Best language to start learning?

Discussion in 'Programming & Software Development' started by L4ncer, Feb 22, 2011.

  1. L4ncer

    L4ncer Member

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    Hey guys,

    As the title suggests, I'm looking to learn a programming language.

    Having said that... I have done a little bit of C at TAFE as a subject in the course I was doing. I've also done a bit of VB but not interested in that.

    I have thought about C++ as it's similar to C in some ways... or should I continue down the road of C due to having some exposure to it?

    I've heard about delphi and downloaded a borland version (I think) but didn't work in windows 7.

    So yeah... as you can see not quite sure what to do. I'm not looking at using the language for anything in particular, just want something interesting to learn due to boredom factor after work each day :lol:
     
  2. Dopefish

    Dopefish Member

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    FORTRAN is probably the best.
     
  3. -Ace-

    -Ace- (Banned or Deleted)

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    There are many schools of thought about which language to learn first, some will recommend a simple language like Python/Perl so you are able to rapidly learn structure and flow concepts. There are others who believe that you should learn a language like C/C++/Java as it promotes good programming practice.

    Personally, i am learning C...
     
  4. SaTaN

    SaTaN Member

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    C# if you're on windows. really does depend on what you want to actually accomplish. (or python)
     
  5. Lukenet

    Lukenet Member

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    Just start with Assembler :D If you can learn that, you will be massively ahead of most so called programmers.

    Learn the physics of code, as well as theoretical concepts. If you fundamentally know why you are doing something, you always write better code.

    KISS = Keep It Super Simple <- Live by this rule.
    Be a Lazy Programmer <- learn to write code that can be reused time and time again.
    Also remember that Languages come and go. Good techniques remain for life. (Don't get attached to language, they all become old one day)
    Learn to read and search a Language's API. All the answers and power are hidden in there, some where.. It will save your arse and your face with your boss one day if you can find the answers by yourself.

    It really is as simple as on/off or 0/1 and how to allocate and sequence these states using the most efficient method, that is the key.
     
  6. stmok

    stmok Member

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    I'm currently self-learning Ada.

    Compared to C or C++, its like a dictatorship. The compiler has all these checks to ensure you don't do something stupid. This is because the language is mainly used and is popular for mission critical roles. (eg: Flight control system for Boeing 777, guidance system for rockets, air traffic control, etc.) ... Overall, it promotes good engineering. Upon initial learning, its like taking old school cough medicine. It tastes like $hit in the short term, but you come to realise the benefits of using it in the long term.

    Lukenet does have a point that programming isn't just about the language. I've once talked to an experienced Russian programmer in regards to why they rank high in the world or have a reputation for hacking. Its mainly because they have strong fundamentals. (Maths, hardware, algorithms, design, etc).

    An important thing about being familiar with multiple languages is; one shouldn't presume functions in one language will behave the same way in another. :Paranoid: This often saves a bit of heartache during debugging/testing. :lol:
     
  7. chip

    chip Member

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  8. Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    C will just make you want to kill yourself
    C++ is good cause you learn all the horrible stuff like memory management and pointers with some niceties like strings and OO but it still makes you want to kill yourself

    I recommend Java and C# due to being incredibly easy to do just about anything in them in a very short amount of time and have it not crash. However there are definitely good reasons to learn languages like C and C++ as they teach you the fundamentals and what goes on underneath, with java and C# its all just magic.

    As said above doesn't really matter what you learn, programming is programming and once you are good at it you can pick up the basics of any language in a day or two.

    looks very interesting, does it have a wide range of compilers?
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2011
  9. tr3nton

    tr3nton Member

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    What are you wanting to develop? First step is probably deciding on something to develop. (web/database, desktop, etc)

    Anyway, since no one has suggested it yet, just go php ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2011
  10. adante

    adante Member

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    import antigravity! python!

    It won't teach you the low level internals like assembly/c/cpp but for someone looking for a casual (AND RELATIVELY PLEASANT) introduction to programming and a fairly good effort/return ratio you could do worse than this.

    I'm a firm believer in the blub language but when it comes to first timers, I'm more inclined to suggest a few bush walks as opposed to tackling K2 right off the bat.
     
  11. Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    Best advice is to start, doesn't really matter what, just start something and do it wrong, then learn how to do it right.

    Jump in the deep end and everything that confuses you you'll be forced to learn, or you will give up, one of the two lol.
     
  12. Phido

    Phido Member

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    Don't laugh..

    BASIC..
    Honestly, it not that bad.

    Check out Freebasic. Or the ever popular VB6, or VBnet, or even qbasic.

    If C is a dictatorship then Basic is anarchy, do what ever feels natural and comfortable. You don't even need a manual, just write some code and see what happens. Heck in the 80's, they could get kindergarden to program code in basic on a toaster like a V20 that is more functional than most 1st year uni courses teaching C.
     
  13. Dogo

    Dogo Member

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    C# for coding and Powershell for scripting.
     
  14. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    It's supported on Windows and Linux, and quite a few embedded systems. It's a wonderful language, but unfortunately the things it's really good at (realtime stuff and multi-tasking) isn't really supported on many platforms (for example, most microcontrollers are hopeless at multitasking, and most desktop operating systems cannot give realtime guarantees).

    That said, if you want to do a multithreaded program on a desktop PC (without the realtime guarantees), Ada is amazing. Multithreading and inter-task communications just works, which is exactly what doesn't happen in C.


    OP: what are you aiming for? If you're doing microcontrollers, learn C. If you're doing multithreading, I'd go for Ada. If you're just using it to play with, Python is pretty good.
     
  15. BeanerSA

    BeanerSA Member

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    Python was perfect for a hack like me, who just wanted to understand some 'concepts' of program design. Now I can hack about in most languages, it's just a case of looking up the syntax and the libraries. If you use a good IDE you get a helping hand with syntax anyway.
     
  16. IKT

    IKT Member

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    Forget what these guys are saying, Ubuntu is the best to use.
     
  17. BeanerSA

    BeanerSA Member

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    I can't tell if you are serious?
     
  18. chip

    chip Member

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    Using pthreads makes multithreading easier in C/C++. It's still not exactly beginner friendly, but it does make it manageable.

    edit: http://andrewvos.com/2011/02/21/amount-of-profanity-in-git-commit-messages-per-programming-language/
    Programming languages ranked by profanity in comments. Surely instructive for the putative developer?
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2011
  19. Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    Python is another great language to consider if you want something that's easy and powerful without being overwhelming at first.

    If you are looking at threading I've found C# to be an absolute breeze when trying to do threading.

    also take that link above seriously! haha
     
  20. adante

    adante Member

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    OP: put up a vote (I'm saying this now because I reckon python has it by the numbers)

    obviously not. For general purposes, it would be far more appropriate to program in gentoo
     

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