Chinese electrical components

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by whatdoesthisdo, Apr 1, 2019.

  1. whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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  2. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    Flip a coin - a ridiculous ammount of electrical 'n electronic stuff is already made in China.

    All you can do to give yourself some degree of confidence perhaps is go for the dearer Name Brand stuff perhaps. But even that's no guarantee nowadays...
     
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  3. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Most, if not all is made in China/Asia, to varing degrees of quality, which is usually determined by the length of the warranty if any. I buy stuff of Aliexpress all the time for IOT projects, once you find a supplier with decent quality (QA) I tend to stick with them accross their entire range, and most products branded as western based companies are usually manufactured in Asia. I will add 1 point, Taiwanese and Korean electronics on the whole are as good if not better than Japanese, and all 3 as a general rule are mostly better then Chinese unless they are household names like Apple etc.
     
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  4. dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    Yep agree with two previous posts. Generally you get what you pay for, if you bottom-dollar it, don't have high expectations, put in extra protection if you're worried. Don't cheap out on power supplies either, buy in Australia and then the retailer has liability.
     
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  5. OP
    OP
    whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    The problem is when it comes to electrical I have no idea what I am talking about. I watch a youtube video and basically copy the things they have used and 99% of the time it's chinese stuff from amazon.

    For example the power supply above I have no idea where to get from within Australia

    What sort of protection could I put in?
     
  6. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    For warranty, yes. For product, no.

    Most of the stuff sold here is made in China. As you pointed out, the only difference in paying more locally is that the retailer takes responsibility for faulty equipment.

    With that said, when I buy stuff from China, I factor in the price. If an Australian retailer has the same product for double the money, then I can buy two from China and have a spare. Ultimately it's the same product from the same factory anyway, so the "you get what you pay for" idea doesn't apply when you're literally just paying for middle men.
     
  7. power

    power Member

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    just because the things you buy are also made in china doesn't mean shit.

    not everything you buy on ebay/aliexpress is actually built to Australian standards, unlike things that are sold IN Australian retail stores.

    the best thing for peace of mind, is a) insurance and to avoid said claim have the item fully tested.
     
  8. OP
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    whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    I may not have made it clear in the OP but this thread is about hard wiring electrical components to your house and how people can sleep at night with chinese NO NAME electronics.

    I can't seem to find anything locally
     
  9. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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  10. Zee

    Zee Member

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    I find a lot of stuff on Aliexpress that has been re-branded by some local mob, then sold for 4-5x the price.

    A smart door lock was the most recent example:

    Aliexpress price - $194 delivered
    Aussie locksmith price - $790
    they even used the same photos as Aliexpress. I'd at east take my own pics and try to make them look different somehow...

    Of course, I only do low voltage. 240V stuff I'd be somewhat more concerned.

    Z...
     
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  11. power

    power Member

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    because there's a metric shit tonne of money to be made doing this.

    People build their businesses off it. DVR's are a big one that i know of.
     
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  12. _zak

    _zak Member

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    I’m reasonably experienced with electronics, but nonetheless have a general rule of not connecting stuff to the mains. It depends on your risk appetite I guess - the probability of failure is low (> 99% of stuff will probably be fine), but the consequences could be pretty serious.
     
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  13. dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    That particular power supply I can't really help as I've never had a need to use or find one. find As for protection, an in-line fuse never hurt anyone!

    I meant that phrase more to compare Chinese products to other Chinese products, not people reselling here. If you just shop by price and buy the cheapest product, you will generally get what you pay for - corners will be cut and it will be have a high probability of being junk. Always exceptions to the rule of course, but I've noticed a lot of people love to buy $5 items from China and then complain about "cheap Chinese junk" when it inevitably fails. It's cheap junk, the fact it's Chinese is irrelevant. /rant

    Also, those middle men often give you support, something that you don't get from a lot of Chinese manufacturers (especially at the lower end).
     
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  14. mtma

    mtma Member

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    Often, I suppose is subject to perspectives.

    Certainly there's more than a few major middlemen across industries that have customer support about as helpful as being hit by wet tuna.
     
  15. Symon

    Symon Castigat ridendo mores

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    There is a thing call a regulatory compliance mark - http://www.rcm-mark.com.au/ before purchasing ask to see a photo of the label on the device. Technically speaking if there isn't an Australian RCM on the device or an indication as to what Australian standard the thing complies to then you shouldn't be connecting it to the mains.

    However if it complies to the EU standards (IEC, DN, EN, etc) then I personally wouldn't have a problem with using it.
     
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  16. Ahux

    Ahux Member

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    Jon Oxer (Freetronics) done an interesting youtube video on this just a few weeks ago as well has discussed at length the use of Sonoff devices (IoT/Home automation mains switches).

    Short version:
    1) If it connects to the mains in any way, it has to be certified
    2) You can not even legally change the mains plug on a device unless you have electrician certification.

    However, this only really becomes an issue if your house burns down and/or a criminal issue if someone gets killed.

    Once again, as stated above - Risk assessment is important.

    Having said that - There are plenty of other door access controllers that you could use that are not direct mains powered, just get a low voltage one and ignore everything above (but use a certified low voltage plug pack from Au!)
     
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  17. OP
    OP
    whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    Thanks man. Over the last there days I have being watching a tonne of videos and from what I gather I can buy and australian 12v plug like this
    upload_2019-4-3_10-45-31.png

    cut the end of it off and wire into the mag lock?

    upload_2019-4-3_10-53-15.png

    This one says it is CE certified, is that a load of BS or will it be genuine, or how do I prove it is genuine?


    EDIT: I also saw a guy use a PC PSU
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2019
  18. _zak

    _zak Member

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    That would work, and I’d be happy to use the lock with an AU-certified 12 V power supply. Safety-wise, the only other thing I’d want to consider is how the door can be opened in an emergency where there’s no power, but that’s outside the electrical arena.

    CE marks are a mess when it comes to determining which directives apply, and who does the testing - in many areas companies can self-certify that they’re compliant. I wouldn’t personally use that as evidence either for or against using the lock.
     
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  19. Ahux

    Ahux Member

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    Agreed, CE does not really mean much but I would not be concerned about it for that device anyway. As long as the plug pack is a good aussie supplied one (i.e grab a 12v 1A plug pack off an old router) it will be fine. No need for PC power supplies.

    I also echo Zak's response above in relation to emergency egress though. This is something really important!
     
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  20. Zee

    Zee Member

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    I usually go with "power to lock" systems. This means when power goes out, it will be unlocked by default. Throw in a UPS on top of that, and you should be golden (ie - the lock won't fail for every power outage, and can still be unlocked at any time, but worst case, if power is out and the UPS fails - escape is possible).

    Z...
     

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