Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. bcann

    bcann Member

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    I can guarantee you, this one will be a local hire, and given our predilection for hiring local locals, completely unqualified/inexperienced, but because there from the local town they will get it over another more qualified.
     
  2. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Yikes.
     
  3. waltermitty

    waltermitty Member

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    What's the pay packet bcann?
     
  4. bcann

    bcann Member

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    Yeah the short version of that ad is, we need a SQL DB Guru to help us write an integration layer and suck data from two really shit apps (Procura and .... god please kill me now MYOB), and write a whole bunch of mini DB's to sort out the shitshow of fucking excel spreadsheets that we having living here because ... well because people.

    To be honest, not sure have only just come back from holidays this week, if your interested and an SQL DB Guy PM me and i can find out.
     
  5. wullieb1

    wullieb1 Member

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    Nope.

    That all depends on what you're implementing and who then has to manage it.
     
  6. Soarer GT

    Soarer GT Member

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    About 7 years ago I formed a "Rogue Squadron" project team where IT staff would automate all our shit in our spare time without proper time allocation approval from management. Simple stuff like building scripts to automate the creation of SFTP sites with the right folders/permissions and auto downloading from the edge server every 15 minutes to a local location and deleting shit from the edge server. It was previously all done manually. When the tools were created with a proper admin page, we gave it to the Technical Account managers who then refused to use it... The same account managers who would call at 7pm screaming for transfer sites to be set up to secure clients requests after a meeting. Rest assured, automating shit will make your life easier, but wont make you less valuable and your job security is safe.

    Edit. It was previously done manually because the files were sometimes large, so you'd need to do an ls into a temp file then ls after 15 minutes to see if the file sizes had changed. if they were the same ( no more data being uploaded ) you'd initiate the transfer.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018 at 2:14 PM
  7. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Quick skim through this video just now, but yeah, that sort of project wouldn't even be a blip on our radar. He talks about "large media" and "large editing team", but that's not even 1/4 of what a shitty little TV show would have, let alone a film.

    A decent enough intro to think about some of the problems our business faces. But scale everything up by a order of magnitude for TV, and another order of magnitude for film.

    Also, he's using Windows end to end. Software homogeneity never occurs in the real world. Someone mentioned "permissions are simples!" above. Yeah, nah.
     
  8. ex4n

    ex4n Member

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    I think most business owners are scared of their staff automating stuff, because they are so used to the do work/bill per hour model, and managers who don't have those skills are scared that they won't be relevant anymore. I spent ages at my last job trying to get the boss to convert clients to a more fully managed/automated model rather than just charging when stuff breaks, but he was never interested in doing it right.
     
  9. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I'm always envious of people who have teams. :(
     
  10. Soarer GT

    Soarer GT Member

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    When I say team... 2 senior DBA's (cross skilled with systems) and 2 Senior SysAdmins(cross skilled with development and networking). Not big by any standards. We were just technically effective. It was a team I built myself and I still call them the "dream team".

    Edit... Then again, if you have 4 senior IT people in a room, they "should" be able to do anything.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018 at 2:37 PM
  11. tree86ers

    tree86ers Member

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    sorta windows end to end.. from memory there is a petabyte server there managed by a Linux environment of some sort.. at least at one stage (not trying to seem nit picking just informative). That was one of his more interesting videos.
    Yeah there work flow is for there content alone, 14 short form (5 - 20 min max) videos between the 3 main channels a week.
     
  12. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Bigger than 1.
     
  13. tree86ers

    tree86ers Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  14. 2SHY

    2SHY Member

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  15. wazza

    wazza Member

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    I've been through many iterations of how to best help people while also teaching them or giving them the knowledge to do it themselves next time. The most effective way I've found so far is to 1. have documentation/procedures on how to do said task and 2. tell any user who encounters issues while following the procedure that they must go through the procedure with me watching - I'll fix any issues that genuinely crop up, but this prevents people from trying to handball something to you because they don't want to spend the time doing it themselves.
    I also like to "make the dog clean up it's own mess" to prevent future issues - had many cases where users were simply bumbling their way through things without a care in the world and doing tasks incorrectly, so wherever possible rather than simply fixing the issue and telling them it's fixed, I'll guide them through fixing it themselves (or give them the procedure document on how to do so) - quite often they'll comment that it's a long and annoying process (which I agree with) and my only comment is that the process is ONLY required when they fail to correctly follow a previous process, so if they don't want to do the long and annoying process again, they should follow the original process correctly.
    Sure both of these take a long time to do, and don't immediately save me time if I'm having to guide the user through the process anyway, but it stops them handballing the issue to me and thus saves plenty of time in the future.

    In my experience this is a large part of the reason - there are many things I'm now able to generate automated reports on instead of people manually putting the reports together, and others that would be possible with very minor process changes (instead they implement larger changes to keep it out of the system!), but I keep getting stonewalled on these - the usual reason (not directly given, but reading between the lines) is that the automated reports aren't able to have the figures fudged to make the person/team etc look better than they truly are.

    Have been told the same, and have tried this at almost every job I've had - only been close to successful once (left just before the downsizing), but all of the other times have directly benefited me as I've automated the tedious repetitive tasks and then taken on far more interesting ones in their place.
     
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  16. Soarer GT

    Soarer GT Member

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    Ive never had issues training people up with the right leadership and management coaching to build an effective team. I owe it all to my old OPS Director and Services manager who were fucking guns.... Like seriously, I'd leave any job I was with just to work and learn from them. The OPS director was on top of everything and provided leadership training 24/7... The services manager taught you how to be a hardass. You could give them a call to bail you out of jail and they'd be like... "Bad day?". But in my personal experience, I've only had 2 in my 20 year career role who are like that. They're so thin on the ground, we so desperately need more of them to provide leadership to the next generation of IT leaders. Learn to say no and not take shit.

    One of the most "Zero fucks given" moments was when we were doing an audit of people who pay on time vs people who dont. I was a junior at the time back in 2002, so gave him a list of companies who were 1 month, 2 months, 3 months and 4 months behind their payments. Big fucking companies. He picked up the list, drove me up to the DC and started unplugging fucks... Like... "This fuck hasnt paid in 3 months..." Unplug their server. Call centre gets a frantic call at 5pm and guess what? We got paid real fast. By 9pm he gave me a list of people to plug back in.
     
  17. wazza

    wazza Member

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    Same thing works when you're an employee too - long time ago and fairly early in my career I had an employer dragging their feet on paying expenses, and they weren't cheap expenses either (was doing remote NSW installs, so each week was a few hundred $$ in fuel, 4 nights hotel expenses, food expenses etc) - expenses were meant to be paid weekly with our salary but for some reason they had delays, after the 2nd week of no expenses being paid I advised my manager they had 1 day to pay it, else I wouldn't return until expenses were paid - no expenses paid, so I didn't show up on monday and called my manager to tell them exactly why I wasn't in - by early afternoon they paid the expenses so I showed up the next day, and they never delayed my expenses again. Also had a mate who was fighting a different employer for a good couple of months to get expenses paid, he didn't want to do anything drastic and "damage his relationship with his boss" until I explained that it was his boss who had damaged their relationship by not paying what was owed, he did as I advised and advised if expenses weren't paid he wouldn't attend until they had been, and similar to my experience it only took a couple of days for them to realise he was serious and pay what he was owed.
     
  18. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    When I was employed I would never pay expenses out of my pocket after some bad experiences, last full-time employer wanted me to pay expenses for a trip out of my pocket, I explained I don't ask them to pay my mortgage and then make them wait for me to pay them back, give me a company CC or pre-paid CC or cash. No issue, they gave me a pre-paid CC.
     
  19. Soarer GT

    Soarer GT Member

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    The kicker was that during this time, the CFO was screaming at IT and other departments to reduce the budgets (no payrises for IT staff and no upgraded servers) due to cashflow but didnt want to offend large customers who had not paid their bills. The solution by the SDM was brutal and effective. Once he learned that he (and the whole team) werent getting payrises, he got real angry... The CFO was probably on $200k+ but blamed internal departments for his lack of affirmative action and it was easier to tell an internal team to make servers out of thin air than to possibly upset a client over unpaid bills for 4 months. If the SDM was a CFO, the issue probably would have been resolved much earlier.

    Looking back at the situation from where I am now, I couldnt decide which way it would have gone if no contractual rules were in place (eg. 2 months you get a warning, 3 months, you get disconnected ). I understand the need to keep good relations with clients, but no one wants to work or provide services for free. I guess that's why they get paid the big bucks.

    Edit. I was probably on $46k at the time as a junior... just moving out of helpdesk, so it was an eye opener to see how the managers work.
     
  20. caspian

    caspian Member

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    seeing how management works is always an enlightening experience. it's not always beneficial, but at least you get an insight into how things get as badly fucked up as they are due to high level "direction" from people who often need the issue explained to them in ELI5 terms so they can make a decision. which can turn out to be impossible to implement - like prioritising everything, with less staff and less budget, in a shorter delivery schedule. because requiring the impossible solves their problem, regardless of what havoc it causes for others.

    I used to have one work situation where one totally uninformed PHB manager simultaneously agreed to a support contract with a vendor, while another signed a supply contract with a provider, that have a major air gap between their limits. this left the business with a burgeoning volume of insoluble trouble tickets where there was no possible path to resolution. I told them in very plain terms that their options were to pay more to revisit the support contract, pay more to revisit the supply contract, or accept that we had an insoluble problem of their making. management response: put an OLA on the tickets involved, and hold the staff accountable in their annual performance appraisals for not coming up with a magic solution. staff response: every single staff member including myself either resigned or found another position, other than the deadwood not good enough to find another job. result: the problem still exists to this day, and will probably continue to. the people manning that role are by definition either those promoted to their level of incompetence and thus stuck there forever, or short-timers who see it as a foot-in-the-door role to be done for as short a period as possible, thus ensuring maximum brain drain for that group.
     

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