Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. TehCamel

    TehCamel Member

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    Yeaaaa.. i have an MPN account linked to my liveaccount (and thus my free azure stuff) and then my O365 account linked to a corporate account
    both with same password and same email address :/
     
  2. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius Member

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    I signed up years ago to that microsoft virtual academy using my work email. Wind forward a bit and we now use o365, so I get that same work/personal thing when I sign in. Hasn't really bothered me though. *shrug.
     
  3. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    Out off all the shitty copiers I've used,
    We're using Ricoh at the moment, and they are, thus far, the least shit.
     
  4. IACSecurity

    IACSecurity Member

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    Fantastic chance to push through pending initiatives, such a bad reason that it gets the air time now though.

    very common. This occurs for any federated login type approach (ADFS, Ping Federate, OAM, TAM). This is extremely common for larger companies.

    ADFS can give you some of the nice remote access solutons (the new version of direct access) along with remote access into your internal applications for road warriors). There are many reasons to keep onsite ADFS. Even when you have your 2FA for internal systems, you link it to your ADFS instead of using 3rd party 2FA providers.

    Doing a proper ADFS install is pretty beastly. 2 front ends. 2 backends, 2 SQL servers in a cluster for token replay protection. That is a lot of moving parts, the smallest place I have done ADFS stuff is a couple/few thousand users. Biggest was scaled with 16 front end servers. Even at that point other solutions are technically far superior. It has its happy place in middle sized orgs will low complexity requirements.
     
  5. AzonIc

    AzonIc Member

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    Microsoft has made trying to license & activate Office 2016 Home & Small Business Edition near on impossible for more than 5 instances :mad::mad: especially if you wanted to do it at a rate of more than one per day
     
  6. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    so buy O365 Bus Premium and don't worrying about it.
     
  7. wazza

    wazza Member

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    I'm positive they're intentionally doing it to make people give up and go for o365, but think it was their idea and not something they were forced to do by MS.
     
  8. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    You saucy minx you, talk dirty to me...
     
  9. j3ll0

    j3ll0 Member

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    billions_s01e03_chuck_wendy_cbt.mkv

    .
     
  10. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    billions is so great.

    *edit*

    I want to punch Veeam in the fucking dickhole. IF THERE IS 6 FUCKING TAPES IN THE "FREE" MEDIA POOL, PICK ONE AND GET ON WITH IT.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  11. KDog

    KDog Member

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    Plus on top of this when installing shitty application it restarts your machine with no warning and no abort option...
     
  12. AzonIc

    AzonIc Member

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    We are buying some business premium for staff but as a hospital we have a lot of nurses without email so buying a licence per user is far more costly than licencing the workstation

    I would have gone for an open value plan but it was more than double the cost



    And yes it seems intentionally difficult to use
     
  13. bcann

    bcann Member

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    I used to like xerox stuff, but of late (its been 10+ years since i last touched them) their drivers have gone to shit.
     
  14. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius Member

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    Probably the best run we've had has been with konica. The drivers play nice with just about everything, there's no built in weirdness or quirks that I've stumbled across, they're just nice machines.

    Still have a few ricoh's around, only issue I've ever had with them is there are a small number of settings that are inaccessible via the web console, you physically have to stand in front of the machine to change them. That's a bit of a pita, but once configured they've given us no grief, drivers have been fine.

    We recently had a load of canon printers dumped on us for $reasons, they've been less cooperative. It took me 30mins on the first one to realise, none of the network settings you input actually take effect until you powercycle the machine..Quite confusing standing there looking at everything being set properly, have the machine happily report the right settings to you, only to have it refuse to connect to the network. Also annoyed at the constant prompts to change the default username and password. Personally I'd happily change it, but that upsets the service agents, who once being told the new creds change it back to default. :rolleyes: On the bright side, no driver issues so far and no real config challenges other than having to reboot to make network changes. Also, they're 80's beige. Why. Just why.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I hate printing at the best of times, but point blank if a company doesn't actively contribute drivers to CUPS, I don't use them.

    With that in mind, I tell businesses to buy HP printers, or bugger off. When they cheap out and buy something like some Lexmark shit with utterly skullfucked drivers, I congratulate them on buying a $3K door stop, and the fact that their "savings" weren't, because now they have to go and buy a HP like I told them to anyway.

    It's printing, FFS. We had this sorted in the 80s (printing was literally how GNU started, after a beardy-nerd got the shits up with bad print drivers in a small AI lab at MIT). If a vendor is making that any more complex than postscript over Ethernet, they can just go and get fucked.
     
  16. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    HP Windows drivers were utter balls (I've not used them for a long while now)

    Here's a "universal driver" but it is only universal for a mostly lowest common denominator.

    HP Consumer MFC drivers are literally testicles.
     
  17. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    From the Wannacry Thread


    Was this two separate attacks? or was it the same company for both?

    Was it social engineering or a technical breach?
     
  18. Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    I think it would be highly likely to at least be partially due to social engineering.
     
  19. g00nster

    g00nster Member

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    https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/20...pay-orange-is-the-new-black-ransom-to-hacker/

    Netflix acknowledged the leak, which it said was caused by a breach at a “production vendor” also used by other TV studios. Netflix is cleverly covering its back by pointing the level of integration – and vulnerability – in the TV industry, but there is no question the breach still lands at its door.

    It’s not clear whether the way streaming services process digital content is that different or less secure from established broadcasters but the minute a show exists in a form that can be copied it becomes vulnerable to theft.


    Spill the beans Elvis - We'd like to know the inside gossip
     
  20. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Separate attacks.

    "Orange is the New Black" was a tiny little audio studio that still used a website running on an old version of IIS built by Microsoft Frontpage (no sarcasm here, there's plenty of articles about it). They were contracted by Netflix to do various dialogue sync and music production things for the show, which required a full copy of the footage to sync to. They were broken in to via a flaw on their website, and the first half of the season was stolen. The attackers then held Netflix to ransom. Netflix refused to pay, and the footage was put up on a torrent site.

    This one was particularly pertinent to us. Our business is multi-faceted, as we do a lot of different work in different areas (including the same sort of audio production in our dedicated audio department). We often get the "but it's just audio, who'd want to steal that?" type questions from our staff, to which our reply is the standard "don't be the weakest link", as we bring them up to spec with the rest of the business. That one attack alone has justified years of vigilance from our IT guys, and made a few staff realise that we weren't doing it just to be dicks and make life difficult for the lolz.

    Almost any TV show or movie made today is worked on by at least a dozen studios or more. It takes way too many man hours to do the volume of digital post production in either vision or audio on a production like that, so things are farmed out to bigger studios who in turn farm out to smaller studios. All it takes is just one of them in the chain to be vulnerable, and bad things can happen. Attackers are waking up to this, and actively targeting the little guys.

    "Pirates of the Caribbean 5" is a very recent attack, and details are light at the moment. A representative from Disney blamed "smaller studios and vendors" for their lack of security, which suggests a similar MO - target the little guys who don't have the cash for good security, but might have a copy of the film on site. Like the Netflix attack, Disney was given a ransom notice, and is refusing to pay. As a result, I expect to see the film up on torrent sites in a matter of days. Full release is only a week away, but that will certainly affect opening weekend ticket sales, which are the most critical for a film's financial success in the west.

    I expect more details on the "Pirates" (ironic) leaks to come out in the following weeks. If I were a betting man (and I'm not), I'd put it on a technical breach as well. But we'll have to wait and see.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017

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