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Building a home - Cabling plan

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by her0, Apr 14, 2014.

  1. her0

    her0 Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Sydney, NSW
    Hi Guys,

    Was wondering if I could ask for assistance with the general planning of where and what i should consider when running (pref cat6) cables through my home to be. Hopefully i am able to call upon other's experience and avoid missing things and such.

    The area i will be residing in has FTTP through Telstra velocity and as part of the builder's requirements, they provide some basic wiring (TVs, phone, 1 data point for internet) throughout the house.

    At the moment, i am thinking of allocating at least 1 data point in each bedroom, 1 for the family, 1 for the meal room and probably several for the theatre room.

    Now i am not too network savvy, and not sure how to go about the set up of the arrangement. I've read that if there are more than 5+ data points returning to a central area, that i should consider a hub/switch to manage the network.

    At this point in time, i will be asking our builder for a quote (which will probably be expensive) and may explore other cablers for quotes.

    things that we'll be using the network for are the general stuff such as torrenting, streaming videos and gaming.

    If anyone has any suggestions and tips about how to go about arranging the set up of the network in our new home, at least i'll know exactly what i'll be asking for when obtaining quotes.

    Copy of our plan if anyone was curious (single storey)

    [​IMG]
     
  2. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    If you can afford it, put them everywhere. Absolutely EVERYWHERE. Network ports can be used for much more than just simply computers. PoE devices like phones, chargers, ip cameras etc etc. Even fridges use them. And more than 1 per port if you can.
     
  3. fuXK

    fuXK Member

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    Even in your toilet haha

    I put 2/3 port per room. Lounge room maybe 5 depends on your devices. wifi is pretty good now days easily can stream 1080p bluray
     
  4. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    Hell yeh! Never know when you need that port! :lol:
     
  5. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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  6. OP
    OP
    her0

    her0 Member

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    haha point taken regards to multiple ports everywhere.

    i suppose i would have a budget limitation, has anyone ever arranged for a third party tradie to come around during construction to install network cables throughout the place?

    anyone have recommendations for cablers that i might be able to contact for quotes?

    edit: thanks Pugs, will have a read.
     
  7. Cape_Horn

    Cape_Horn Member

    Joined:
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    #1 - Listen to Pugs.
    #2 - I just built a place, 4br+study, 38 network ports (inc. dedicated points in the roof for ceiling mounted APs)
    Unfortunately, I don't have a current picture, but the last one I have is

    Click to view full size!

    and this is what got stuck into it (for the moment.)

    Click to view full size!

    (plus another two servers, a rack mounted NAS etc.)

    More to come

    Reality - do I need this much - well, not yet.
    Could it be useful in the future. Yes.
    Do I believe wireless is the way of the future? F*** No.
    Can you future proof a house? no. Can you make it damn useful for another 10-20 years? yes, and that was the intention.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    her0

    her0 Member

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    Hi Cape,

    Did you arrange for a third party to install this? or was it with the builder or something you did most of the work for?
     
  9. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    Cheers Cape.. :)
     
  10. heydonms

    heydonms Member

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    It doesn't (or shouldn't) cost that much more to run 4 ports rather than one or two. The labour is the same, they just use more spools of cable and sockets. It is cheaper to have extra sockets installed now than to try to add them later.

    You need 1 switch port (no one uses hubs any more) for each point that will be active. If you only intend to use 4 ports for now, then your existing router probably has that many. If you want to activate more then a 8-16 port switch will probably be fine. Remember that most of the ports are there for flexibility and won't be used simultaneously so you don't need to go buy four 24 port switches straight away (not looking at anyone in particular :p).
     
  11. sjp770

    sjp770 Member

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    I cabled my place with 6 points behind the main TV Area, it was barely enough.

    I put two points in my office, should have put 4. Any room you want a phone add a double point.

    Put a double in your garage, 2 either side if you can.
    4 points in the study, 2 in each bedroom, a double in the WIR (top shelf - useful for a DVR for home security).
    Get a comms cabinet like this: http://bit.ly/1qWjiB4 and put it in the top of the "Store" or "WIP" as marked on the plan.
    4 points in the IT nook...
    I'd skip the kitchen unless you are going to have a base station for the cordless phones there.

    For best cost don't go over 24 points. Cat 6 Patch panels can be dear. If you can find a switch that's fanless its much nicer even if its in a cool cupboard.

    Remember overkill gives you options. I got a sparky friend to crawl under the floor for me. For my parents new house I just told the sparky to allow for a few more points on the walls and I ran the cable on their down day before plaster. You could run the cable yourself and ask a sparky/data tech to terminate it. If you do make sure its all labelled neatly at each end.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    her0

    her0 Member

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    so let's say i'll will route some 16 total points back to a port patch panel which connects to a switch. from this switch is where you would have your router/modem for internet and wifi.

    16 data points > patch panel > switch < router and modem

    so to my minimal understanding, is that how it works? the switch powers the home network basically in terms of distributing data?

    edit: yeah, i'll be looking to have a data cabinet also. Thanks sjp.
     
  13. trackhappy

    trackhappy Member

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    Internet connected bidet?
     
  14. sjp770

    sjp770 Member

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    The 16 ports could be used for other things. If you connect them all to the switch then they are all data points. If you have a phone line you could plug that into any port in the cabinet and have the phone anywhere in the house.

    but yeah, Data line into the house > router > switch < all points you want to have the network / internet.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    her0

    her0 Member

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    Ah I see. Understood.

    As we build our home, our builder will be providing us 2 phone outlets and TV antennas, will this need to also be routed to the switch? or do they go else where? (in a telstra velocity estate, all phone, FTA, Foxtel and internal are run through the same fibre optic cable)
     
  16. sjp770

    sjp770 Member

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    If they for instance put internet and phone in the garage you could put 2x data points in the shed and still have the comms cabinet where every you want.Better to decide where your cabinet will go and ask them to install it directly there.

    EDIT:
    If you are going to run a PC based PVR then get an Arial point installed in the comms cabinet and grab a HD Homerun (http://www.silicondust.com/products/hdhomerun/dvbt/)
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2014
  17. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    Programmable bidet and flushing? Why the hell not? :D
     
  18. Turbine

    Turbine Member

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    Have 4 ports in every room.
    You'll be surprised what else you can use the cat5 for.
    (HDMI over CAT5, audio, poe phone, smart tv)
     
  19. ChoppedLiver

    ChoppedLiver Member

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    I'm guessing that'd be for pootube ? :tongue:
     
  20. sjp770

    sjp770 Member

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    My lounge room has the following connected to ethernet:
    Smart TV
    Bluray player
    Amp
    HTPC
    HD homerun

    Did have these as well:
    PS3
    XBOX 360
    T-Box

    As well as a base station on the other side of the room for the cordless phones.

    It adds up quicker that you think. Also always add a spare where you think you'll need one port. I.E a network printer is a great thing but you might not have one yet.
     

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