BBQ Chicken

Discussion in 'Geek Recipes' started by tunagirll, Jan 30, 2010.

  1. tunagirll

    tunagirll Member

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    You'll need a BBQ with a lid and thermometer to do this one.

    1 #20 free range chicken

    The brine:
    1 1/2 litres tap water
    1/2 cup cooking salt
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    Tablespoon black pepper
    1/2 packet pickling spices (optional)
    Couple of chopped up garlic cloves.

    The stuffing:
    1 x lemon
    1 x small-med brown onion
    6-10 garlic cloves roughly chopped

    The rub:
    Vegeta vegetable stock powder
    Olive oil

    You'll need a bowl big enough to hold both the chicken and brine so the chook is completely submerged - this is important.

    Pour all brine ingredients into a bowl and stir until dissolved. Solution need to be cool so don't use hot water, or if you did (you idiot) stick it in the fridge until it's cold.

    Add chicken and submerge it, normally it tries to float so keep it down with a pot or whatever. Refrigerate for 5 hours.

    After 5 hours take it out and rinse it off thoroughly. Sit it in the bowl so that it can air dry. Leave chook in the fridge uncovered for 12 hours or overnight to ensure the skin is totally dry. If the skin isn't dry, it won't brown properly.

    When you are ready to BBQ, put the chook on a biscuit rack in a roasting tray. Stuff it with wedges of onion, lemon and the garlic. Skewer the cavity shut, pin the wings and if you want to, skewer the legs together. Rub the bird all over with Vegeta stock powder (go easy, the brine has salted the bird all the way through. You're just adding a little extra flavour for the skin) and olive oil. Place breast down on the tray.

    Preheat BBQ to 180-200 degrees, using the burners on the side. Leave the middle ones off as you are going to roast the bird not fry it.

    Put the tray with chook on the BBQ in the middle and cook at 180-200 for 30 minutes. Drop temp to 140-180 and cook another 30 minutes.

    Turn bird over so it is breast side up and continue to cook for another 30 minutes or until done. If you're doing a big BBQ with sausages, steak etc this would be about the time to be getting ready to throw these onto the barbie as well to have it all finish together.

    If you're doing it right, it should look like this:

    [​IMG]

    Brined chicken cooks a little faster than normal, and you need to take care not to overcook it or it will get a little mushy. Cook it until it's just done and you will be serving up a very yummy and moist BBQ chook :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2010
  2. death

    death Member

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    Looks great, thanks for posting :D
     
  3. scon

    scon Member

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    Pic looks amazing! One thing i do to my lemons when putting them inside the cavity of a chicken is put them on a bench and roll them, while pressing down hard on it, to break all the juice out the little pulpy bits inside, then I get a fork and stab the lemon all around, so it's got like 30 little holes in it, then i shove it up it's clacker and sew him up. I think of it like a little tear gas canister inside spraying lemon juice all through the skin.

    * I know it's not actually boiling in the lemon, but that's how I like to think of it.
     
  4. OP
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    tunagirll

    tunagirll Member

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    Sounds like Advanced Lemon Techniques 201 lol
    Honestly I just don't have time to get fancy, I just chop and shove, although I am tempted by your version of lemon armageddon. :Pirate:
     
  5. jamieyn

    jamieyn Member

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    That looks great :thumbup: I've always wanted to brine a chicken to roast - this may just inspire me to do it this weekend!
     
  6. pher0x

    pher0x Member

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    I am completely mesmerized by the deliciousness of that chicken.
     
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    tunagirll

    tunagirll Member

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    I wish I had taken a photo of the BBQ rump steak I made on the weekend, possibly even more delicious looking than the chicken (and tasted pretty good too).

    Back OT though this is a really nice chook that will impress your guests. All the work is in the preparation, once it's time to BBQ you only need to put it on the plate. It's even better if you are all relaxing outside near the BBQ so they can see it cooking for dinner :)
     
  8. Amfibius

    Amfibius Member

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    tunagrrl I love your recipe! You are so right, the secret to a good roast chicken is all in the preparation. Brine it properly, then leave it to dry to crisp up the skin. The brining process actually changes the molecular structure of the meat and makes it more tender.

    These simple steps give you the most unbelievably moist and tender chicken which is superior to any commercially bought roast chicken. IMO Red Rooster tastes dry and over-salty by comparison.

    One more thing to add - the quality of the chicken is important. Avoid self-basting chickens, because these chickens have been injected with salt water so they are heavier than normal chickens. There is therefore no need to brine these chickens, but I have found the results are better if I brine them myself.

    A good free range chicken is usually the best chicken to use. These chickens can be tough because the chickens get more exercise, but the meat is usually more flavourful. The brining process tenderizes the chicken so that it is delicious. A free range chicken which is roasted "normally" would usually be tough.

    BTW - you remove your chicken when it is 85C? I remove mine when it hits 65C!!! The temperature will rise to a max of 68C and then start to cool. When I carve the chicken, the thighs and breasts are "just" cooked. I know that most meat thermometers indicate indicate 80-85C as the "cooked" temperature for chicken, but this temp is too high IMO.

    There is no harm if your roast chicken is undercooked. Just return it to the oven and you can save your dinner. OTOH an overcooked chicken is ruined.
     
  9. OP
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    tunagirll

    tunagirll Member

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    To be honest Amfibius I don't use a meat thermometer, I just take it out when it's cooked, but it's hard to put down on paper when that is, exactly. 65 might be a better benchmark? I know 80 is when any possible bugs are murdered but the meat is a bit dry, I had to make it that way for my preggo sister.

    I always use a free range chicken, I like my chicken to taste like chicken and more importantly I like my chicken to have had some kind of reasonable life before meeting the axe. When we get the chook pen redone, I'm investing in some Barnevelders as there is a local place that you can take the chooks too and for a small sum they will dress them for you ^.^

    I've never heard of a self basting chicken. Gives me an image of a chook sitting in a pan with a spoon, singing bathroom style while basting itself lol.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2010
  10. empacitator

    empacitator Member

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    Looks great Sil let us know when to come over for the next bbq ;)
     
  11. Amfibius

    Amfibius Member

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    Tunagrrl any meat should be safe to eat if the cooking temperature exceeds 50C and is held for >10 minutes. Also, with intact meats - all the bugs are on the surface. For a chicken, this means the skin and the internal cavity. Not the same for minced or chopped meats where the bugs are spread evenly throughout the meat. This means that if you like, you can cook your chicken to medium rare and it would be safe to eat - which is in fact how some Chinese and Japanese cooks do it. Hainanese chicken rice has a trace of pink and the bone marrow is still red when it is broken.

    Never seen a self-basting chicken? My local Safeway has them.
     
  12. dahurldog

    dahurldog Member

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    ah shit

    i was stupid and bought a chicken and put the chicken in the brine about 4 hours ago and that was all i read up to in the instructions. i just read about leaving it for 12 hours to dry out....

    i might just take it out now and leave it to dry for a few hours at least and then cook the sucker

    regardless, im sure it will taste better than if i just roasted straight away
     
  13. sormuijai

    sormuijai Member

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    You can leave it uncovered in the fridge to let it dry out quicker. Or seriously just stick it infront of a fan! Thats how you achieve the really crispy skin on crispy skin chicken or peking duck.
     
  14. OP
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    tunagirll

    tunagirll Member

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    Yep I leave it to dry out in the fridge overnight or if you are meant to do it tonight maybe try that fan suggested. The skin needs to dry out or it won't be crispy at all!
     
  15. Sciflyer

    Sciflyer Member

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    i can vouch for the tastiness of the above chicken - not having done it before i was surprised how well it turned out :weirdo:

    Anyone with a lidded BBQ should give this a go!
     
  16. qwertylesh

    qwertylesh Member

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    it looks awesome, i would really love to try this, the only thing I need now is a chicken, a bbq, and patience :upset:
     
  17. lionman

    lionman Member

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    My BBQ doesn't have a hood :(

    I assume the same recipe would still be pretty good in a conventional oven too though? Sounds pretty tasty, chicken is my favourite!
     
  18. BuD

    BuD Member

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    this looks cool will give it a go minus the sugar :)
     
  19. Willybomb

    Willybomb Member

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    Will this work on any BBQ that has a hood (and thermostat attached)? I once roasted a chicken in an electric frypan years ago...
     
  20. OP
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    tunagirll

    tunagirll Member

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    You'll need the sugar :o it's part of the brining process

    Yep would work just fine in an oven. We just don't have an oven that works.
     

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