Chinese electrical components

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by whatdoesthisdo, Apr 1, 2019.

  1. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    Exactly.

    JSmith
     
  2. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    Well if your home burns down due to a non-compliant device one may not be able to claim on their insurance... this is the main issue with aftermarket modified power cables etc.

    JSmith
     
  3. OP
    OP
    whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    Yeah the system I am looking at is a NC (normally closed) meaning when power is cut, it will be open. Totally fine for my media room application, wouldn't use that on say a front door where in times of a power cut you would want it to stay open.
     
  4. Zee

    Zee Member

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    Power is pretty reliable in Aus, though, so not much of an issue. Our cafe in the Philippines is a different matter, "brown outs" are fairly common, so needed to make sure we had reasonable measures in place to keep the door locked, but have possible escape in an emergency. UPS does the job!

    Z...
     
  5. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    Especially where Mr Nefarious Bastard could simply wander up to the power box on the side of the house, flick a switch/circuitbreaker and simply amble in through the front door to help themselves perhaps.

    So a suitable backed-up house alarm would need to be installed as well.
     
  6. Ahux

    Ahux Member

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    I think you interpreted that incorrectly. I completely agree with your statement. What I was inferring is that just because something has a CE mark on it, it does not necessarily mean that:
    a/ It is actually compliant to CE testing (Just printed on there, especially with Chinese market)
    b/ That it is approved for Australia (CE is an EU mandated standard, not Australian)
    c/ This device is of any better quality than one without the mark, just that it complies to the standard and has been certified.

    IMO, anything that comes out of China as a direct import (ebay, Ali, Banggood etc) that bares the CE logo is almost surely to be just printed on there for your peace of mind and is unlikely to reflect actual compliance or quality. This probably includes a lot of Amazon stuff too.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2019
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  7. aXis

    aXis Member

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    A number of years ago, China introduced a very similar looking CE mark that was actually "China Export", not "Conformité Européenne". You have to check closely to make sure it's the correct thing.
     
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  8. aXis

    aXis Member

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    Also, just a bit more on electric locks etc, I've been running two electric strikes at home for a few years now. I chose to use an electric strike instead of an electric bolt because if the power goes out, the handle and latch still function normally - just keep a spare set of keys around.

    One of the strikes is on a normal wooden door, that functions very simply. The door latch can pass over it and retract fine.
    The second strike is used for an aluminium security door. This was hard because the door uses a double throw deadbolt, not a latch. I had to get a special (and more expensive) strike to suit it.

    Finally, get a door lock with a "Vestibule Lock" function - lockable from the outside but always free to exit from the inside. They are reasonably common.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2019
  9. _zak

    _zak Member

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    I've seen this mentioned in a few places, and I'm pretty sure it's not the case - the European Commission have said that they thought it was more likely to be an incorrect version of the mark being used rather than something cunningly planned to take advantage of the official mark.

    Either way, the issue is still the same I guess - having the properly-spaced CE mark doesn't mean the product conforms to any standards, and conforming products might have the incorrectly-spaced mark (since it's become so prevalent).
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2019
  10. gdjacobs

    gdjacobs Member

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    This is a moot point anyway. Even if the CE mark is genuine and the product does fulfill all requirements in the Low Voltage Directive, there's quite a bit more legwork required for JAS-ANZ compliance. Showing compliance with IEC standards or other inspection regimes known to be founded in IEC standards (TUV, CSA, UL) is generally a superior approach.
     
  11. dephilile

    dephilile Member

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    Anything imported to Australia should have an RCM compliance mark.
    https://www.acma.gov.au/Industry/Su...pliance/Steps-to-compliance/product-labelling
    and
    http://www.erac.gov.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=128&Itemid=576

    If it does not have this mark it doesn't necessarily mean it is non-compliant from a safety point of view, but from a legal point of view it is not compliant and if your house were to burn down and the device was found to be at fault your insurance would probably not cover it. If it has an RCM compliance mark there has at least been some due diligence to make sure it is ok to use.
     
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  12. Privatteer

    Privatteer Member

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    Your better off using a battery backed up power supply rather than an UPS. Lot more efficient a small 7.2Ah can get around 10 hours depending on total load.
    As an example Din Mount or cage frame.
    Don't be confused about the sentence at top of page about compliance. It's badly done and if you click on its link actually referring to what category of electrical safety factor (1, 2, 3) it falls under.
    All gear I've ordered on the past from them has come with correct markings.

    The question is what are you trying to achieve with the lock? If you just want something that you toggle a switch to open/close just the power supply will do.
    If you want it to auto close etc more will be required.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    So whats the go with buying from Australian vendors off Amazon.AU? Surely the stuff they sell would have to be compliant with australian law?
     
  14. power

    power Member

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    why?

    Many Amazon sellers just drop ship.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    Why? Because I thought that Australian consumer protection law would protect against items bought within Australia. They laymen wouldn't even know what drop shipping is nor that was happening when they purchased something from Amazon.au. I was talking with my family a year ago about DS and none of them had heard of it. (Ages ranging from teenagers to baby boomers)

    Also many sellers don't drop ship, so how do you know what items are covered under Austrlian law and which ones weren't?


    EDIT: Looks like I am right. All sellers have to ensure what they are selling is legal, safe and have appropriate labeling...

    https://sellercentral.amazon.com.au...guage=en_AU&ref=efph_200164510_cont_200164330
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
  16. power

    power Member

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    so they are "supposed to".

    I wonder how well it's policed?
     
  17. OP
    OP
    whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    Well I don't think it will be policed by Amazon. However I wonder if these sellers realise their liability if someone's house was burn't down due to one of the these electrical devices.

    i don't want to be the guinea pig lol.
     
  18. power

    power Member

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    yeah i don't think it'd be policed by anyone, that's just amazon washing their hands.
     
  19. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    [​IMG]

    :lol:


    JSmith
     
  20. Ahux

    Ahux Member

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    It's no different from shopping on ebay.com.au and expecting it to be compliant just because it's a .au site. Amazon AU is still completely full of items not compliant to Australian standards shipped from god knows where.

    Side note - If no one has already, I purchased one of the Australian approved Sonoff dual's from Oiktek and I can not see any differences between it and the *pictures* of ones direct shipped from China. I have just received the one direct shipped from china today (that I bought for a true comparison) but have not had a chance to crack it open yet to compare them.

    Second note - Bunnings are now selling 'Brilliant' brand smart Wifi power outlet switches (the plug in type) for $15!! I bought 4 of them and flashed to Tasmota easily - They now talk directly with my OpenHab system :)
     

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