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Building a home - Cabling plan

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by her0, Apr 14, 2014.

  1. Copie

    Copie Member

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    The more the better, i ended up with 60 or so terminations in my build (4 bedroom house) i cabled it myself then had it signed off by an accredited cabler when he was over for a BBQ.

    8 in the lounge room (6 behind the main entertainment unit 2 behind the couch) 4 in each bedroom (1 where the tv is, 2 at the desk and 1 behind the bed) 10 in the study (all 10 behind the desk) 2 in toliet, 2 in main bathroom and 2 in ensuite, 3 in the kitchen, 3 in the dining room, 4 outside on the deck, 4 in the double garage, 4 in the third garage and 6 in the shed.

    All Cat 6.

    As mentioned you can run HDMI over it, so that was the original plan, basically have a media system in the rack that i can stream to anywhere in the house. Was cheap anyways, used a bit over 3 rolls of Cat 6 + 3 wall plates and terminations etc, cost was <1500 all done and dusted.

    28 of those ports are 10gb as well.
     
  2. andyroo54

    andyroo54 Member

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    I'm not really sure I would be running cat6 cables everywhere if I didn't have a planned use for it. I can appreciate wanting to do it while the house is being built but realistically I can't see the cost being much more if you get it done once the house is fully built.

    You need to consider why you might want it and also consider alternatives to hard-wired equipment.

    If it was me then I would probably want at least one port in every room, but that's because I could envision servers transferring large files etc. If your family just wants to use ipads or laptops then really AC wifi is going to suffice their needs.

    Yes you will need a switch but I don't think you need a managed switch, just any 24 port dumb switch will do. One port is the uplink the other 23 are for clients. Something like this:

    http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=17148&cPath=331

    Then I'd get two of these in the roof, one at each end:

    Unifi AP AC
    http://www.ubnt.com/unifi#apac

    As for router it sounds like you want something simple, personally I'd just pfsense but these look pretty awesome and low cost too:

    Edge router lite:

    http://www.ubnt.com/edgemax#EdgeMAXhardware

    Very jealous of your FTTH.

    I ran cat 5 everywhere but in the end I'm the only computer in the house that uses it, besides the xbox in the loungeroom that's it. Everything else just uses N wireless.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2014
  3. OP
    OP
    her0

    her0 Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions! Wouldn't putting them in the roof potentially be a PITA? if you for whatever reason need to get to it? Nonetheless, i'll read into it more.

    As for the FTTH, i specifically looked for an estate with FTTH available. Need dem interwebz.
     
  4. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Running cables when there's no plasterboard up, is much easier = faster = cheaper.

    As for pulling cables. Pulling 1 cable or 4 into a room is the same work. You just pay the extra materials (cable/terminations).

    Coming back later to pull more cable is harder = slower = expensive.

    So for the outlay of extra cable and terminations now (you don't even have to connect them all up now), you can save yourself a bundle in the future on labour.
     
  5. sjp770

    sjp770 Member

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    Btw, I got end of spool cat6 from a mate after he had wired up some cop shops. Long enough for me but not most of the jobs he does.. cheap as chips and no reason not to run a heap of cable. Good quality stuff as well. Even if you dont terminate it all (leave it in the walls but remember where!)
     
  6. heydonms

    heydonms Member

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    Have you ever had to chase into a single brick wall to install conduit? Doing it when the house is being built would bad enough, but at least you can just hose the wall down when you are finished. Doing it after the carpet has gone in would be horrible.

    They are PoE so they get their power from an injector in the rack, you can restart them by unplugging them at the rack end. It would be a pain if/when you go to replace them (which is why I personally would mount them on the ceiling with a cable through the ceiling to a data point in the roof space), but then I probably replace my wireless gear more often than most.
     
  7. FiShy

    FiShy Member

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    Wireless is the devil! 10 UTP and 10 fibre runs to each room (even the loo) is the only way!
     
  8. Cape_Horn

    Cape_Horn Member

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    This.
    The way I looked at it was
    TV+Bluray Player+DVR+WiiU+ps4+XBone+WDLive+Amp and maybe running HDMI to elsewhere in the room? 8 ports kthx.
    6 ports in the study? (my pc, her pc, my work laptop, her work laptop, the printer, a spare for a friend who comes around as well - why leave him on wireless if he is sharing a desk) don't mind if I do.


    Close enough

    +webcam - and security system.
    Intruder goes and uses your toilet? get it on camera as the possessed toilet starts spraying him - hopefully the intruder F***s off and doesn't steal your shit.



    get one phone outlet near where you get the rest of the network is going to be terminated, just so you can have a phone line anywhere in the house. The Digital antenna will come to a box and then turn into coax (well, mine did) so that can go where ever you want the TV's to go. (sparky will setup a standard junction and star it out from there) Foxtel may go over Cat6 these days, unsure, I thing I read that TransACT cable TV was doing it that way, shich means that you can run your set top box whereever on the network too. (just not through the switch, but there are ways and means of pushing theat signal over multiple points).

    ------------------

    Okay, I forgot to grab a picture of my rack as it is, (parked the car in front of it) I need to clean it up anyway - so no great loss, will post a newer picture.... when I get around to it.

    For me, I discussed structured data cabling with my builder who said "???" So I went to the sparky and said - how much extra to do some data cabling, he quoted me $200 a point. I asked him if he was happy to sign it off if I did the work, and he inspected it afterwards, he was fine with that (I know the rules and regs, he looked them up to see if I got it right).
    So I spent an afternoon before the plasterers cam and ran the wires myself, then terminated them once the walls were on. Sparky was happy and so was the building inspector.
     
  9. andyroo54

    andyroo54 Member

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    If you can't get in your roof then just mount them on the ceiling. I've got a nanostation in the roof. Only reason you'd need to get to it is if it dies, which is pretty unlucky, they are quite reliable. Plus they run on power over ethernet, so to reboot them just unpatch them and repatch them, boom, reboot.

    Ubiquiti are really good in terms of constantly improving/fixing firmware and their online forums are great. We use heaps of their gear around my work, for links between buildings etc, they are brilliant.

    Check them out here:

     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2014
  10. knoted

    knoted Member

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    As a Network Engineer and licensed cabler I have a total of 8 ports throughout my house currently, will probably end up at about 16. I have 2 laptops, 1 HTPC, 2 router/switch/APs at either end of the house, network lab and half a dozen devices on wifi.

    It's all Cat5E. GigE runs fine on Cat5E and I'm not seeing a huge push to 10Gb in consumer devices. The other problem is terminating Cat6 is actually pretty tricky. It's not the actual cable that's the problem, it's putting the connector on the end. Certainly not something you could do as a DIY without a fair bit of practice.

    Yes future proofing and all that, but meh. The only time you'll max out 1Gb is transferring huge files from file server to computer. Are you going to be doing that very often?

    My recommendation for a new build would be double Cat5E in every bedroom, 4 or 6 in the study and media room. 2 - 4 singles in the roof cavity for APs (I'm keen to have a crack at the Unifi APs shortly). It is true though that a professional cabler won't charge much more for Cat6 over Cat5E.

    All of those run back to a 8RU or so rack somewhere out of the way with a 16, 28 or 48 port switch, possibly with PoE if you're looking at doing Voip or video surveillance. The switch can be upgraded later though, a basic 16 port is well under $200.
     
  11. heydonms

    heydonms Member

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    The push is currently directed at medium sized business and high tech small business. Next will come regular small business + prosumer and then regular consumer gear. You wouldn't put in light fittings that only last 15 years, why is data cabling different?

    You are also only looking at ethernet, HDMI can run over two cat5 cables or one cat6.

    You mean like 4k video?

    Then I don't see why you recommend cat5. Don't go overboard with cat7, sure, but cat6 is certainly cheap enough that it isn't worth messing about on a new install.
     
  12. silenthunter

    silenthunter Member

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    Just curious as to why you guys are going for 6-7 points behind the TV. Why not just run one or 2 and put a switch behind the TV? Its unlikely that the htpc, tv, ps3, amp etc etc are all going to need loads of bandwidth at once. Or was it more just a case of if you are building a new house why not? I guess it makes sense in a new build, in an existing house it might be unnecessary expense though?

    Edit: Suppose I'm only thinking of using the runs for IP traffic, where as you want multiple runs for the purpose of PoE or HDMIoE?
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2014
  13. Copie

    Copie Member

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    Multiple switches can get messy and yeah bandwidth.

    By the time you have the TV, htpc, blurays player, ps4/xbox etc hooked up you easily burn through 6 + ports.
     
  14. silenthunter

    silenthunter Member

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    I'm not sure I buy that argument, with 1Gbit ethernet I can't imagine how you'd be sucking enough bandwidth from every device concurrently for it to become an issue. I've always used unmanaged switches at each end without issue from a configuration or bandwidth PoV. Certainly understand the argument for non-IP traffic though.
     
  15. fergo

    fergo Member

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    I used to believe in Cat6 to every room but I'm about to sign off on our electrical variations on a new build. A standard cost of adding Cat6 data ports to each room is $110 and a lot of builders won't let you do or arrange your own cabling. There is no discount for multiple runs to each room. I am only going to run Cat6 where I need it.

    We have eight rooms in our house (not including toilets!). Four runs to each room would be $3520. Would you guys really recommend doing it at that price? There are so many better things to upgrade.

    If you can do it for cost of materials, fair enough, but what will you use it for? We have multiple laptops, tablets, phones and a printer all of which use only wifi.

    I am cabling for 2xwifi APs, 1xsecurity camera, 1xVoIP doorbell, 2xTV/media points, all terminated under the stairs.

    1Gbit wifi (actual throughput) is about a year away. 10Gbit over Cat6 will be mainstream in 3-5 years but it is available now. Therefore you can use a switch for multiple ports in one room if required.
     
  16. Optimus.

    Optimus. Member

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    Pugs did my place the other year before I moved in, quite happy with the result. Recommended. :thumbup:
     
  17. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    That's because the builders don't like variation and anything extra is "additional" and charge you through the roof. Only thing I would recommend is get them to run conduits instead of cables for internal walls. Unless the whole house is like that. For my house, I had it done after the build because of the same reason. But for me, my exterior walls are double bricked, so i just plan all the points on the exterior walls so no chasing or conduits are required.
     
  18. fuXK

    fuXK Member

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    Yes if your not lazy you can always switch ports to every device un used, save cost
     
  19. Optimus.

    Optimus. Member

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    'multiple switches'... ? Hmm.

    I had 2 Cat 6 ports run to the main home theatre area. One run doesn't seem to be wired up properly though and I've been running fine on a small 8 port GB switch.

    PS3, XBox, laptop... Basically I'm struggling to envision a need for more than 6 ports and any situations which would have all 6 devices requiring full bandwidth at the same time.
     
  20. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    HDMI to/from other rooms via cat6? PoE devices can get away with a local PoE switch, however that's kinda clunky way of doing things. Not requiring another power point for switch too is good. Less devices the better.
     

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