Cloud hosting

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by kom, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. kom

    kom Member

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    Hi guys, I've been tasked to find a suitable cloud based hosting solution that will run our ERP system. I'd prefer for this provider to be Australian based, but I have no experience with any of them.

    Can someone recommend a good service provider for me to trial??

    Thanks!
     
  2. gords

    gords Oh deer!

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    You will need to provide more details in order to get worthwhile replies.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    kom

    kom Member

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    Not sure what details, but these are some of the requirements:

    - Users 70-100 (low workload)
    - Browser accessible
    - Oracle Database
    - around 16GB+ of memory
    - high availability
    - raid


    VPS would do the trick, I'm just after a solid/reliable provider.

    Thanks
     
  4. scrantic

    scrantic Member

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    I'll Bite.

    1. Do you want managed services, support, backup, IaaS?
    2. Where are your users located?
    3. Do you have a budget?
    4. Have you thought about connectivity/latency for these users accessing the system.

    Some options, AWS, Bullet Proof, Ninefold or Rackspace for starters.
     
  5. Munity

    Munity Member

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    do it yourself with your own hardware and colo!
     
  6. asher001

    asher001 Member

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    imo the only real cloud hosting provider in Australia worth considering at the moment is AWS. It sounds like you can just go for a regular VPS though.
     
  7. Urbansprawl

    Urbansprawl Member

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    Make sure you check into your oracle licensing and how it will be charged on a shared platform.
     
  8. Gecko

    Gecko Member

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    OrionVM are worth a look, we've used them for several jobs over the years.
     
  9. username_taken

    username_taken Member

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    The oracle licenses are going to be your problem. Makes AWS hosted Oracle about your only choice if you don't want to have to pay the license for all the physical cpus regardless.

    Altho Oracle does offer hosted database services ... so that could be an option also.
     
  10. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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    *grabs popcorn*

    To the cloud!
     
  11. Daemon

    Daemon Member

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    How do you define "high availability" in your requirements? You need to work out your RTO / RPO to better choose the best solution (or solutions).

    Australia has plenty of high quality hosts available, but as your requirements grow so does the cost.

    As IACSecurity as put it, forget the word "cloud". All you're looking for is a hosting provider, then knowing what uptimes etc you need to maintain (and can justify $$$ wise) you will find a solution.

    All of the higher level providers will be able to work with you to produce a quote and let you know of any better / alternate options to suit your environment.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    kom

    kom Member

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    I'm fully aware that "Cloud" is a marketing term :tongue: And I only use this term to explain a service that is hosted by a 3rd party provider and is accessible via the internet.

    But I've been tasked to identify the cost of running our ERP system in the "cloud" so that we don't have to worry about general maintenance of the servers, investing in equipment to support high availability (automatic fail-over), backups, etc.

    As I'm not the one who'll be doing the installation, I just need to provide some general information around IaaS and the cost associated with it. Looking around it seems like it'll be around $800 per month to run:

    2 servers with: 8GB of memory each, and around 500GB of storage :confused:

    As I didn't have much time to look into this just yet, am I safe to assume these servers are automatically backed up, without any additional fees for this feature?

    And I would really appreciate further info around the Oracle database as some of you mentioned? Looking around, I haven't' seen any providers list Oracle DB as being allowed/supported? What are the pitfalls around this?
     
  13. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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  14. QuakeDude

    QuakeDude ooooh weeee ooooh

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    Something that hasn't been mentioned yet is that you need to factor in the cost of the hosting solution being down, and how that affects the business.

    Don't EVER make the assumption that 'cloud' solutions are rock solid. Microsoft still has problems with their email hosting service, even Amazon has blackouts now and again which they have trouble identifying - think about how this might impact on your business.

    In ours, the last time we had a half day outage of the systems we lost just over $500K in sales, so you need to be caureful. I would NEVER EVER EVER host our ERP externally - it'd be professional suicide, but for your business, it might be ok.

    And DEFINITELY speak to Oracle about what you're trying to do - they're absolute pricks, they'll charge you for every possible resource on the hardware you're running their software on, regardless of whether you're using it or not. Bloody thieves.

    We tried to host an application of theirs a while back, and were told that we'd need 80 licenses for 10 users running on a 2x4 core virtualized server. That was the one any only time we ever tried to virtualise their shit.
     
  15. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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    2 words: holy shit!
     
  16. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    You must be new to Oracle Licensing.

    Just ask them how much your license will be if you want to make a Database accessible by the internet...
     
  17. Urbansprawl

    Urbansprawl Member

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    Oracle don't give a fuck, they are great like that.

    Assuming you are tied to their database then AWS seems like the cheapest way to get an Oracle license on a multi tenant farm -

    http://aws.amazon.com/rds/oracle/#pricing
     
  18. Daemon

    Daemon Member

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    Actually I did, I asked for the RTO / RPO. But that's ok, you're not the only one who ignores me :D

    Agree. Complex systems have complex problems. Amazon's outages have been very complex and a combination of multiple issues at once, not the greatest fun to solve.

    Microsoft's recent outage (for Outlook.com) was as simple as a complete cooling failure, so even simple ones can have adverse effects.

    As for database pricing, I've never had to deal with Oracle... but the MS SQL Server is bad enough. Considering the performance from MySQL and PostgreSQL, paying thousands of month should get you a good consultant to convert it from a proprietary database :)
     
  19. QuakeDude

    QuakeDude ooooh weeee ooooh

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    You did too - my apologies :o
     
  20. OP
    OP
    kom

    kom Member

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    I really appreciate the feedback people, you have pointed out some serious problems around Oracle's licensing policy that my work has overlooked when assessing the ERP system.

    As some people have already pointed out: it seems that if you’ve got your servers virtualized, and your Oracle VM is running with 2 cores enabled, you’re shit out of luck as you’ll need to pay for all available cores unless you’re using their virtualization platform.

    Something like this: Intel Xeon E5645 has 12 cores, this creates a scenario whereby you’ll need - going by Oracle’s guidelines – to multiply those 12 cores with Oracle’s “core” multiplier that is applicable to your CPU, in this case it’s 0.5. So, 12 x 0.5 = 6 freaking licenses.

    I still didn’t have the time to look through IaaS providers, but considering the above requirements, will I know the exact hardware specifications of the server that is hosting my VM’s, or is this information hidden and you only get to go by the allocated specs you purchased?

    This shit is turning into a nightmare :upset:

    Or ERP will require access from the web (this is very important)... what's the damage around that :lol:
     

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