BBQ Pork

Discussion in 'Geek Recipes' started by sormuijai, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. sormuijai

    sormuijai Member

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    So I'm fed up going to all the chinese restaurants and looking at their overly dyed up red BBQ pork. So red that it stains the rice and everything else touching it. So I finally got off my butt and made my own BBQ Pork. The marinade is super simple. The quantities will depend on how much meat you have, what bowl you use (So it'll cover properly) etc.

    Marinade:
    1kg pork neck cut into strips
    Lots of chinese BBQ Sauce - 1/2 cup BBQ sauce or 1/4 cup Hoisin (as its a much stronger)
    Sherry or other alcohol - 1/4 cup? (Just enough to loosen the bbq sauce)
    Five spice powder - shietloads! 1 heaped tablespoon
    1 tsp salt
    10 tsp sugar (Or substitute with honey)
    1/2 bulb of garlic

    Basically you need enough marinade to cover all the meat.

    TIP: I always make my marinade first so I can taste test it and made adjustments before adding the raw meat. (Of course, I know lots of people who taste the marinade that has raw meat sitting in it...)

    Marinate overnight (I had mines marinating for 24hrs :D )

    Bake on a rack and using a tray to catch all the drippings. Approx 180 for 45mins. Baste with the marinade throughout the whole process. 10mins before its cooked, baste with honey and crank up the temperature. Once its nice and golden with little burnt black bits on the corner, then its all good to go!

    Serve on a plate of steaming hot rice and boiled veggies. Drizzle with soya sauce or the marinade/drippings (Which you boil of course!)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2008
  2. Gouki

    Gouki Member

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    Damn! I'm drooling! Looks nice :thumbup:
     
  3. Sifaga

    Sifaga Member

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    yumyumyumyum
     
  4. afrokiller

    afrokiller Member

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    Looks very tender and delicious. That long marinading period really seems to have given it some juiciness. :thumbup:
     
  5. Pablo_H

    Pablo_H Member

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    Sounds nice, I've got almost full jars of hoisin and 5 spice so I might try it.
    But do you seriously boil your veges and rice? I though steaming would be better? And more veges rather than rice too.
     
  6. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    Absolutely nothing better than honey marinaded Pork. I aboslutely love it!
     
  7. scon

    scon Member

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    Oooh, yummeh, I love this stuff. I used to eat tons of the stuff when I was down in Sydney. Haven't found much good stuff up here in Brissie.
     
  8. Andrew357

    Andrew357 Member

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    Looks great, however i think the red BBQ pork is what is commonly known as Char Siu http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Char_siu.

    That being said, your recipe probably has more flavour than a Char siu one.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    sormuijai

    sormuijai Member

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    BBQ Pork = Char Siu = Red BBQ Pork

    The only diff between what I made and what you can buy is that I didn't put shietloads of red colouring :sick: Which is really common. When we used to make BBQ pork to sell in the restaurant, we put red colouring as well, just not as much as you would get now days. But just enough for it to look pretty for the customers. It really irks me to buy bbq pork and its stains the rice almost red/orange from all the colouring they use. For cooking at home, I won't put any colouring except for what comes in the sauce.

    Pablo_H: If you're using HoiSin, I might go a bit easier on the quanitities of sauce as I find hoisin much richer than the Chinese BBQ sauce I buy. But it could be the brand. I've updated the recipe.

    As for boiling vs steaming, we always always boil our veggies. I find that it tastes much sweeter than just steaming it. It also only takes us 1min max to boil. Chuck the veggies in, and as soon as the veggies start changing colour to that bright green we take it out straight away. Plus, the veggie water we sometimes use to make stock or even just drink it like that as a broth.

    As for the rice, its always boiled, although some restaurants call it steamed rice. (They mostly use huge rice cookers now days). Oh, and I had another bowl of veggies on the side to go with everything :lol:
     
  10. elusiveone

    elusiveone New Member

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    Damn that looks GOOD. I've just bought a pork roast (first ever), can I do this?
     
  11. OP
    OP
    sormuijai

    sormuijai Member

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    hmm not sure about pork roast? Does it have skin on it? If it does, you're better off making roast pork I think? (Why waste all that crackling? :D )

    Roast pork is similar where you marinate JUST the meat with salt, pepper, 5 spice powder and some chopped garlic if you want. We leave the whole piece of pork sitting in a tray of marinade in the fridge uncovered. It dries the skin out and makes a much better crackling. Then roast as you normally would.

    But otherwise, most cuts of pork would work, but the most tender part would be the pork neck. Its also the most commonly used for BBQ Pork. Makes it extra juicy :D
     
  12. infernooo

    infernooo Member

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    What brands of chinese bbq sauce and hoisin sauce do you usually use? could you include a photo of the bottles please?

    Thanks!
     
  13. vec

    vec (Taking a Break)

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    this sucker looks like it belongs in the recipe subforum, great work there sormuijai!
     
  14. Amfibius

    Amfibius Member

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    Looks great, sormuijai ... thanks for the recipe! Will give this a go soon. Do you buy your meat from a Chinese butcher, or are the cuts available from Coles/Safeway?

    Yeah, that is "siu yok" (roast pork). The red one is "char siu". I prefer to call them by their Chinese names, much less confusing.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    sormuijai

    sormuijai Member

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    This is the sauce we use:

    [​IMG]

    Amfibius: I grabbed the meat from a Chinese butcher as they're usually cheaper ($6-8/kg). We've bought pork neck from coles before when they were on sale and it turned out really nice as well. But i find the meat fresher at the chinese butchers.

    As for the name, I call it by its chinese name, but I write its english name since the chinese spelling is always different! hehe
     
  16. water_ling

    water_ling Member

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    Good homecooked char siew. If you were selling this, I would buy it from you!

    btw: One of the ingredients confuses me, what is spice powder?
     
  17. Amfibius

    Amfibius Member

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    water ling - wikipedia 5 spice powder.

    You can buy it from the bottled spice section in your supermarket or an Asian grocery store. Ask for "Ng Heong Fun" (its Chinese name) but most of them will understand if you ask for 5 spice powder.
     
  18. OP
    OP
    sormuijai

    sormuijai Member

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    Thanks water_ling!
    I've change the recipe to read "Five spice powder" so avoid confusion :D

    The five spice powder can be found in any asian grocery store and usually comes in a plastic sachet. It looks a bit brown like cinnamon.
     
  19. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    Wiki has the recipe as this:

    1 kg pork shoulder.
    2 tbsp. dark soy sauce
    2 tbsp. light soy sauce
    2 tbsp. oyster sauce
    2 tbsp. Shaoxing rice wine
    2 tbsp. clear honey
    4 tbsp. hoisin sauce
    ½ tsp. five spice

    Slice the meat into strips about 1 inch wide by 6 inches long. A long thin strip like this will keep its shape better when hanging.
    pierce the pork all over thoroughly with a fork. This make the pork more tender and allows the marinade to penetrate the meat to give flavour all the way through.
    Mix all other ingredients together.
    Place pork strips in a tray and cover with marinade. Ensure strips are covered completely in marinade.
    Cover tightly with cling film and place in the refrigerator for several hours. Overnight or for 24 hours is preferable.
    Preheat the oven to 230°C and place a pan in the bottom to catch drippings. Line this pan with aluminium foil to make cleaning easier.
    Hang the meat on hooks in the oven or lay them on a rack. Depending on the method and the size of your oven, it may be easiest to do this in two or three batches, rather than all at once.
    Roast for 20 minutes, until pork is cooked all the way through. Baste at least twice to build up a good layer of marinade on the outside of the meat. The pork should turn a golden-red colour as it cooks.
    Allow to cool while still hanging, or lay on wire rack to cool. Avoid laying on top of other meat or on a flat surface until cooled.
    Cover and refrigerate until needed.
     
  20. SyN

    SyN Member

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    nice one sor mui jai

    looks very like cha charn ting, with a little choi sum (?) too
     

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