Are there any cameras with smart capabilities?

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by Amfibius, Feb 2, 2019.

  1. Amfibius

    Amfibius Member

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    I have just returned from a holiday in Europe where I travelled with my "real" camera and my Huawei Mate 20 Pro. I was amazed by the photos the Huawei consistently turned out. In short, it looks at what photo you are trying to take and it responds accordingly. If there is a person in the photo, it defaults to "portrait mode" where it automatically blurs the background. If it detects a wide dynamic range, it changes to auto HDR. If it sees food, it changes to macro mode.

    Of course, the photos don't hold up if you zoom to 100% and pixel peep. But compare these photos, straight from the camera:

    L1008023.jpg

    This photo was taken with a Leica M10 with a 35mm f/1.4 lens.

    IMG_20190106_154708.jpg

    And this was shot with the Huawei. The camera phone detected that there was a wide dynamic range. When I hit the shutter button, I got the message - "sharpening the photo, hold your camera steady". In other words, it takes a few photos and then combines them to get the HDR.

    I am pretty sure I could coax more details from the Leica RAW file with Lightroom, but with any "real" camera you are still limited by shutter speed. The cameras don't automatically shoot a few frames and then combine them.

    I would be pretty excited if SOMEONE brought out a camera that had the smarts to do this!
     
  2. sandwichamwin

    sandwichamwin Member

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    You're comparing a camera which was designed for a niche group of photography purists who want total control over their photos and a classic rangefinder shooting experience vs the extreme convenience for consumers who just want a photo.

    I'm sure most modern cameras will auto bracket images and do HDR if you tell it to. Admittedly I have no used a consumer P&S for some time but I would be surprised if they didn't do this kind of thing on auto mode, same goes with the lower end DSLR's.
     
  3. luke o

    luke o Member

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    Horses for courses as said above. That said the new mirrorless cameras do quite a bit in camera that previous gen didn't. The Nikon Z6/Z7 for example automatically does lens corrections as you shoot so you don't have to do them with applications like lightroom when shooting wide angle stuff.

    Pretty sure a lot of the Fuji's and Sony's on auto mode would also use auto-iso and capture the most light they can for shots like your smartphone. I don't know of any that would turn on auto-bracketing and do HDR on the camera itself.
     
  4. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    Some newer Canon DSLRs (at least the 6DII) do in-camera HDR. It doesn't auto-detect and switch on HDR, but it's easy to enable. It, along with heaps of cameras with liveview or EVF also have extra smarts in those modes, including excellent AF capabilities.

    Essentially it needs to either be a mirrorless body or using liveview to have those kind of smart features so that they have all of that data from the sensor available to them.
     
  5. HorrorLand

    HorrorLand Member

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    Olympus I probably your best bet for this kind of stuff. Although I'm surprised as to why you are using a leica then? Jewelery? :p
     
  6. Aushiker

    Aushiker Member

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    Timely post. Making a decision this weekend between a Huawei Mate 20 Pro and a Google Pixel 3. You may have swung me to the Mate 20 Pro even though I still prefer to use my cameras, having these sort of features on hand in the phone is handy.
     
  7. Michael H

    Michael H Member

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    Sony has this type of tech (partly) in the there point and shoot range, esp Gold Button Auto. Increasing you will hear of AI or computational photography (the marketing terms) in mirrorless cameras like the new Olympus, Fuji XT3 and the Panasonic S1. Others will shortly follow.

    Currently Panasonic and Olympus has a lot of smart tech in there existing MFT cameras.
     
  8. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    For those who don't want to go Huawei for whatever reason, the LGs are also worth looking at. I'm loving mine, with an ultra-wide angle lens in particular. Not the low-light performance of some others, so it depends on what you're looking for.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Amfibius

    Amfibius Member

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    Yeah, I knew there would be some anti-Leica sentiment here which was why I was contemplating keeping quiet about which camera it was. I shoot Leica because it's full frame, compact, and has superb lenses. Also - I learnt how to shoot with an Olympus 35RC rangefinder and I still shoot with full manual exposure controls even when I had a DSLR. With the Leica, the only thing I was really giving up was the AF, and I didn't mind doing that to save a few kg from my backpack.

    Having said that, I have been eyeing the MFT system for quite a while because it is even more compact. However I am not ready to give up full frame just yet. If they have this kind of tech, it might be time to buy one of those cameras to try out.
     
  10. HorrorLand

    HorrorLand Member

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    Not so much anti-leica - also use M mount and had an m6 but just didn't get on with it, I prefer bessas/cosina. If I were to get any digital m now it would be an $$$m10 monochrom$$$, perhaps upgrade to a film leica or check out panasonic S1? :p
     
  11. lonewolf1983

    lonewolf1983 Member

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    plenty of cameras have scene recogntion, mostly mirrorless as they can get the full idea of what to look for
    Sony's A-mount cameras have done the multi-frame noise reduction for 5+ years, could work if things were still enough.

    Machine learning and multi-frame stacking etc are easier in phones due to the smaller sensor size, but the tech will filter up pretty quick
     
  12. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    How does the smaller sensor size help?

    I expect the processor power has a lot to do with it - there is some serious grunt in mobile phones these days, and they aren't lacking the sort of hardware to churn through multimedia either.
     
  13. lonewolf1983

    lonewolf1983 Member

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    Less sensor area will generally mean less rolling shutter, and often less pixels (depending on camera of course) so easier to process.
     
  14. Dark Orange

    Dark Orange Member

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    Wouldn't rolling shutter area be defined by resolution rather than sensor size?

    As for the OP, I assume a modern phone has a lot more processor power than even the high end cameras, which would make analysing the live view much easier. And as for the two features you mentioned, the fake aperture blur used by phone cameras is horrible, and is less of a necessity on cameras with larger sensors. And my Sony A7Riii will do auto-HDR, 3 image bracket of between 1EV and 6EV difference taken at 10fps.
     
  15. luke o

    luke o Member

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    I think we'll see more and more smarts in DSLR/Mirrorless cameras. Take Sony/Fuji and others with there eye detect autofocus, you can select the left or right eyes and the 'AI' tracks that for you on your subject automatically.. they can spin in circles and it still works.
     
  16. mtma

    mtma Member

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    There's no doubt that the smarts in cameras will improve, but the factor that the smartphone will usually have more processing power and connectivity available to it to perform smarts compared with a prosumer camera isn't going to change much in the future.

    A hypothetical smart-phone system could use location and image data from a server that has a database of high resolution information about famous locations to reconstruct detail that the user didn't actually capture, for example. There's a few factors in play that mean that you're not about to replicate this readily in a standalone camera as we know it today.
     
  17. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    Smarts are one thing, mixing that with usability will be very tricky. i.e. how do I switch between eye-detect and point on the fly, how do I tell it to follow an eye vs use the closest eye?

    It's always the challenge with intelligent/smart/predictive versus maintaining control, particularly with pro and prosumer gear and software.
     
  18. Xang

    Xang Member

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    I know this was just a random example, but Sony does this now - one button for each. From March onwards, it will be one-button/integrated.
     
  19. lonewolf1983

    lonewolf1983 Member

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    yeah thats a pretty common thing for custom buttons
    Fuji allows you to toggle via a custom button
    Nikon (D850 and D5 at least) allow you to set a button to override your current AF mode and select another - really useful
     

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