Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

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  1. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Am I missing something, surely you've outsourced this banal problem to some company that does email better than we could ever hope to do internally?

    #ShitpostFriday
     
  2. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    dot1x means your sysadmins haz to PKI, and that's one of the golden, rule-of-thumb markers of in technical competency IMO (i.e. understanding PKI basics), ergo...

    Then there's the non dot1x supplicant device issue, which sticky mac addresses means is better than nothing, or you go full BOFH and do profiling / push ACLs based on MAC profiles but then you're talking serious investment and sysadmin time on ISE/clearpass/foreskin I mean forescout. Let alone if you're like most Australian SMB and have a nightmarish mishmash of switching vendors/platforms/invariably horrifically out of date software, so mass platform standardisations or you're burning time playing ISE to HP vs Dell vs Cisco integration and then oh this feautre works on XYZ but not ABC etc.... that's before you even scope for dot1x compatibility on SoE, people's BYOD, guest, oh wait so you want guest enrolment via portal? It goes on...

    Its all expensive and much like the old USB debate (not trying to start a fire here) most companies just can't be bothered for wired environments (ironically having a proper dot1x infra for wireless is often the foothold you need to push for full dot1x rollout)

    disclaimer: Have setup dot1x before, would do again, but @ the end of the day its the client's decision
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
  3. mesaoz

    mesaoz Member

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    Knew that was coming, if you're gonna run shit onsite though you gotta virtualise that sheeeeet, not much use banging on the outsourcing drum, no one is listening to you man :p
     
  4. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    Please don't be doing exchange. :confused:

    Stand up new Box, add to namespace, let Autodiscover take you to the place you belong.

    User Impact is like milliseconds as you cut from one DB/Host to another - neither Outlook, nor OWA will ever know.

    Or in CBB's case realise that some fuck broke all the receive connectors and that nothing will work properly out of the box till he reverts all the connectors back to defaults.
     
  5. bcann

    bcann Member

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    funnily enough when i last did pretty much this on exchange 2013 just before christmas it broke outbound send for a few minutes until it worked it out itself. and by broke i mean sat in the queue until it worked it out. And i was being generous saying 5 minutes.
     
  6. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I unno, lots of threads lately with folks chewing the fat about O365 vs GSuite. Folks are starting to catch on.

    Speaking for myself and just pure propeller-head lulz, I want a Blackphone and ProtonMail to play with.
     
  7. mesaoz

    mesaoz Member

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    I'm currently migrating the business I work for from exch2010 (vm's ahoy etc...) to 365. Very slow process while they umm and ahh about giving me money to buy licenses. I've had the hybrid end configured for months now, got 5% of our mailboxes sitting there... grr, red tape, grumble grumble
     
  8. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    That would be the shadow queue on the send connector. Mail isn't lost - outbound mail will be delayed, but Mail isn't supposed to be instant externally anyway.

    Honestly, If you're going to 365 and you have no need for Exchange on-prem - don't even bother w/ Hybrid, just use skykick/migrationwiz and sip pina colada's with Dre.

    Get handy w/ PS though - because you lose the ability to manage shit "teh oldfashioned way".
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
  9. mesaoz

    mesaoz Member

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    I picked hybrid for exactly this reason though, I knew it'd end up getting stalled on licenses... and sadly I was correct.

    I used to work for an MSP before I came here where I migrated several clients using both skykick and migrationwiz, both were pretty good experiences. The standard cutover onboarding process is so much nicer, I do agree. Just not practical in this instance.
     
  10. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    honestly I'm still pretty hurt about the fact that Hybrid is cancer. So many caveats and weirdness - even 2016 to ExOn.
     
  11. mesaoz

    mesaoz Member

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    How about that calendar sharing between onprem and offprem mailboxes... so good :sick:
     
  12. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    here use this hack that might work, until it doesn't.
     
  13. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Sweet you seem to have a complete handle on all the intricacies and pitfalls, I'll let you take that job!

    Same when someone says that's a 5 minute job... then it just became your job!

    Automated that shit 7 years ago, manual builds are so 10 years ago!
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
  14. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    I can understand why people outsource email, but never understood why people were so eager to. One of the least demanding systems to manage, and most of the work (helpdesk calls) don't go away regardless.
     
  15. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    Because the Opex bucket is easy to take money out of, but the Capex bucket is always empty.

    $X/user/month is easier to get budget for than $X000 up front.
     
  16. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    From what i've seen - its because a shit ton of people have implemented Exchange poorly and/or have inherited systems implemented poorly. Honestly, I've come across 2 deployments out of probably 100+ that I would say "hey, someone did this right, and all it needs is a certificate now and then or a patch".

    Like a lot of MS stuff - it will largely just work, even if you're an absolute retard - but it becomes troublesome and painful to manage/operate.

    Removing the design and implementation of the infrastructure side of Email is an obvious advantage if you're struggling because your core infrastructure was junk - hence its attraction.

    However If you don't have those problems thrust upon you - I firmly believe (and have experience with) that it is administratively more cumbersome to manage O365/G-Suite than it is to manage a well tuned Exchange 2010 onwards deployment.

    Depending on when you got on board with 365/Google Apps, I'd argue that 2003 was still easier if you were kicking those tyres with the cloud behemoths in the early early days.
     
  17. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    That's what the T part stands for in IT, and why I've got a Job.

    If I'm not making it clear what the risks are with, and offering alternatives to, ideas proposed by those above and around me, I might as well not be there.
     
  18. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    And?
    What did you tell them?
     
  19. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Nah, you're both missing the bigger picture.

    As someone else here said a while back (might have been PabloEscobar, might have been someone else, can't remember), "email" isn't just "email" any more. What folks actually mean is "GroupWare".

    "Exchange" isn't enough any more. Email is not the one and only way we collaborate and communicate. What we want now are tightly integrated systems of information sharing. If you don't have an integrated email, calendar, IM, voice/video/online-meeting, document/spreadsheet, knowledgebase, wiki, support portal, etc, etc system, then you're already behind.

    Is "Exchange" non-demanding to manage? Sure. Is Exchange + Lync/Skype + SharePoint + Office + a bunch of other shit? Now you're starting to get into a world of high effort, high cost rollouts.

    And this is where Microsoft missed the ball (initially, they're catching up now finally). Microsoft won the day in a pre-internet world *precisely because* of integration. They had a bunch of products that were quite frankly pretty average by themselves, but the sheer attraction was the end-to-end integration between all their stuff. Then this thing called the Internet happened, and Microsoft's model fell apart.

    You've got that old model: "Buy version X of 5 different major products, integrate them, wait 2-3 years, version X+1 is released, wait for it to be tested and patched to SP1 and ready, buy it all again at huge dollar cost, upgrade your shit at huge I.T effort and dollar cost, and do it all again in 3 years". Suddenly there's a new model: "Pay a monthly subscription, have someone else constantly upgrade little tiny pieces of it as you go". Ask yourself - what version of GMail is out right now? Answer: who the fuck cares, it's always the latest. Is it a bit devops/#yolo? Sure, but that's what we demand these days. Today's release is tomorrow's legacy.

    That last point is ludicrously important for me. I've got fuck-all spare staff and spare hours to throw at upgrades. I've got a metric shitload of other business problems that aren't generic, that literally no other company on Earth can do for me, that I need very my very industry-specific crew working on full time without distraction. I can't throw them at periodic upgrades. Worse, massive upgrades aren't just technical problems. They're people problems. Adapting folks to change is exhausting, and requires far more skill than just upgrading a software release. I can't think of software as "current here and now" any more. Everything I install, I need to think about what will happen when it's legacy. Jesus, look at the NHS and what happened to them, stuck on WindowsXP. Nightmare stuff.

    Why do *I* outsource email? For the reasons above. First, it's not just email. It's a suite of stuff (we use 20 odd different, fully integrated Google tools in production, with lots more available to us). And it's upgraded for us constantly in small increments that don't shock our user base. Along with that is a constant, silent infrastructure upgrade to go with it. Our industry needs to invest every single dollar spent on hardware it can into render power. Unlike most reading this, we are constantly waiting for faster hardware to appear. For most, some 50+ core, 128GB+ RAM box is total overkill for what they need to do. For us, it could easily be 10 times faster and still not be fast enough. With that in mind, I don't want to be worrying about hardware for my auxiliary services. The fact that every now and then Google email me and go "oh hey, we just upgraded all your users to an extra 5GB of storage each, don't stress about it" means I know they'll take care of those constant micro upgrades in hardware as well as software.

    (And I say "Google" in all of the above because that's what we went with - Office365 with the full suite of tools is just as competent, but was 3 years too late and too expensive for our business. However it is a good fit for many places today, and IMHO an upgrade to Exchange for all the reasons I outline in this post).

    If it was literally *just* email, I'd still have my trusty Dovecot server running. But those days are long gone.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2017
  20. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    Are you factoring in hardware/storage/hypervisor/network/rack/power/cooling + redundancy and patching/upgrade and integration-into-XYZ work?
     

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