons on a standard mouse. All button presses are solid and tactile, they feel great. The buttons are also placed in generally convenient and ‘easy’ to reach places (for my hand/finger size). The only button I have to adjust my hand grip to press is button number "5" which is the first most button in the row of four just above the thumb rest - it's not so much a 'stretch' to reach it, but more a twist of the wrist to move my thumb further forward to hit it properly.

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    Also importantly, I was able to start using the additional buttons on the Auros pretty much straight away without much learning/muscle memory and I think this is due to the simplicity of the Auros (only eight additional buttons) and how the buttons are arranged.

    Although this is the first and only dedicated MMO I’ve used I don’t think I could handle anymore buttons - eight seems "just enough" for me. In comparison, I think the Razer Naga (12-button version) would require significant practise before I could navigate and hit each button consistently.

    Construction

    The Auros is physically well built and feels like a quality item. The buttons are responsive and provide solid tactile feedback. There is no creaking or ‘give’ between the individual plastic panels of the mouse. The mouse surfaces have a matte feel to them, and overall the mouse never felt slippery in my hand - keep in mind I’m not much of a hand sweater, so your results may differ.

    Interesting note, there is a window into the internals of the mouse displaying the Omron key switches and a pulsing “Auros” text label. Superficial yes, but interesting.

    [​IMG]

    There are two additional buttons, "+" and "-" on the top of the mouse that allow you adjust the sensitivity of the mouse sensor on the fly. These buttons are low profile and even though it seems like that they would be accidentally pressed often given their prominent location, I never found this to be case in actual use. I don't think I accidentally clicked them at all during the last two weeks.

    Sensor

    There was some discussion in the original competition thread regarding the laser sensor and its application in a ‘gaming’ mouse. I haven’t played an FPS game on the PC for quite awhile, and I didn’t test the mouse in this situation where accuracy and responsiveness are important attributes.

    Over the past two weeks of using the mouse in WOW and desktop/OS applications the mouse sensor performed well. I feel I should mention that it did hiccup on me once in the desktop: The sensor seemed to bug out and my cursor movement didn’t seem to translate to physical mouse movement. The cursor just seemed limited to moving in one diagonal axis. Lifting the mouse up off the surface of the mouse pad and putting it back down seemed to resolve the issue. This issue only happened once during the two week period.

    Case

    I actually used the zip-up case the mouse ships in as a travel case for one of my interstate trips - though I'm not sure if this was the original design intent for the supplied case. The case itself is very solid and provides significant protection to the mouse. Much of the protection afforded is due to its large size and the amount of internal padding. As a result, the case is quite bulky and is not suitable for light travellers - I probably won't take the case with me on future trips.

    Software

    My main gaming machine at the moment is an Apple Macbook Pro running Mac OS X Yosemite. There is no OS X version of the Auros software available and OS X doesn’t natively support the features of the mouse. As a result, I had to utilise third-party software (USB Overdrive) to enable operation of the additional eight mouse buttons. I was also able to use ControllerMate (OS X application similar to AutoHotKey for Windows) to tweak and enhance mouse functionality for WOW.

    The only feature I did not trial was setting profile switching as this must only be available via the dedicated Auros software. Practically it wasn't much of a loss not having this feature as I don't place much priority on profile features and have never used it on any of my previous mice.

    Wrap-up

    Pros
    - Well built/high quality.
    - Great feel.
    - Great ergonomics.
    - Improved my WOW performance.

    Cons
    - Lack of native Mac OS X support however this was mitigated via available third-party software.
    - Laser sensor bugged out once.

    Final score: 9/10!


    Thanks again to CXThunder and Gigabyte for hosting the competition.

    Edit:

    Auros Mouse Pad

    I should also mention that CXThunder/Gigabyte were kind enough to issue competition winners with a free Auros mouse pad as well.

    I've used quite a few different mouse pads in the past, hard plastic, cloth-based, thin plastic (3M ones remember?!). The Auros mouse pad is a cloth type and it is a well-made item. Compared to my prior mouse pad (Blizzard Starcraft 2 cloth pad), it is better made, with the edges of the pad sewn-up (hemmed?) to prevent fraying. Also the Auros label is metal and is screwed into the mouse pad, fancy.

    The surface itself feels the same as my previous mouse pad so functionally, it's on par and offers no significant enhancements (are you surprised?) :p
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2015
  4. ominae

    ominae Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,098
    Hmm am I using OCAU Pix wrong? My thumbnails don't seem to be displaying....

    Edit:
    Ended up just using dropbox...
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2015
  5. akromatic

    akromatic Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Messages:
    475
    [​IMG]

    Aorus M7 is Aorus’s first mice and its first attempt to take on the MMO market and judging from the box I believe Aorus would be releasing mouses more specific to FPS and RTS genre. Thanks to CXThunder for kindly providing me a review sample.

    Specs according to the webpage:
    • 16 programmable buttons
    • 8200dpi laser sensor
    • 150ips/30g acceleration
    • 1000hz polling
    • ~110g
    • Omron switches rated 20million clicks

    Inside the box you get a box
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    That has another box
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    Then you get your prize
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    This is what is included in the pack
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    First Impression of the M7 feels serious and screams tournament and LAN starting from its moulded hard carry case that would seemed to protect the mouse from any possible handling damages aside from immersion in water, though it does seem repel spills as the case seemed to be made out of the same material the mouse pad is made out of which is claimed to be spill resistant. Really a Samsonite case for the mouse and the sort of protection I want for my mouse if I would go touring and attend tournaments or LAN with.

    The details do not end there, there is even a ferrite bead at the end of the mouse for electrical noise suppression, and how beneficial is that in the real world I do not know as the mouse has been faultless. My guess is that it just there to comply with some emission standards though typical USB2 cables are shielded well enough.

    This mouse feels like it is built to last with the included spare mouse feet and the use of Omron switches. Cable is nicely braided and the USB connector is gold plated and you get a Velcro strap for cable tidy or just to prep the mouse for transportation. The mouse itself feels really well built and solid with no creaks and the plastic used feels nice.

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    Further inspection I can’t help but to feel excited at the extra novelty Easter eggs Aorus has added on the mouse as it is the sort of extra details that you don’t often get with a mouse. As you look though the right window you would be greeted with “Thunder” and 4 sets of pipes coming from something that looks like an engine cover and on the other window you get the other bank of 4 pipes with a glowing “Aorus” written on the engine cover. You aren’t going to get a manlier mouse that has a V8 in it, homage to the Holden Thunder. Another feature of the said cover is to hide the PCB. Car references don’t just end there as the front of the mouse there is a pair of eyes/headlights.

    The shape of the mouse seems to fit quite a few grip style unlike Logitech where you have to palm, I can claw, finger and palm comfortably. The plastic side window feels really grippy and there is a deep thumb groove which really helps to prevent accidental button presses when gripping the mouse and helps a lot when lifting the mouse as your thumb is tucked beneath the row of buttons and this is one of the flaws the Razer Naga 2014 has as its almost impossible to lift without pressing the buttons because the mouse is too slippery, however with the ring finger rest area the side that intersects with the right clicker has a pretty sharp edge that is uncomfortable so it would be nice if it would be rounded on the future revisions. The M7 also has some vented slots on the back for those who have sweaty palms.

    [​IMG]

    Weight wise it is a comfortable weight, it’s not stupidly light and at the same time it’s not overly heavy like some wireless mouse *ahem* Naga Epic Chroma but you don’t get a customizable weight system. According to my kitchen scale it clocks in at 118g without the cord.

    There is 16 programmable buttons on this mouse but that is counting ever button on the mouse and that also means every button is programmable including the left and right click. So essentially after deducting two buttons for left and right clicker, one button for profile switching, one button for middle click, two buttons for forward and backward scrolling and two more for DPI if you want to keep the DPI switching function you are left with eight at your disposal so reality is there isn’t that many useable buttons left though granted you can remap them all as desired. Button layout requires a bit of learning curve to get used to the four-thumb button row but the buttons are shaped so you can tactile feel them out so it’s not quite as intuitive as the Saitek MMO7 but heaps better than the pre 2014 Razer Naga. The rest of the buttons are very reachable with the two buttons on the left clicker, two thumb buttons on the top of the four-thumb button row, two dpi switches on the back and a profile switcher button for the ring finger.

    Left and right clicks feels really nice with the use of Omron switches and I like the heavier feel of the switches as I often accidentally right click but I’d prefer the left click to be a bit lighter.
    As for the rest of the buttons the presses are very well defined and doesn’t feel membrane mushy and it feel more like the Naga 2014 sort of mechanical feel.

    No gaming mouse would be complete without some bling lights and there is quite lights that come with the mouse. There is four DPI indicator lights in blue and not adjustable in brightness and there is the headlights that are also blue that you can adjust in varying brightness except for off. Other lighting is the scroll wheel and the Aorus logo that changes colours according to the profile chosen and there is a range of preselected colours to choose from and you can get breathing effects to match with the K7 keyboard.

    One of the great features of this mouse is the on board memory which lets you use the mouse standalone without software or drivers, another great have for tournament or BYO peripherals because you can just plug and play and still have all your macros and settings with you on any system. It’s the sort of portability that Razer tries to sell you with synapse 2.0 but with Aorus there is no software or online sign in required.

    Before all that can happen though you still need to install the software once to program the mouse and the software does more than just macro programing, it lets you adjust the lighting, DPI profiles and most importantly profile switching rather than having to cycle though all the profiles to get the one you want by pressing the profile cycle button.

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    Settings tab lets you adjust the polling rate from 125hz to 1000hz (no idea why gamers even want a less then 500hz polling but hey the option is there), scroll amounts, DPI stages with individual XY axis settings for up to 4 steps in 50dpi increments, clear/backup/restore memory (another feature that the K7 missed out on), lighting settings for the headlights and profile lighting management that lets you disable profiles if desired.

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    There is a total of 70 macro memory slots shared across 5 profiles that you can select a variety preselected colours for, one of the features the K7 keyboard lacks though using the same software and RGB capable.

    Besides the macros there is key mapping feature to emulate keyboard presses and a number of preconfigured function that you can choose from like axis locking and even a mouse mat calibration option.

    [​IMG]

    Macro on the mouse offers the same features the K7 keyboard has and it’s a very power software when programmed properly especially with loop mode and mouse position recording.

    Could program something like a rapid 3 click burst per mouse click for FPS gaming.

    I haven’t been playing a lot of new MMOs lately as they all feel like a clone of WoW and I’m not a fan of it so I tend to fall back to old school Asian MMO for nostalgia so I’ve been testing the mouse on Rush on Seven Episodes a game by Triggersoft and Gravity. One of the nifty features of the macro is that it lets me pre-program and time my skills cycle exactly and loop them optimally which makes combat easy. Press a button and watch it unleash with perfection. Another use I found was when I multibox and have a healer auto loop buffs and heals. Also having frequently used keyboard buttons mapped to the mouse saves a lot of time and effort to hunt down said key, it feels a lot easier to thumb a button then the press one on the keyboard.

    Other stuff I play a lot with the mouse is DayZ, really handy to have Pg Up and Pg Down on the mouse along with Q and E. With Q and E on the mouse I can still lean left or right while strafing which offers a tactical advantage over keyboard because there is no way you can strafe left while holding Q.

    The beauty of having loop mode with this game is that it is such a running simulator that most of the time is spent holding W and now I can play hands free while my character runs across the map.

    Honestly though I find the macros far more useful outside of games as most games are designed for people with regular keyboards and mouse rather than specialized peripherals though do benefit greatly to a point its IMBA. Just having browser short cuts like close tab, reopen tab, new tab, back forward tab etc is heaven.

    Tracking on this mouse is great, I’m no elitist and I don’t care about the laser vs optical debate nor religiously a 400dpi guy and what matters is me hitting my targets and besides I’m a higher DPI guy who uses 1500-2000dpi for FPS games. Most of my mouse has a PTE sensor which IMO is rather horrible and inaccurate, this mouse I believe has an Avargo 9800 sensor and I instantly felt a huge difference in score improvements with CS:GO competitive. At the end of the day I get more kills less death and a smile on my face while being accuse for aim botting.

    Despite being advertised as an 8200dpi mouse it is not one that that I would recommend exceeding 4000dpi with nor should anyone with any mouse. It’s all nice and smooth till around 3200dpi and it starts to show signs of jitter, I’ll let the pictures to the talking.

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    The P3 mouse mat is a nice bonus that CXThunder provided and I happened to get mine in M size. Tracking is good on the mat and it doesn’t seemed to attract crap that often gets attached to my other mats. Edges are stitched to prevent fraying and the back is rubberised. One thing that caught my attention is the spill proof feature so I decided to put it to the test.

    [​IMG]

    As you can tell the Corsair mat just absorbs the water while the P3 displaces it.

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    A close up show how the water just forms a bead so I believe the mat has been treated with a hydrophobic coating pity the stitching isn’t coated with the same stuff as the stitching just absorbs the water when I lift the mat to let the water drip off. Good thing about having hydrophobic coating is that it stays clean so I can say good bye to the gunk that tends to accumulate on cloth pads.

    Speaking of mouse mats the carry case of the mouse feels like the same material so I put that to the test as well and surprisingly the case is also treated with hydrophobic coating but only on the top half so it’s a 50/50 chance of the mouse surviving a spill in a bag. Pity Aorus didn’t go the extra mile.

    [​IMG]

    Conclusion
    I find the Thunder M7 a very good all-rounder mouse despite being primarily advertised for MMO. Grip is great and tracking is good and it has a decent button layout though personally I like more buttons and for them to be more spread out, I really like how the buttons are placed on the Saitek MMO7 but too bad the sensor on that is junk. Having just 8 actually usable button is a bit limiting at times and the profile switching is a bit clunky nor is there any “shift” feature that MMO mice tend to have to increase the number of programmable buttons so you just get the 8 unless you sacrifice the DPI buttons etc and you have to go through the entire profile cycle. I’d love to see a wireless version in future. But so far this is pretty close to the Holy Grail in my books or at least more so then the other mice that I’ve used. Down side it does make you MMO so effectively that it becomes a routine of 1 click, wait and win. A bit more exciting with action MMO as you still need to move around to dodge hits but the greatest feature is letting you chain hits perfectly with a press of a button than to mistime the skills and mess up your skills rotation which means I can pay more attention to what’s happening on the screen than to eye the cool down / cast delays.

    As for the mouse mat it’s a typical cloth pad and not one of those more exotic aluminum or glass hybrid pad that are oh so silky smooth that controlling my mouse on them is hard though you do get a hydrophobic coating that none other cloth pad do and for that I’d definitely buy the P3 extended as a desk mat if I can find an Australian store that stocks it but as of now I can’t find anyone that does.

    Pros:
    It works without software or drivers, it just works.
    Highly portable with the carry case and cable tie
    Tracks well and accurate
    Suits a variety of grip
    It’s made to last with Omron switches and extra feet

    Cons:
    Software needs more work, some menu options are not clickable on a 1366x768 screen (ahem laptop)
    Buttons needs to be a bit more intuitive and tactile especially on the 4 thumb button cluster
    More buttons please?
    Sharp edge on the ring finger rest

    Score: 9/10
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  6. fleetfeather

    fleetfeather Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    Messages:
    572
    Location:
    2612
    This review is from the perspective of a PvP-orientated MMO gamer. Some of the stuff I would have covered is already covered above by Akromatic, so I'll try not to repeat too much of his/her work.

    Physical Aspects:

    The mouse itself is definitely on the smaller side compared to other mice I own and use. With dimensions of roughly 115x75x40mm, this mouse is certainly smaller than my main FPS mouse (the Zowie EC1 eVo) and my main MMO mouse (the Steelseires Wow Cataclysm). I clocked the weight at roughly 110g w/o cord and 156g w/ cord, but this is just using a set of digital kitchen scales. Compared to my other two main mice, the Thunder M7 is notably heavier in the hand, but perhaps not too heavy considering the way the thumb buttons are positioned (more on that later).

    The physical dimensions of the overall package are fairly problematic for me. I wouldn't say I have the largest hands in the world, but they are reasonably big. For me, this mouse is simply too small for MMO gaming; the pinky finger resting position is too thin for more than half my pinky to rest on it, and the overall dimensions are too small for me to comfortably relax my palm and fingers on the device. I like to palm grip for MMO gaming, because the prolonged nature of MMO sessions tend to cause my hands to relax over the mouse anyway. With the M7, I really struggle to find a nice palm grip; my fingers overextend over the main two buttons due to the shorter length of the mouse. This, combined with the overly-narrow pinky rest, make for a pretty uncomfortable experience...

    On to the thumb buttons.... Given that there is a fairly large indent for resting your thumb on the side of the mouse, the position of the 5th macro button confuses me; I have to actively adjust my grip on the mouse away from the thumb indent to reach it. Really, that 5th macro button is far too forward to be functional IMO; it's only 3-4mm away from the two macro buttons positioned next to the primary left click. Moving on to the macro button positions in general, I'm not sure if I really like the design choice of clumping the buttons above where the thumb naturally rests. Having a button-less thumb resting position certainly makes it easier to lift up the mouse, and also makes accidental button activations rare, yet this design choice is a direct departure from the tried-and-tested approach of having the thumb buttons directly in line with the thumb's natural resting position.... I'm not sure if this design decision will really appeal to the vast majority of MMO gamers.

    Sensor performance:

    The M7 mouse uses the Avago 9800 laser sensor, tuned to push 8200 DPI if you so desire. Avago 9800 sensors seem to appear in a lot of laser mice these days, and their performance is pretty well documented at this point. My jitter results were consistent with akromatic's above; 800 DPI is probably the least jittery experience. I also checked out the various polling rate accuracies, and nothing was out of the ordinary there either; 1000hz works quite well. As for acceleration issues, well, there was a reasonable amount of positive acceleration, which is common for the Avago 9800 sensor and shouldn't be a major concern for MMO gamers at least. Malfunction rate on the sensor is roughly around 7m/s, which is fine.

    With all that said, It'd be reallyyyy nice if peripheral manufacturers stopped using laser sensors in all MMO mice. I recognise that MMO gaming doesn't typically require pin-point precision (or at least, it shouldn't as long as you make smart choices in-game), but it would be nice if users actually had the option to grab a nice optical-sensor driven mouse to load up macros on. The argument can be made that MMO gaming can involve higher resolution, multi-monitor setups that require a high DPI that only a laser sensor can provide, but this situation is hardly the norm for the genre, and most mouse-snobs would likely prefer an optical solution if possible.

    One concerning issue I had with the sensor was that it seemed to have trouble tracking on my Artisan Hayate mousepad, with cursor stutter occurring when I smoothly moved the mouse across any axis..... This problem isn't common for this mouse sensor, so perhaps Gigabyte could do a bit of testing regarding this? The mouse tracked fine one the Thunder P3 mousepad we were provided.

    Software performance:

    Simply outstanding. The options for macros in the M7's software suite is rich and detailed. The option to record cursor movement is something I've long wanted for streamlining skill tree respec's in-game, and with a few clicks, I was able to get this working perfectly. I also really appreciate that the default loaded macros provided from the factory are set to number row buttons, making it easy to plug-and-play if you use some sort of default button mapping in-game.

    The software installation was also pretty uneventful, so that's nice. I had no issues regarding USB ports personally.



    Pictures to come once my phone charges up again!
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  7. leighr

    leighr Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2002
    Messages:
    561
    Location:
    Richmond, Melbourne
    This review is being conducted by both myself and my wife, so each section will include comments from both of us.

    Note: Thumbnail in Pix doesn't seem to be working at the moment, click the link for the full size image still works. I'm sure it'll be fine once Agg gets it all sorted post move.

    Packaging:

    Click to view full size!

    He says: Standard type packaging for a gaming peripheral. Wasn't expecting the additional hard zip case inside the box. Basic manual included, but software is online, so manual could just as easily be on the website as well. Additional non-stick pads included are a bonus, as I have worn through those on mice in the past.

    She says: Holy moly. Flashy neoprene hard case with a snug little cutout for the mouse. Are they expecting people to use it again once they've got it home from the store? Seems like overkill to me...

    Setup/Installation:
    He says: First off, plugged this into the mouse port on my Aten CS1784A KVM switch. Mouse powers on, but nothing more. Plugged it into the USB hub port of the KVM and after a while the driver downloads and the mouse starts working. Would be nice to see a more graceful failback to a more simple connection type if possible, by emulating a standard 3/5 button mouse. This isn't specific to the Aorus mouse, my existing Razer has the same issue. Also downloaded the Aorus Macro Engine software and installed that.

    She says: Hubby plugged it into the back of my machine (I could've done it, but he offered!), and then it took ages to download and install drivers (all automatic, so no harm done). Didn't install the extra software, just starting driving.

    Ergonomics:
    He says: I'm coming from the Razer Deathadder, which is a longer, lower profile mouse. My hand tends to sit a fair way back on the mouse, moving the mouse with a palm grip, rather than a finger grip. To me, the mouse felt too short, with my palm hanging off the end of the mouse, while at the same time being a bit too high off the desk for me to comfortably rest the heel of my palm on the desk surface.

    Click to view full size!


    She says: I normally use an old, crap, five-button Microsoft Intellimouse. It's a smidge longer and lower than the Thunder M7. I really liked the Thunder's hand position - the ring finger rest felt natural immediately and the thumb position too. My hand is smaller so the shorter profile felt good too. I definitely prefer it to the Deathadder, which is too long for my liking.

    Click to view full size!


    Use:
    He says: As far as tracking goes, the mouse seemed fairly accurate. I used it on the second level of sensitivity, which combined with my OS mouse settings results in a mouse speed that most people find a little too fast. But for me it felt about right.

    Standard desktop tasks, office, surfing the net, all feels ok. Tracking is fine, the default profile for web browsing with forwards and backwards buttons works ok. The buttons were easy enough to locate and activate with the thumb. Scroll wheel operates as a scroll wheel should.

    In gaming this mouse stands out a bit. In two of the games that I was playing with this mouse (Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel and Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor) I just used it as a standard mouse, didn't customise any of the bindings. I'm primarily a keyboard user, so tapping out keys with my left while I have use the mouse isn't a major issue for me.

    On the third game, Star Wars: The Old Republic, the mouse really began to show off it's features. Creating a couple of macros in the Macro Engine software, I was able to create a few opening combinations, designed for use with either a single opponent or multiple opponents. At one click of the mouse, I could jump across the screen and hack and slash an opponent to death with the lightsaber, or leap across the screen and stun a group of opponents. If I was a more hardcore player of these sort of games (high end WOW for instance) I imagine that I'd be spending even more time in there experimenting to get stuff firing as soon as it's off cooldown. I wonder if you could get it to the point of defeating an entire instance/zone with a single click?

    She says: Profiles! How cool are they? Green is my "general use" profile - web browsing, some basic graphics stuff and coding. All the extra buttons beyond the five standard ones are locked down, so I don't accidentally trigger something when I mash away without looking at my hand.

    I move about on the slowest setting, because I like the extra control when I'm doing per-pixel graphics stuff. This mouse is a lot more definite than my usual one - it selected, dragged and dropped exactly where I intended more often, and there was a lot less undo happening.

    When hubby and I fired up Borderlands: The Presequel, I switched to a purple profile and mapped the additional buttons to gun slot selection. Handy! I love that I can wield Boganella with one button click rather than spinning through the scroll wheel. Speaking of the scroll wheel, thumbs up for the Thunder's definitive action - my old mouse would occasionally stick between notches and have two guns switching in my hand.

    Overall:

    Click to view full size!

    He says: Back to the Deathadder for me. It's not that the mouse was bad in the way it performed, it just doesn't match up to the shape of my hand and how I like to hold the mouse. It does what it says on the box, the macro system seemed quite easy to use, but it's not quite the mouse for me. Score 7/10.

    She says: I've liked using the Thunder so if it's there for the taking, I'll take it. The comfortable hand position, the superior scroll wheel, the ability to program the additional buttons and whip out a gun of choice at will, the better performance at fine work all add up to a compelling argument to retire the ol' Intellimouse. Admittedly I'm coming off a low base but hey, it works for me. I know I haven't exercised its full potential yet but I look forward to setting up some funky combos and giving it a proper workout. Score 9/10.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2015
  8. OP
    OP
    CXThunder

    CXThunder Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    31
    Thanks for all the current review. Do appreciate all of your's hardwork to get this review done, and I am looking forward to have more of these event coming. Please stay tune!!

    For those, who are interest to purchase after reading this, please refer to below link:-

    Mouse: Aorus Thunder M7

    Mouse pad: Aorus Thunder P3

    If you have any questions regarding on Gigabyte / Aorus Peripheral, please feel free to PM me or reply on the thread! Cheers
     
  9. akromatic

    akromatic Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Messages:
    475

    Just wondering where can i get the P3 extended, everywhere else does the M size
     
  10. OP
    OP
    CXThunder

    CXThunder Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    31
    So far, only M size available in AU. But, we are working to get the XL in asap. looking forward to be arrive by mid-March.
     

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