Cheap 3D Printers?

Discussion in 'Hobby Engineering' started by Aussiejuggalo, Apr 25, 2015.

  1. tumutbound

    tumutbound Member

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    Just received a message from Creality (logged in on their website) and my printer has shipped!
    The surprise is that it was shipped from Regents Park in NSW, not China as I thought it would be.
    All going well, I should have it by the 22nd - or rather a friend will have it since I put his address down as my address would probably have been considered remote. Most couriers consider anything outside Hobart CBD as remote :)
     
    LayZ likes this.
  2. iMomOx3

    iMomOx3 Member

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    Just a thought and figured I'd ask you guys around here and maybe convince (or unconvince) me to getting into 3D printing.

    What I'd use it for:
    Predominantly for board game accessories, pieces, meeples, box inserts, coins, holders/clips etc.
    Small plastic bits n bobs for the motorbike fairings... I'm sure I'll find other reasons but let's stick with board game accessories for now.

    Budget:
    Anywhere between $200-500 give or take. Now, rather than saying the best you can get for your max budget is X. I'd rather have some options depending on the above. If you say X is the best for $500, but Y will do everything you need for board game pieces at $300, then give me those options! Ideally, budget me like $150-200, $200-300, $300-400, $400-500 for example. It definitely helps me out.

    Requirements:
    Easy to learn. Easy to setup. Pricing for filaments/refills isn't too much of a concern as they can be picked up relatively cheap from what I've seen. Of course there's a lot of research for me to go about. Printing time doesn't concern me (if it's slow I don't care --- quality > speed for me).

    Size:
    I have no clue what size of a printer I'd need. Now again, all the stuff I'd be printing are small board game accessories, card holders, box inserts. The box inserts would be the biggest things I'd be printing but these can be divided up to smaller inserts to make up inside the boxes so not too much of an issue..

    Now, I could easily buy these inserts and accessories from 3d printing services however I am interested in learning to design my own stuff and not necessarily find existing designs off a directory - so yes it may turn out to be a costly investment but spending up to $500 on the printer, a couple more here and there on refills/filaments/other required accessories etc it's not too biggie of a bad financial decision for me and I will learn something I feel I'm going to enjoy lots.

    Lastly, does anyone have some detailed resources on where to learn about designing, what programs to start with, all in the one website? Just want some reading materials to make sure I can grasp the hobby and learn to do everything from maintaining the printer, designing my own models from scratch, etc etc..

    Thanks guys!
     
  3. miicah

    miicah Member

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    Fusion360 is the most common one (or at least the most powerful for the least amount of money).

    Resin printers are good for small things.
     
  4. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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  5. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    It really depends on what the person is trying to print. Ender 3D Pro or any other FDM printers are shit for tiny things like minitatures. No matter how much tweaking/tinkering you do, it simply won't print small stuff properly. Then again, things like motorbike fairing or any parts that require more strength, a FDM printer may have an edge over this. Resin tends to be more brittle. But there are more and more resins being released with different properties now. Like rubbery ones and ones that can be sintered into metal. Or casting resin etc.

    Also resin printer is not that nasty. There's a bit more care required, but it's like using a kitchen knife, just need to be careful and not rush things. Water washable resins remove need to use IPA completely.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019
  6. OP
    OP
    Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Resin can be nasty but if you want simplicity there's nothing better than it, FDM has hundreds of settings and countless things that can go wrong, resin has 5 settings and is stupidly easy to fix issues which are mostly unlevel build plates.

    The downside to resin is, it's expensive, messy to work with and super small print area.
     
  7. iMomOx3

    iMomOx3 Member

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    The motorbike fairings for printing is not a necessity but just a thought on other reasons to get into this aside from just board game accessories... however, the board game stuff is still the priority/main reason to this so if I can get a printer that would do my requirements well enough, then I can sacrifice any future plans of doing motorbike fairing bits n bobs.

    Ideally, an out of the box printer with minimal setup and easy to setup bed is ideal.

    In saying that, miniatures, tokens, box inserts are my plans for starters.
     
  8. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    For miniatures the Anycubic Photon or Wanhao D7 are great for that. There's currently 20% discount on ebay so the Wanhao printer is $440 delivered.
    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/DLP-3D-...d65ab530f:m:mMppH91XPh-Tai-uC8VWbZw:rk:1:pf:0

    Between the 2 printer, i'd say Photon is the better one to get. But D7 is a great printer too. I really haven't had any issues with mine. Grab some Wanhao Water Washable resin too. It's usable with pretty much either printer. Save you having to use IPA to clean up.

    Edit: Actually Photon is $4 cheaper!!
    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/AU-STOC...h=item46799a1124:g:Wz8AAOSwwAdbJGa~:rk:1:pf:0
    use code : PSAVEIT
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019
  9. iMomOx3

    iMomOx3 Member

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    Cheers. I'll look into resin type printers as well. Not looking at purchasing just right now so might lose out on this sale unfortunately.

    I'd like to look into more options, $440 is a good price but I want to open up to other cheaper alternatives too.

    Edit: damn that Photon looks good and the details from the examples too! Research time
     
  10. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    With resin printing you may also want to grab a sufficiently large ultrasonic cleaner which is around $70-80 on ebay, and either build or buy a UV curing chamber. It's pretty simple to build one, just buy 5m roll of UV LED strip and stick it in a paint tin or milo tin.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Just be careful when using an ultrasonic cleaner and IPA, cheap cleaners can set IPA on fire which wouldn't be good... You can even use a UV torch to cure it which is what I do, only takes a few mins.
     
  12. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    Oh yeh IPA and Ultrasonic cleaner can be bad. Which is why i highly recommend water washable resins. :D I use UV torch for spot curing. Like if i have a small hole, I just apply a little bit of uncured resin with a tooth pick and cure it with torch. Works great. Like using putty but you're using same material instead.
     
  13. iMomOx3

    iMomOx3 Member

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    So what makes a resin printer much more difficult than a FDM type?

    Watching this video here makes it look pretty easy ??? Or is there much more involved than levelling the build plate and then pouring the resin into the tray???



    Looks much easier than dealing with string filaments lol
     
  14. OP
    OP
    Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    If you get the cleaners for electronics then it's normally safer but those costs a few hundred to a thousand or more. I use the torch just to cure all my prints, quicker and easier.

    Honestly resin
    Resin is far easier than FDM, resin has literally 5 settings where as FDM has over 100, you'll spend weeks or months tuning your profile for FDM, resin can be done in an hour at most. As for levelling, my Photon took me 5 mins to level, perfectly flat and done, my Ender 3 not level because the beds badly warped in all 4 corners and makes a bowl in the centre at different angles... granted it's only the tiniest bit but it's enough to completely screw up a print as big as a Raspberry Pi case.

    I won't even get started on the utter headaches of getting a decent print from my Ender 3 after spending 2 weeks fucking with settings :mad:.
     
  15. iMomOx3

    iMomOx3 Member

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    So what I'm getting from this so far (which is ticking all the right boxes for the most of it):

    - A resin type printer like the Photon 3D is slightly more expensive than a budget FDM like a Ender 3...but....
    - Easier to setup
    - Works basically out of the box
    - Levelling is easy as fuck
    - All I do is pour liquid into a tray, hit print, and for the most of it, is more consistent in printing than FDM.
    - Just requires some cleaning after use (the build plate and resin tray)
    - A little pricier to purchase resin

    AND most of all, it's better for miniatures/board game pieces which is what I wanted to make anyway?

    Only thing I can see wrong with it is the printing space is small which probably wouldn't fit my requirement for box inserts.
     
  16. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    Oh it's not more difficult. If anything it's easier. It's just more to do after you print it, and because you're working with resin, you do have to be careful since it can be a health hazard. Also depending on which resin, it can be fairly smelly. But printing wise it's far easier than FDM.
     
  17. Franc

    Franc Member

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    Can you give examples of what you will be printing? Just use some thingiverse links..
     
  18. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    My latest 3D prints. The 3 on the right are mine the left 2 are from ebay. They're printed to be part of a 1/6 scale diorama. Printed 3 different ones to test scaling and aesthetics.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. iMomOx3

    iMomOx3 Member

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    Some basic stuff like these could be done on a FDM type and I wouldn't care too much about detail once I sand them down:

    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3044394
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2795157
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2945049

    I also want to do some more detailed pieces like which may require the DLP like the Photon 3D:

    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3304834
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2029535
    *there are definitely more detailed pieces I have in mind but don't want to spend too long searching on thingiverse at this stage.

    A big majority of the prints whilst starting off will be simple box inserts with little to no detail, just card walls etc. However, I am in the process of designing a board game for myself which I'd love to have more detailed miniatures, but will also need some detailed building miniatures like banks, towers, trees, etc.
    In some cases I will also be doing some detailed terrains for tabletop games.

    I'd also love to give these a shot to add to my zoids displays: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1702210 - But I think these are far too detailed for any of these budget type printers. The option to make weapons/parts/limbs as extensions to my existing HMM Zoids for some custom mods would be ideal once I learn to design my own.

    A little more research leads me to a few things with the DLP AnyCubic Photon 3D being the best for me in terms of miniatures and probably the Zoid stuff for detail.
    The FDM would be best cost wise for materials and a bigger printing space (at this price range) to make the basic board game stuff like tokens, clips, shields, and box inserts.

    I would also LOVE to make this for myself: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2788752
    But that would require a bigger printing area and just wouldn't be possible in the Photon.

    So I was looking at either the DLP AnyCubic Photon 3D or FDM Creality CR-10 Mini...thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2019
  20. OP
    OP
    Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Got some new filaments today, eSun silk purple & blue as well as luminous green and glass purple & blue :leet:

    From top right: Luminous blue & green. Silk jacinth, blue & purple. Glass purple & blue. PLA Grey & peak green. Also some really old Arurum ABS samples jammed in the corner.


    Click to view full size!


    Now to get working settings and actually print with it :rolleyes:.
     

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