bUt THeRe iS nO dEMANd - 1000/50, 250/25 now 2% of AussieBB's customers

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by NSanity, Jun 9, 2020.

  1. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    https://gsuite.google.com.au/intl/en_au/compare-editions/

    GSuite business (or higher) has team shared drives and unlimited space (requires at least 4 active accounts, otherwise you're capped to 1TB each). The 30GB limit is only on their basic edition.

    By all means, switch if you like. But if you "never heard of that", you should at least do yourself the good of seeing exactly what's on offer before leaving. There's far more than just extra drive space on offer (eVault for example, if you have compliance requirements. oAuth2 as well that is very useful if you have lots of cloud services). It's all there in writing.

    Traffic is traffic, whether it's over a VPN or not. Having a VPN doesn't hide from your ISP how many bytes fly back and forth through the pipe.

    I find a lot of folks lately using VPNs who don't understand them. Makes me wonder why they'd pay money for a service they don't understand, and probably assume gives them more safety than it actually does. That's a little worrying.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2020
  2. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    Go with launtel, turn Gbit on for 1 day, then turn back down to desired speed. Win!
     
  3. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    I'm well aware that the VPN does not conceal traffic. I do *think* I have a reasonable grasp of what a VPN does, and how. What I am not sure about is at what level my data is encrypted. My assumption is that it is at the signal origin, ie. my computer, and the destination, ie. the VPN server, so by the time it reaches the Nielsen traffic monitor it should be just... traffic?

    My questions would not be necessarily based on security, but rather functionality. I've had websites flag me as using a VPN and disallowing my connection as a result. Of course many VPN servers are no doubt known and flagged as such, and there would be some form of database which websites could access identifying my data as coming from a VPN source, allowing those websites the option of refusing my connection.

    My (more than 90%) primary use for a VPN is to beat geoblocking, although I do infrequently use a torrent client too. I generally only enable the VPN on occasions such as these, although I admit I've forgotten to switch it off occasionally too.

    If a website can identify that I am using a VPN, I'm simply curious as to whether the Nielsen monitor will also, and thus skew or flag any data that may pass through it. My assumption is that it won't, as it *should* just monitor traffic, not content.

    I'm happy to be educated regarding any misconceptions I may have. If it helps, I use PIA, which is not supposed to be keeping logs, but again, I am not really concerned about being hidden on the net anyway, as circumventing geoblocking is what I primarily need from it.
     
  4. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Packets go into a "filter" at your end, and come out of a corresponding "unfilter" at the VPN provider's end. Anyone attempting to look at the data in between sees only garbage, but can count how much garbage goes past.

    That's for regular use. Depending on how the VPN is configured, there's an initial connection phase, and there may or may not be plain text DNS lookups that occur then. That can give your ISP (or anyone sniffing your data, or whatever DNS server you're pointing to) and idea of what VPN service you are initially connecting to. But after that, everything should be encrypted, including your DNS requests.

    Your data pops out of your VPN provider's IP, so in that respect the "privacy" you're granted is only that your source IP is obfuscated. VPN IP pools are well known (particularly with many smaller mobs just being resellers of larger ones), so identifying traffic coming from a VPN provider is quite simple.

    Similar to if you route your traffic through an AWS/Azure/GoogleCloud host, you'll often get flagged by streaming services for the same reason - the IP pools belonging to these services are well known, so identifying traffic coming from a data centre rather than a home user is quite easy.

    As above, VPN provider IP address pools are well documented. It's quite trivial to work out traffic coming from a VPN provider based solely on IP address alone.

    No. The data (at least, the volume of it) will still be calculated correctly. Encryption may add a very slight overhead in size, but it'll be less than 1%. Latency and jitter might be a different story (see below).

    Their FAQ states that they only care about traffic volumes, latency and jitter. i.e.: pure network level statistics, not application-level content. (Whether or not they're telling the truth, I can't verify).

    One thing of note is that your experience on the Internet via a VPN is limited to what the VPN provider can send back to you. i.e.: your ping time inside the VPN tunnel will be different to your ping time outside the tunnel. Say, if you ping an Australian host without the VPN enabled, your ping goes to it and returns, never leaving the country. Turn on the VPN, and now your ping must travel over to the VPN endpoint in another country, to the host you're pinging, back to the VPN endpoint, back to you. Even at the speed of light, it takes information around 130ms to travel once around the Earth, so a ping to the other side of the planet and back cannot ever be faster than that, and that's being added to your latency.

    In that respect, the Nielsen Panel data will show a less diverse range of sources, latency and jitter compared to someone not using a VPN. But with that said, VPN users are still legitimate users, so your data is still valuable.

    A recent leak showed 7 major VPN providers (who in turn have many smaller groups rebundling their services under different brands), all of whom claim "do not keep logs", do indeed keep logs. 20 million VPN users had PII (Personally Identifiable Information) leaked.

    https://www.vpnmentor.com/blog/report-free-vpns-leak/

    I know you've mentioned you use the service more for avoiding geoblocking, but for the sake of anyone else reading this, a low cost or free VPN provider is not something that can or will keep you safe on the Internet. Likewise using a VPN still doesn't stop various trackers inside your tunnel from spying on your habits, nor does it hide you if you are using social media (even if you don't have a social media account, trackers exist on numerous pages that can identify you even without a corresponding account). Using the Internet and maintaining privacy requires more effort than just flicking on a VPN. (Again, understanding that you specifically aren't using it for that, merely mentioning it for anyone else who might be reading).
     
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  5. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    I assumed most people use VPN to avoid geoblock and to be safer when pirating.

    Using the whole "Dallas buyers club" incident as an example, a VPN would have prevented them knowing who downloaded it and which ISP's to go after. (at least that's my understanding)

    The new retention laws require a warrant don't they for your ISP to hand over any data? Don't think we will see much of that for low level piracy.
     
  6. koopz

    koopz Member

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    meh.. most of you voted for it.
     
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  7. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    We voted for shit broadband?
     
  8. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Nobody voted for any broadband, shit or otherwise. The problem with our system is that issues around communication and technology take a back seat to far more politically charged issues like tax, environment or immigration. Even when Internet access is vital to our economic future.

    When 95% of Australia's voting public barely understands what a computer is, broadband was way down the list on issues voted for. And the 5% who do understand were still faced with the choice of potentially having to vote for policies they didn't like to get Internet they did like, which meant a fair chunk of those had to vote "the wrong way".

    Beyond that, what politician thinks more than 4 years ahead? Our whole system is designed around short term marketing and a flip-flopping voting base who never vote "for" anyone, but rather to just "vote out the current bastards and give the other ones a go for a bit".

    When it comes to political advertising budgets, 90% of them are spent in the last 3 days before an election. Why? Because that's all your average small-minded voter can remember. Even a week is too long, let alone the necessary considerations of years or decades.

    Nobody voted "for" anything, technology or otherwise. Most people voted "against" something based on emotion and angst of quite literally the moments leading up to their vote being cast.

    Fuck yeah, democracy.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  9. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    Unfortunately the majority of your post is probably true... but this part, I'd suggest those that envisaged a proper FTTP NBN as critical future infrastructure.



    JSmith
     
  10. sir_bazz

    sir_bazz Team Papparazi

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    ABB now has just over 5000 customers on these superfast plans. The demand is incredible.
     
  11. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    But there is no demand, no one needs it!

    [​IMG]



    JSmith
     
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  12. Cape_Horn

    Cape_Horn Member

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    Just over 5000?
    Last I read, they were at just over 5800
    (NBN then pointed out that there are also more users on superloop? and lautel, and the 9? vodafone customers)
     
  13. millsy

    millsy Member

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    Has there been any further stats released on how the uptake is going more broadly than ABB?
     
  14. Cape_Horn

    Cape_Horn Member

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  15. millsy

    millsy Member

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    All good, pity it's not more well reported, wonder why :p
     
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  16. connico

    connico Member

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    lol but you don't replace fibre ahahah
     
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  17. Hive

    Hive Member

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    Exactly.
     
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  18. connico

    connico Member

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    In the late 2000s, I ran a heap of fibre for the DET to public schools in NSW. Basically creating one of the largest private dark fibre networks for school that elected to run fibre. A decade later I was called in to discuss what it would cost to upgrade the network. Obviously I asked why and how much speed they were looking for lol... It surprised the board that all schools that had elected to go with fibre didn't need any substantial investment.

    It was the schools that has elected to stay on copper that needed substantial investment of which the schools couldn't or wouldn't invest in. During the digital education revolution there was substantial money invested into technology in classrooms and for infrastructure. The issue was, schools got to choose how those funds were allocated... many got it wrong lol

    I had a good chuckle when they decided to go with an NBN strategy instead... expect to hear back from them any day now ahhahaa
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2020
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  19. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    The available plans have changed again for me. Now its 250/25 (unlimited) for $129. I've signed up, beginning on my next monthly cycle, which will be the 6th. My birthday coincidentally :thumbup: A much better deal than the previous one. It remains to be seen if the line can cope. Sadly though, the gigabyte option is still not showing on my account. I assume that's because they have already ruled my area (HFC) out as incapable of that speed, or they are only offering it in some areas?
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2020
  20. FantoM_CircuiT

    FantoM_CircuiT Member

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    I must be in a garbage HFC area cause 100/20 is still the highest I can select at AussieBB :(

    Currently on 100/40 and I go through about 500gb of upload a month so I don't really want to lower my upload bandwidth anyway.
     
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