Australian Computer Museum Society Fundraiser

Discussion in 'Retro & Arcade' started by Dellwood, Oct 13, 2020.

  1. Flamin Joe

    Flamin Joe Member

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    I don't have much of a problem with Facebook as with my parents still in Adelaide and having extended family overseas who I never see, it's a great way to keep in touch with them.

    On the retro side I love it. The majority of the groups I've joined are retro so everyday my feed is filled with various retro hardware/software that people have found or are working on. Not only do you see things like that on there but you also hear pretty quickly about the latest retro projects people have started and can get involved on. I love the little retro community we have going on here but to be honest you just don't see the same level of content you do all on one spot on Facebook.

    Then there is also the fact that Facebook allows you to get in touch with some the icons of computing/gaming history. A few name drops here but in a couple of the groups I'm in we have Ken Williams (of Sierra fame), John Romero (ID Software) who as it turns out he and his wife are big PC Big Box collector nerds like me, Denis Loubert (he did a lot of the artwork on the Ultima series) plus there are various other develepers the names which escape me right now who you can interact with. Where else can you do that?

    I get why people don't like Facebook but at the same time I think your starving yourself from the good things that can come from it.
     
  2. okclock123

    okclock123 Member

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    Oct 27, 2016
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    Location:
    Sydney
    I dont get computer and video game museums. What for? To just look at plastic boxes for a minute or two? There are a bunch if pcs on display in powerhouse museum (behind the glass obviously), kids walk past them straight to where games on touchscreens are.

    Lectures, master classess, (retro?) electronics and software workshops, and competitions is where its at in my opinion. And you don’t really need old hardware to know how these things worked. Videos of disassembly with some entertaining voiceovers would be enough imo to know what you need to know about old computers. Of course you need old computers to make the videos but no one is discussing this side of things, its always about displaying boxes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020

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