Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. Daemon

    Daemon Member

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    I always love the "it must need a reboot" scenario, users are so accustomed to the Windows way of life.

    We had one today where a web based app wasn't working for one user (He couldn't login). Dozens of others login fine, user raises issue with the local helpdesk. Local helpdesk was clever enough to determine the app was web based and ran on servers. Therefore, they had determined the issue must be the webserver and it needed to be restarted (typcial LAMP stack). Support ticket raised. Nil errors with the server, issue sent straight back to desktop support. Issue uncovered, user had wrong password.

    Ironically though the last 5 issues raised with iPhone issues have been resolved by restarting the phone. I'm convinced that Microsoft have snuck some of their Vista programmers into Apple to work on the mail products :)
     
  2. thedrover

    thedrover Member

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    I work in a college with almost 400 iPads in use. If something is not working as expected with them, I'd say over 50% of the time a reboot fixes.

    It's just not Windows boxes that need a kick in the guts every now and then.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    OH&S rules are based on "average strength", which is what it is because people are lazy.

    If you've been in the game a while, you'll notice that the maximum weight for a one man lift has been slowly reducing over the years. I used to lug large 35KG lead-lined CRT monitors around when I worked for an Architecture/Engineering firm many years ago (up and down flights of stairs between floors). Today, that would be a two-man lift on to a trolley. (Hell, I saw a place the other day with a maximum one-man lift of 20KG!)

    I understand and appreciate OH&S rules, and follow them where they apply. But with that said, they are getting worse because we as people are getting worse.

    Ultimately, we're going to end up in a future that we're already parodying today.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    20KG is pretty standard from what I see. (being a consultant, I see many workplaces).

    Not that I rack gear much these days, but recently built half a dozen Dell R620's. Heaviest 1RU box I've ever had to move*. Didn't get to see inside them, but I'm wonder how the air flow works when the thing is potted with lead.


    *just checked the specs, maximum weight 19.8KG. very dense little things
     
  5. revhed

    revhed Member

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    I see more of a trend towards "Idocracy"

    I find the problem with OH&S rules are they are interpreted and enforced by people with little idea about the disciplines those rules are applied against. It then ends up with the OH&S officer being a "power tripping" and interfering role than anything to do with actual safety.

    As an example, we had a few daisy chained power boards under a group of desks because there were a number of devices in use with bulky "power paks". It looked like a bit of a "rats nest" but was never drawing much power, and certainly nowhere near the 10 amp limit of any of the power boards or main wall circuit. (there was also no cables that crossed any thoroughfare around these desks. The OH&S dude went nuts claiming it was a "trip" hazzard - Even when we pointed out that no one actually "walks" under a desk. Not to be deterred, he then got an electrician in to "assess" the setup. It was hilarious when the electrician looked at it and said something like "well, there are multiple redundant circuit breakers in all those power boards and, as none of them are tripping there is no problem with overdraw on the circuit - no problem here"
     
  6. GreenBeret

    GreenBeret Member

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    Well for one example, in my OH&S training, we're taught to lift everything by squatting straight down and lifting it up with a vertical (not just straight) back. "Use your legs, not your back" is what they teach everyone.

    That's just about super retarded in every way and shows zero understanding of lifting and human bio-mechanics. Likely written by some person who doesn't even lift.

    Newsflash: you cannot lift anything without using your back. If your back is so fragile that it cannot lift shit, then don't even try. It's impossible to lift an object off the ground with just legs and no back.

    Zero information on how to brace your core muscles to protect your back and make the lift more effective. Or how to position your body over the object.

    Yes using your legs is important, but the back is always involved whether you like it or not.

    But seriously, 3 grown men debating how to lift a 30-odd kilo tape library is a joke and a half. How did we become so piss weak? /offtopic
     
  7. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    I guess they are writte by someone who doesn't even lift, because their target audience is people who don't even lift.

    "Lift with your Legs" is pretty easy mantra to remember.

    OH&S is, and has always been about lowest common denominator stupidity.

    Like Revhed said, Idiocracy is a more likely version of the future than Elvis' movie.
     
  8. Swathe

    Swathe (Banned or Deleted)

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    Dealing with "software developers" who think they are infallible and their product flawless.

    When you don't even allow me to file a bug or raise a support ticket, saying "we've never seen that before" is not a sufficient resolution to my issue.
     
  9. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    I love getting that response.

    "Well we have and we can re-create so what do you need me to send over and i'll give you a call in a few hours for an update ok?" is my usual response to that kind of answer
     
  10. Swathe

    Swathe (Banned or Deleted)

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    Apparently 300 users internationally constitutes a large enough user base and variety of platform configuration to wash their hands of it. I got the good old "re-install it" routine. I asked if there were any specific registry keys that require deleting in addition to running the uninstaller and he had no idea.

    I'm amassing as much ammunition as I can to hand to our client so they can put the pressure on.

    The application has no form of error reporting and the vendor no discernible support process. Also the software is distributed on burnt disks with paper inserts and seemingly whatever blank disc case they have lying around.
     
  11. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    I've been dealing with a software supplier who treats all support requests as if they've come from end users, it's a painful process and thers is never any sure way of having the request escalated to someone with the knowledge or ability to help.

    It seems that all their useful staff are 95% working on their next version, even though this one only just came out.

    It doesn't help when those above love the supplier and want to use all their products.
     
  12. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Half the reason I love open source is the bug reporting process.

    When I worked for $big_finance_org, we had RHEL everywhere. We were migrating a bunch of HPUX systems to RHEL, and had to literally pick up a few hundred Korn Shell scripts and migrate them across.

    When we did, we found that unsetting a variable that wasn't set would throw non-zero exit code, and break all our enterprise scheduler software expecting clean exits. We checked the Korn Shell documentation on both systems as well as online, and couldn't find anything. So we reported it to RedHat as a "bug", not expecting much.

    RedHat got back to us straight away, and said they were investigating. 4 hours later they said they too had checked the developer documentation, and found nothing there describing the expect behaviour of what ksh should do in this event. I expected that to be the end of it, but no! They went and tested on HPUX and AIX internally, and noted that neither platform gave the same behaviour as their code. It was deemed that ksh on Linux should work the same as ksh on UNIX. They sent us a diff we could compile into our own SRPMs immediately, and informed us that once it passed formal review, they'd integrated it into the next point release (which they did).

    I was blown away. My experience with dev companies was all sorts of fussing and fighting, and for something like this where they could clearly have stood their ground and said it was not a bug, they were just so casual about it, and immediately agreed that they should conform to convention set elsewhere, despite a lack of any formal standard.

    One small example (there are others less interesting, but equally as quick and painless), but just part of the reason I love working with commercial open source. It's just an entirely different attitude, and people seem to be much less precious and personal about code. And while I love Ubuntu for my own use, it's just part of the reason I keep turning to RedHat for large commercial deployments. Their support really is second to none.
     
  13. Urbansprawl

    Urbansprawl Member

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    Not a rant, but I think it is pretty boss that I can get 512GB of RAM and 32 CPU cores in a 2RU server for less than 30k nowadays. Now I just need way cheaper high performance 10GBE switchports.
     
  14. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Good point 10GBE has been out for ages, it's just not getting to that market saturation point yet. I suppose it's because 1GBE is more than good enough for 90% of cases.
     
  15. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Exactly the same thing was said about 100mbit vs 1GbE (and 10 vs 100 before that). :)
     
  16. Urbansprawl

    Urbansprawl Member

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    I'd be happy with $400 a port including optics, but for proper switches (Layer 3 fabric switches) its not even close to that.
     
  17. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    personally, I was running gig at home much sooner after it came out, than 10g.

    IIRC I got my first 1gig switch in 2002 (3 years after standardisation).
    10g standardised in 2007, I've got two 10g NICs, but no switch. Simply you still can't get just a simple 8-port or so 10g switch for reasonable money. I'd happily spend ~$500 or so on such a device (which is what I spent on my first 8-port gig switch).

    Even in commerical/government, I see 10g as core/distribution layers, but still only 1g at access layer.

    I think as SSDs become more prevalent in the datacentre, we'll see 10g come to the server.
     
  18. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    We're running 10GbE to quite a few workstations. Media industry though.
     
  19. s.Neo

    s.Neo Member

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    Netgear have the XS708E which can be had for about $1000. Still more than I'd want to pay for home networking, but better than most.
     
  20. mooboyj

    mooboyj Member

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    64 cores, 512GB RAM and 24 900GB SAS disks for 21K;)

    Dell C6145 plus education pricing FTW:D
     

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