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Build Log: Bye Bye NBN, HELLO 4G!

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Yoodaa, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. netman

    netman Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
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    Location:
    Bay Area California
    I have a similar setup as I too work from my home. Got tired of constant wired broadband interruption from my local ISP, I purchased an AT&T 4G/LTE Unlimited Data pre-paid monthly plan and Netgear LB2120 4G LTE Modem and hooked it to my Asus RT-AC68U router. Now after each interruption of wired broadband the Netgear modem kicks in with no interruption of internet service. When wired signal is restored the internet goes back to my Motorola cable modem. I am getting full five bars signal on the LTE modem by placing it next to my living room window cause I live a quarter of mile from an AT&T cell tower. Speed of 45-65 Mbps down and 30-35 Mbps up on the cellular data is better than 50 Mbps down and 5 Mbps up on my wired broadband

    Eventually, I will disconnect my wired broadband service when 5G celluar becomes norm and 5G LTE modems come to market...
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
  2. sugaris

    sugaris Member

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    May 27, 2002
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    Location:
    Townsville
    It must be the standby modes then because i'm using the power supply it came with. I'll be using it (Via Ethernet port) and my internet connection will drop and the only way to get back online is to remove the battery and reset the device.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Yoodaa

    Yoodaa Member

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    Check the standby modes first and disable them. If it's the 5v 1a supply it's not enough! This has been covered in great detail over on whirlpool. Many people have resolved instability issues by using at least a 2.4a supply.
     
  4. sugaris

    sugaris Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks for the info mate... I will check this out. Cheers!
     
  5. trevor68

    trevor68 Member

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    Canberra
    Great work, it's such a relief in the end not to be dependent on the shitty NBN eh!
    We dodged it by going Fixed Wireless with The Signal Co here in Canberra, now the craptastic NBN can take forever as far as I'm concerned :)
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Yoodaa

    Yoodaa Member

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    Yup. Im unplugged now! Out of the matrix that is the NBN.
     
  7. Isiman

    Isiman Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2001
    Messages:
    62
    Thanks for all the info, we use NBN FW x2 connections (different NTUs for each); 2x Telstra Fiber; and a Nighthawk as fourth failover - it has been used three times in anger in the last year!
    I will look at external mounting of it as it is not showing impressive speeds internally mounted.

    Could you please provide some details on the thermostat setup with the fan? Parts or links would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Yoodaa

    Yoodaa Member

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    Sure.

    Thermostat:

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/DC-12V-...grA5dhvqb0B//R3HEY44NtF2BBLypp&frcectupt=true

    And any 12v PC fan will do really. I just used a long life one from Jaycar as I was there and it was convenient.

    Cheers.
     
  9. Isiman

    Isiman Member

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    Aug 22, 2001
    Messages:
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    Great, thank you for the info!
     
  10. s4mmy

    s4mmy Member

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    If its going to be 'always on' run it without the battery in.
     
    someon3 likes this.
  11. Sunder

    Sunder Member

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    4,489
    Interesting and very informative thread, OP.

    I did something similar, but without all the detail. My dad's holiday house is in the hilly areas of Wisemans Ferry. It gets about -114db to -117db without an antenna, so between unreliable and no internet, and a lot of dropped packets for voice.

    As a holiday house, I didn't want to spend as much as you, so I got out the map, had a look at which towers were closer, vs which were on the hilly side, vs the river side, and ended up selecting a tower a bit further away, but no interruptions. With a 5dB panel directional, I get about 105-107dB on single channel (no MIMO) which gives me about 24 down, 30ish up, close to zero packet loss. Not sure how the maths works for the dB gain, but I guess positioning the antenna also gives some gain without the antenna.

    I'm wondering how long before people in good 4G areas realise that they can get faster, more reliable and cheaper internet by getting big 4G modems, over NBN. Probably not big Netflix streamers, but for most people, Vodafone is doing 150Gb for $80/month, with throttling after all that's used. They're probably paying half that for their normal phone service anyway, so can get rid of a $90 a month NBN connection, for $40, and some months they might get throttled for a few days.

    Good thing is that it also scales with the number of people in the house, and you can do some crude sharing. If you run out of data (or about to), you could share your wife's data through mobile hotspots for a bit.
     
  12. chip

    chip Member

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    TBH going down that path is probably getting into diminishing returns territory for your situation. But as an enthusiast exercise, there's plenty of fun to be had rolling your own embedded system with specific radio modules and so on.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    Yoodaa

    Yoodaa Member

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    Yeah agreed. Looking at the pricing too, I can get a couple of NH's for the price of just the Sierra card so probably not worth pursuing.
     
  14. theSeekerr

    theSeekerr Member

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    How many people are stuck on really sub-par NBN connections? (as opposed to the large number of people still waiting for any NBN at all)
    Everyone I know on HFC and FTTP have had no issues, and I only know one person having a crappy FTTN experience (<30M on a 50M plan)
     
  15. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    just quietly, i'm stoked with my HFC connection via ABB. peak speeds are blistering. and fingers crossed we get the upgrade to 1000/100 soon
     
  16. SuiCid3

    SuiCid3 Member

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    A question for the many people that are stuck with fixed wireless I guess?
     
  17. s4mmy

    s4mmy Member

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    Where did you read 1000/100 speeds on HFC? :confused:
     
  18. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    DOCSIS 3.1 tests by NBN have shown 1000/100 can be switched on when ever NBN are ready to throw the switch. All the NTDs on HFC are ready to go.
    D3.1 allows for higher speeds too
    /off-topic
     
  19. Sunder

    Sunder Member

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    TBH? No idea. But if 142k are owed refunds for slow speeds, there are probably others who are getting sub par performance not bad enough to justify a refund:

    https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=i&...aw1cRHCPi_4dNYY_eeVi-AAu&ust=1548329106431357
     
  20. OP
    OP
    Yoodaa

    Yoodaa Member

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    It's also about the definition of sub par speeds. Officially (and someone please correct me if I'm wrong here) but the minimum acceptance from an isp before they will admit there is actually an issue with speed is 3mbit. That's appalling if true, and I would imagine anyone on that kind of connection, even though being told it meets minimum mandates, would be furious (and better off sending and receiving via pigeon!). That's what the minimum should have been 20 years ago, not in this day and age.

    Does anyone have any clarification on this figure? It was quoted to me some time ago by a mate who worked for an isp, but maybe it's changed?
     

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