Concerns about Data Retention, Surveillance and Privacy

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Agg, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. Sankari

    Sankari Member

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    Such as? You do realise that public servants aren't responsible for policy, don't you?

    So now you're suggesting the government is introducing this legislation for the benefit of public servants. Or something.

    :confused:
     
  2. trevor68

    trevor68 Member

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    or something. :D

    "Somebody" had to ask the ministers for these changes. They don't think of everything themselves you know. I'm "fairly" certain the public didn't request them .
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2012
  3. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    What's "in it" for them?
     
  4. IACSecurity

    IACSecurity Member

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    This is why arguments against such bills made by people such as yourself, dont work. Because they are completely baseless and fall apart within seconds of questioning, for any proposed law to be changed, you need to at least have solid arguments.

    Or they are full of hilarious 'people' 'the government' 'spy' tin foil hat stuff, which is equally useless for getting pollies to change their mind.
     
  5. meremortal

    meremortal Member

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    http://www.crikey.com.au/2012/08/23/and-softly-went-our-privacy-into-the-night/

    And softly went our privacy into the night

    "With the passage of the Cybercrime Legislation Amendment Bill 2011 in the Senate yesterday, the Australian government gained the power to demand the storage of citizens’ personal data from telephone and internet usage at the behest of foreign governments. This was necessary, we were told, because Australia had to accede to the European Cybercrime Convention.

    The convention, described by the US Electronic Frontier Foundation as “one of the world’s worst internet law treaties”, is designed to enable governments to investigate citizens of other countries for activities ranging from terrorism, fraud and child p-rnography to filesharing, political activism and dissent. Crikey’s coverage of the bill’s progress is here.

    In the end, as expected, only the Greens opposed the bill, despite shadow Attorney-General George Brandis’ complaint that the government hadn’t even bothered to respond to the report on the bill by the Senate Committee on Cyber-Safety, which found several serious flaws in the legislation."

    Will Australia get to this point? Are we on a slippery slope towards this sort of surveillance and "police state"?

     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2012
  6. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    "Internet data tracking proposal seen as 'a police state' "

    http://www.smh.com.au/technology/te...al-seen-as-a-police-state-20120828-24yvn.html

     
  7. damn duck

    damn duck Member

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    Despite the outcry, they continue to push ahead with this:

    http://www.smh.com.au/technology/te...online-data-for-two-years-20120903-25amz.html

    Roxon edges toward keeping online data for two years
     
  8. alfster

    alfster Member

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    "Ms Roxon will say that law enforcement agencies need the data retention policy in order to be able to effectively target criminals."

    And in doing so they will treat everybody as a criminal. Big Brother is well & truly here
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2012
  9. trevor68

    trevor68 Member

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    Yup, as I've said before I don't even worry about this stuff anymore. Theres no point.

    If the govt wants it, and they plainly do, then it will happen, and theres nought you me nor anybody else can do about it anyhow.
     
  10. stmok

    stmok Member

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    The Gillard Govt will be out of office in the near future. They're laying the framework down before they leave. Policies don't make their presence felt until a good decade or so later.

    I'm honestly not surprised by Nicola Roxon's actions. She's the type of person that believes she (through Govt) knows what's right for other people...The type of person that enjoys the power of telling others how to live. To right every wrong or even accident. (It gives her a sense of importance.) ...But this also leads to a fatal flaw. They end up being a dictator if they remain in their current ministerial position for too long.

    The more accurate question is "what's in it for future governments"?

    The answer? Its quite simple...Information about its citizens.

    Information is power. The power in using the information as intelligence to gauge the population. To establish a database and profile its citizens without any transparent accountability. To understand your habits, opinions, etc. And to use the information against you by expressly targeting you in order to attain your support to some political agenda. ie: If they know how you think by the way you do things on the Internet, they can mold the PR/propaganda to suit the promotion of a policy they want to push through. You'd be in favour of what they're doing. (Unless you took an active role in finding out what the policy is really about).

    Politics is the art of connecting with people; it's about selling a policy or idea to the people and getting them to support it. Wouldn't it be a tactical advantage to have, if you've attained a very good idea of what people are currently thinking without needing to survey them? Forget polling, you have a more accurate gauge of what others are thinking! Tailor your policies to get max vote potential during Election time. (No longer a blind guessing game).


    China does this in order to quash any attempt to establish mass protest (activism) via online means. This is mainly because they don't want another Tiananmen Square incident like what happened in 1989.


    US Govt's NSA does this to profile everyone. Then it checks to see if there are links to really bad people in the world. Its all about looking for possible relationships.


    As they did with the Carbon Tax. Just pushed it through and not give a damn about the very people they claim they represent...They know what's good for you. ALL of you! ;)
     
  11. dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    Good idea from slashdot:

     
  12. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    What a good idea.
     
  13. damn duck

    damn duck Member

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    A terrible idea, I don't want them reading my email. Why would I willingly send it to them, even just to make a point?

    Stupid.
     
  14. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    No one said it had to be real emails.

    bunch of goatse attachments.


    or to really mess with them, PGP your goatse emails before sending them on.
     
  15. damn duck

    damn duck Member

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    http://www.zdnet.com/au/roxon-calls-for-cold-shower-on-data-retention-hysteria-7000003742/
    So it's all a big and puff? Nothing to worry about?
    I don't know about her, but there's plenty of data I can learn about someone from meta-data. It's still a log of our traffic, to everyone. Just there for the taking.

    How dare she even hide behind "but we just wanted opinions!"
    My opinion is that if you have the tenacity to even dabble with this idea, you should be dragged out of office by a mob.
     
  16. trevor68

    trevor68 Member

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  17. IACSecurity

    IACSecurity Member

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    {Ma Baker Edit: You know where the back button is, use it.}
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2012
  18. wvxman

    wvxman Member

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    This is typical Labor bullshit. First the ISP filter, now trying to find another way to stick their nanny-state noses into the lives of citizens and businesses. This kind of nonsense doesn't reach the policy stage unless there's political will in parliament to see it happen. Count the days until this shit happens.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2012
  19. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    This seems like an interesting idea. "Don't protest yet, we haven't decided to do it! Wait until we've already decided to do it and then tell us not to!"

    The whole point of the people attacking them over this is to influence the decision.
     
  20. Linkin

    Linkin Member

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    They do it now already, they just want to foist it upon the ISP's and make them responsible for it. Spy on your customers for us or you're breaking the law.
     

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